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BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | May 23, 2013
Sometimes it helps to share your goals and setbacks with others in similar straits. That's sort of the theory behind the Maryland CASH Campaign's financial coaching program that will start in June. The program will be open to 10 to 15 Baltimore-area residents who will set a goal and meet weekly for six weeks for group coaching so they can reach their target. Just as some people manage to shed pounds through weight-loss programs with group support, some people achieve financial goals in a group setting, too, said Robin McKinney, director of the Maryland CASH Campaign.  "Some prefer the accountability you have with a group.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2013
UPDATE: The run has just been extended through Sept. 8. With a fresh story angle and imaginative songs, “A Chorus Line” created one singular sensation on Broadway back in 1975. The musical, which chalked up a slew of Tonys and the Pulitzer Prize, enjoyed a record-breaking 15-year run that would stand uncontested until some singing felines came along. As an energetic, mostly persuasive revival at Olney Theatre Center reconfirms, the slice-of-theater-life scenario of the show still clicks, often affectingly.
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NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | July 14, 1998
Two of Howard County's most vocal anti-violence agencies have formed a partnership aimed at keeping at-risk teen-agers out of trouble and out of jail.The Domestic Violence Center of Howard County and the Sexual Trauma Treatment, Advocacy and Recovery Center (STTAR) have received a $55,000 grant to fund Youth Intervention Partnership, a 10-week group therapy program for high-risk youth.The partnership between STTAR and the Domestic Violence Center is a logical one, said Cheryl DePetro, STTAR's executive director.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | May 23, 2013
Sometimes it helps to share your goals and setbacks with others in similar straits. That's sort of the theory behind the Maryland CASH Campaign's financial coaching program that will start in June. The program will be open to 10 to 15 Baltimore-area residents who will set a goal and meet weekly for six weeks for group coaching so they can reach their target. Just as some people manage to shed pounds through weight-loss programs with group support, some people achieve financial goals in a group setting, too, said Robin McKinney, director of the Maryland CASH Campaign.  "Some prefer the accountability you have with a group.
NEWS
By Denise Gellene and Denise Gellene,Los Angeles Times | July 23, 2007
Contradicting an old belief, new research released yesterday found that group therapy didn't prolong the lives of women with advanced cases of breast cancer. The report in the journal Cancer found that support groups improved patients' quality of life and had beneficial effects on mood and pain, but it undercut what had been seen as the greatest potential benefit. In 1989, a landmark study found that group therapy doubled the lives of women with metastatic breast cancer, a finding that spurred proliferation of cancer support groups and fueled a debate about the effect of psychology on the course of cancer.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | December 16, 2001
While most homeowners associations are content to provide residents with swimming pools, walking paths and other ordinary suburban niceties, the Columbia Association has always dished up a richer smorgasbord of services. The association offers before- and after-school day care. It helps students from Howard County travel to sister cities in Spain and France. It runs a day spa -- complete with massage and sea-salt scrubs. For years, the association operated a bus service. Now comes something even further afield from the parks-and-recreation basics: group therapy.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun Reporter | May 31, 2008
Dr. Theodore M. Feldberg, a retired psychiatrist who was an early advocate and teacher of patient group therapy, died of cardiovascular disease May 23 at his Cross Keys home. He was 88. Born in Newark, N.J., he earned a bachelor's degree at Drew University and initially studied at the New York and Richmond schools of social work. From 1942 to 1946, he served in the Army as a clinical psychologist and social worker. He then moved to Baltimore and earned a degree at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, where he also did his internship and residency in psychiatry.
NEWS
March 4, 1997
An Associated Press article that appeared Feb. 12 gave erroneous information about a Wisconsin woman's suit against her former psychiatrist. The suit does not allege that the psychiatrist, Dr. Kenneth C. Olson of Bozeman, Mont., billed patient Nadean Cool's insurance company for group therapy. In addition, St. Elizabeth Hospital was dismissed as a defendant in the lawsuit.The Sun regrets the errors.Pub Date: 3/04/97
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Sun Staff Writer | August 31, 1995
After more than a year, Carroll County's only counseling program for men who batter their wives or girlfriends is set to start anew this fall.The program, offered through Family and Children's Services of Central Maryland, ended in July 1994 when the Carroll office lost part of its state funding.Since then, men who were ordered by a Carroll judge to attend a therapy program or those who sought counseling on their own had to travel to a program in Lochearn run by the Family and Children's Services office in Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez | October 7, 1990
It's always on Robert Bentley's mind, when he's watching a ballgame or mowing the lawn, always there when he's just going about his everyday business. But the 58-year-old West Baltimore resident doesn't talk about it much. He keeps it all inside.Mr. Bentley's wife, Ellen, needs to talk about it. She goes to meetings all over town several times a week to be with people like herself, looking for a way to make it better.But after more than a year, she said, it isn't much better at all.It has been this way for the Bentleys since 10:30 p.m. Aug. 11, 1989, when their 19-year-old son, Donald, a 1988 graduate of Gilman School for whom great things were predicted, was shot to death in a street robbery on Maryland Avenue just below North Avenue.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun Reporter | May 31, 2008
Dr. Theodore M. Feldberg, a retired psychiatrist who was an early advocate and teacher of patient group therapy, died of cardiovascular disease May 23 at his Cross Keys home. He was 88. Born in Newark, N.J., he earned a bachelor's degree at Drew University and initially studied at the New York and Richmond schools of social work. From 1942 to 1946, he served in the Army as a clinical psychologist and social worker. He then moved to Baltimore and earned a degree at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, where he also did his internship and residency in psychiatry.
NEWS
By Denise Gellene and Denise Gellene,Los Angeles Times | July 23, 2007
Contradicting an old belief, new research released yesterday found that group therapy didn't prolong the lives of women with advanced cases of breast cancer. The report in the journal Cancer found that support groups improved patients' quality of life and had beneficial effects on mood and pain, but it undercut what had been seen as the greatest potential benefit. In 1989, a landmark study found that group therapy doubled the lives of women with metastatic breast cancer, a finding that spurred proliferation of cancer support groups and fueled a debate about the effect of psychology on the course of cancer.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | August 28, 2005
AT A MEETING of recovering drug addicts in West Baltimore the other night, there were more answers than questions, which is a good thing in group therapy - it means there's honesty in the room. Everyone seemed to feel free to recount their struggles and express their feelings, and no man put his brother on the spot with questions - until they got to me. "Would the gentleman in the back like to explain what he is doing here?" asked a slender man, who spoke with an exotic accent, looking at me from his seat along the wall.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | December 16, 2001
While most homeowners associations are content to provide residents with swimming pools, walking paths and other ordinary suburban niceties, the Columbia Association has always dished up a richer smorgasbord of services. The association offers before- and after-school day care. It helps students from the Howard County community travel to sister cities in Spain and France. It runs a day spa - complete with massage and sea-salt scrubs. For years, the association operated a bus service. Now comes something even further afield from the parks-and-recreation basics: group therapy.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | December 16, 2001
While most homeowners associations are content to provide residents with swimming pools, walking paths and other ordinary suburban niceties, the Columbia Association has always dished up a richer smorgasbord of services. The association offers before- and after-school day care. It helps students from Howard County travel to sister cities in Spain and France. It runs a day spa -- complete with massage and sea-salt scrubs. For years, the association operated a bus service. Now comes something even further afield from the parks-and-recreation basics: group therapy.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 16, 2000
Who would have thought that Diana Ross and the Supremes would have made their comeback as an opening act? But that's pretty much what happened Wednesday night, when Ross and the Supremes kicked off their "Return to Love" tour at the First Union Spectrum in Philadelphia. The show opened with an hour-long set in which the reconstituted trio ran through its greatest hits, everything from "Where Did Our Love Go" to "The Happening." Then, after a brief intermission, the crowd was treated to a set by the show's headliner: Miss Diana Ross.
FEATURES
October 22, 1991
* Accept the validity of your feelings; it's not abnormal to be upset.* Talk about what's going on, with family and friends; give and get emotional support, and try to understand that what's happening is not caused by your failure; the economic situation is affecting others in the same way.* Maintain your physical health: That means good nutrition, normal sleeping habits, regular check-ups, continuing whatever medical regimen you're on.* Exercise. It'll help you work off some tension, contribute to your general well-being, help you relax.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | December 16, 2001
While most homeowners associations are content to provide residents with swimming pools, walking paths and other ordinary suburban niceties, the Columbia Association has always dished up a richer smorgasbord of services. The association offers before- and after-school day care. It helps students from the Howard County community travel to sister cities in Spain and France. It runs a day spa - complete with massage and sea-salt scrubs. For years, the association operated a bus service. Now comes something even further afield from the parks-and-recreation basics: group therapy.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | July 14, 1998
Two of Howard County's most vocal anti-violence agencies have formed a partnership aimed at keeping at-risk teen-agers out of trouble and out of jail.The Domestic Violence Center of Howard County and the Sexual Trauma Treatment, Advocacy and Recovery Center (STTAR) have received a $55,000 grant to fund Youth Intervention Partnership, a 10-week group therapy program for high-risk youth.The partnership between STTAR and the Domestic Violence Center is a logical one, said Cheryl DePetro, STTAR's executive director.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | July 7, 1998
LOUIS L. GOLDSTEIN'S great secret was knowing that politics is a branch office of theater. William Donald Schaefer knows this, and so do Kweisi Mfume and Barbara Mikulski and, in his day, so did Hyman Pressman.Pressman, the late city comptroller, was a poem composed on an adding machine. Goldstein, the late state comptroller who died Friday night of a heart attack at 85, was a shrewdie posing as a corny hayseed while simultaneously looking to outsmart every city boy in the room."Don't believe all that country boy stuff," all the wise heads in Annapolis always said.
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