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By William R. Macklin and William R. Macklin,KNIGHT-RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 7, 2000
PHILADELPHIA - The new policy requiring Philadelphia public school students to wear uniforms has the backing of the mayor, the endorsement of many parents and teachers, and enough wiggle room to allow reluctant high schoolers to come up with their own designs and colors. What it lacks is the informed opinion of psychologists who have studied uniforms and how they affect people. Some researchers caution that the plan to have different clothing schemes for different schools might lead to mean-spirited rivalries and even make targets of some students.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
The U.S. Department of Education has opened a formal investigation into the Johns Hopkins University's response to an alleged rape at a fraternity house, the university disclosed Tuesday. A group of students filed a complaint with the department's Office of Civil Rights earlier this year, arguing that the university had violated the Clery Act and Title IX, federal laws that dictate how crimes like sexual assault should be handled by universities and reported to the public. Officials said they were notified of the investigation on Friday.
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NEWS
June 26, 2005
A group of students from Francis Scott Key High School will open a time capsule at Runnymede Elementary School between 2 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. today. The students will gather to dig up the time capsule they buried nine years ago as third-graders at Runnymede, 3000 Langdon Drive, outside Taneytown. About 25 students were in the class.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2012
A 19-year-old student from Baltimore Polytechnic High School told police he was beaten by two separate groups of juveniles from a rival school in downtown Baltimore on Thursday afternoon, an attack that comes amid a pitched debate over downtown safety. According to police, the student was walking in the 200 block of W. Fayette St., a block north of the First Mariner Arena, before 4:20 p.m. when he said he was attacked from behind by an unknown male. Nine other juveniles joined in as he tried to defend himself, and his phone was taken during the attack, he told police.  Moments later, police say, an MTA bus stopped in the block and a juvenile male wearing a Digital Harbor High School shirt "forced open the door and got off the bus," followed by 19 other juveniles wearing Digital Harbor shirts, who again assaulted the victim, police said.  Anthony Guglielmi, a city police spokesman, said the victim told the police he was attacked because of a rivalry between the two schools.
NEWS
By Karin Remesch and Karin Remesch,Staff writer | April 7, 1991
Spending three weeks in Harford County might have been a new experience for a group of students from Hildesheim, Germany, but for one of their chaperons it was a homecoming.While the students gained first-hand impressions of American family and school life, Sandra Seilerenjoyed getting reacquainted with former colleagues and students.The former Sandra Siegert, who taught Spanish and lower-level German for four years at John Carroll School, was used to escorting American students to Germany, but this year she experienced the program from the other side of the Atlantic when she, along with her husband, Matthias Seiler, accompanied the German students on their visit to the United States.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,Sun Staff Writer | April 25, 1995
Groups of sixth-graders at Linthicum Elementary School pushed and pulled toothpicks and marshmallows yesterday, trying to build a bridge that would support a box of pennies and resist the urge to eat the marshmallows at the same time.They were among students throughout the county getting a glimpse of life as an engineer as part of Discover E program, started in 1990 by the National Society of Professional Engineers to encourage students to pursue careers in engineering.Engineers from Westinghouse have visited six schools in Anne Arundel County this year, showing students videos, conducting hands-on experiments and explaining their jobs.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Tanika White and Lisa Goldberg and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2001
Six Mount Hebron High School students were arrested at school yesterday and accused of participating in a beating that sent a former student to Maryland Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore, police said. The arrest of the six teen-age boys from Ellicott City brings to eight the number of youths arrested after the Wednesday attack on 18-year-old Sean Heidari of Ellicott City. Howard County police spokeswoman Sherry Llewellyn said police do not expect to make more arrests. Heidari, who was briefly hospitalized with cuts and bruises and a small puncture wound in the back of his head, has been discharged from the hospital, according to a spokeswoman.
NEWS
November 4, 1990
MOUNT AIRY - Mount Airy Middle School students who read for almost four hours one Friday evening to raise money for the Susan Hornick Fund were lauded during an assembly last Monday.Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, director of the Maryland Student Service Alliance, congratulated the 139 students who raised a final total of $6,508.26 for the Mount Airy woman suffering from leukemia.When teacher Jackie Ensor, chairperson for the read-a-thon, held up the oversized check for the school to see, the students burst into applause and cheers.
NEWS
April 18, 1994
School: Glenelg High SchoolHometown: GlenelgAge: 17 Meagan serves as president of the school's Student Government Association. She has been involved in the organization since she entered high school. She was a student representative to the Board of Education last year."I thought it was a good way to get around and meet people," she said. "I'm interested in politics. It helps to get involved now."She is editorial page editor of the school newspaper, the Shield, and is active in peer mediation.
NEWS
December 20, 1993
DAWN HARNER, 13, daughter of Dennis and Mary Harner, of Harney Road in Taneytown.School: eighth-grader at Northwest Middle School.Honored for: Being "an all-around good student who puts forth a great deal of effort in all that she does," said Principal Bronson Jones.Dawn is a member of a group of students who alternate reading the morning announcements on closed-circuit television in a news-style format.She also has volunteered in the past for "AM Help," in which she tutored fellow students who were having trouble keeping up with class work.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN REPORTER | July 2, 2008
Maryland schools with only a small group of students who can't pass state tests will no longer be labeled as failing and be forced to make draconian changes under a plan approved yesterday by the U.S. Department of Education. Maryland was one of six states given permission to use a new way of classifying their schools when they don't meet No Child Left Behind standards. The highly technical changes are likely to have sweeping ramifications for schools in the state that don't meet standards, particularly as the standards rise in the coming years until the school year 2013-2014, when all children in the nation will be expected to pass the tests.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Reporter | June 11, 2008
Gabrielle Keiran Dreistadt, a Wilde Lake Middle School honor student who worked with abused animals and through her church assisted senior citizens and others who needed a spare hand, died of aplastic anemia Thursday at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Columbia resident was 12. Gabrielle, who was born and raised in Columbia, was diagnosed in March with the disease that took her life. Aplastic anemia occurs when bone marrow fails to produce sufficient blood cells. "She was a strong and healthy girl who suddenly got sick," said her mother, Holly Anne Conti of Columbia.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,Sun Reporter | April 4, 2007
At Thurgood Marshall High, where reading scores are routinely low, an ambitious group of mostly sophomores and juniors are in a club they say grows more exclusive and popular every day. To hear members of the school's all-male book club tell it, Thurgood Marshall's library - home to meetings that take place every two months - is the place to be seen. "The girls in the school are upset," said junior Derrell Brown. "They want to know why they can't get copies of the books we read." Brown, 18, is an original member of the two-year-old club, which school administrators and organizers say has increased interest in reading throughout the school.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV | January 7, 2007
After 10 years of encouraging academic excellence among ethnic minority male high school students at Oakland Mills, the Alpha Achievers will celebrate Jan. 14 and take a bow. The group -- made up of students with at least a 3.0 grade point average -- will celebrate from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. in the Oakland Mills High School cafeteria. Alumni and current members will get a chance to interact and reminisce. The event costs $10. "It will be a little bit of history," said Vincent James, a guidance counselor at Oakland Mills High who volunteered to be the adviser for the group.
NEWS
June 26, 2005
A group of students from Francis Scott Key High School will open a time capsule at Runnymede Elementary School between 2 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. today. The students will gather to dig up the time capsule they buried nine years ago as third-graders at Runnymede, 3000 Langdon Drive, outside Taneytown. About 25 students were in the class.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2005
Amid shrieking machinery, teenagers hustle around, wielding nail guns in the bedroom, screwing hinges in the bathroom and installing lights in the hallway. This is the house that CAT North built. At Anne Arundel County's Center for Applied Technology North, about 100 students in construction-trades programs such as plumbing and carpentry are practicing their skills on a house that will be sold to and inhabited by real homebuyers. That knowledge has filled students with motivation for their work.
NEWS
By David Smith and Linda Hooper | April 22, 2001
WHITWELL, Tenn. -- "Please add this paper clip to your collection. It is in memory of my bigoted grandfather who ..." "These paper clips are in memory of an entire Polish village that was herded into the village church and exterminated. Thank you for making sure no one ever forgets." These are only two examples of the pain expressed in many of the more than 8,000 letters that have been received at Whitwell Middle School in the past three years in response to the school's project to commemorate the Holocaust.
NEWS
By Jean Thompson and Jean Thompson,Sun Staff Writer | July 27, 1995
Sylvan Learning Systems Inc. yesterday won approval from the Board of Estimates for its $9 million expansion this fall in Baltimore schools.With Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke absent and Council President Mary Pat Clarke abstaining, the board approved a set of three-year contracts for new school-based tutoring centers.With related contracts approved last month, the decision allows Sylvan to expand from 14 centers to 29 centers serving about 4,000 Baltimore students in 25 schools, most of them middle schools.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | February 14, 2005
For the past five years, Dianna Ford has looked for ways to communicate with parents of Patterson High School's growing immigrant Latino student population. The guidance department head hired a Spanish-speaking intern away from a community center; bought electronic headsets so parents who did not understand English could listen to PTA meetings through an interpreter; and established a Latino parents group. Last spring, the school - where 8 percent of students are "English language learners" - became even more creative in its outreach efforts.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | May 9, 2004
Faced with a nasty new world of bad behavior in its schools -- from cyberbullying to assaults on teachers -- the Anne Arundel County school board is revamping its Code of Student Conduct for the first time in at least six years. Features of the proposed code include offenses involving modern technology, such as the misuse of computers and camera cellular phones, and infractions not explicitly stated in the current code, such as hazing and displaying the Confederate flag. The revised code also would give school administrators more guidance on what penalties to assign.
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