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NEWS
July 9, 1994
The rationale for the Group of Seven annual summit does not apply to today's meeting in Naples. The economies of Western )) Europe, North America and Japan are moderately upbeat after years of stagnation. The heads of seven governments could more likely upset this fragile optimism than invigorate it.For this reason, President Clinton was careful to let various constituencies know that no help is expected for a defense of the dollar, and no breakthrough in open markets expected with Japan.
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NEWS
July 31, 1996
THE ATLANTA BOMBER had good reason to chortle yesterday as all the good intentions "to do something about terrorism" got ensnared in Washington politics really attuned to an earlier time.Republicans remained intimidated by the National Rifle Association and its objections to the use of chemical markers to show the origin of explosive materials. And civil libertarians, left and right, chafed against expanded federal wiretapping powers.Meanwhile, at an anti-terrorism meeting of eight major nations in Paris, Canadian Foreign Minister Lloyd Axworthy told how his 11-year-old son learned bomb-making on the Internet.
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BUSINESS
By Steven Greenhouse and Steven Greenhouse,New York Times News Service | February 15, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The United States and other Group of Seven nations have begun laying the groundwork for a multibillion-dollar fund to stabilize the enfeebled Russian ruble, and some officials say such a fund might be set up in three to four months.When President Boris N. Yeltsin of Russia visited Washington two weeks ago, he and his economic aides strenuously urged the United States to help set up a fund that would, in effect, back the ruble with foreign money and so reduce economic and political instability during Russia's long and difficult winter.
NEWS
June 29, 1996
TERRORISM KNOWS no borders. Its money, operatives, training, materials and advocacy slither from one nation to another, exploiting the gaps between national police efforts. President Clinton was right to divert the Group of Seven summit from its economic agenda long enough to achieve a joint statement promising to combine to fight terrorism by all legal means. A conference at the justice minister level in July should make this promise real.Partly this was electioneering by Mr. Clinton, but it was still the right thing to do. The terrorism provoking summit action took American victims with an aim of destabilizing Saudi Arabia.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Contributing Writer | July 7, 1992
MUNICH, Germany -- Martin Khor has found that there is little place for a Malaysian journalist when the West's top leaders get TC together for their annual summit.Unlike his Western counterparts, Mr. Khor cannot watch the seven heads of state hobnob over breakfast or read their plans for the world economy. Although the summit will affect his home country's economy, he and other journalists from poor countries are excluded because the summit organizers give the coveted press passes for the leaders' meetings only to Westerners.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | April 26, 1995
At last talk radio has found a subject worthy of it: talk radio.If the Group of Seven cannot manage the dollar-yen relationship or even try, it cannot justify the cost of meeting.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | July 7, 1994
The invasion of Haiti will commence when Bill is at the Group of Seven.Some people think the Hutu should rule Rwanda, some the Tutsi, but nobody thinks the French should.Responsible governments are telling the Serbs to accept peace or else, as they have been for two years.Cheer up. The turnover in the Maryland General Assembly will be the greatest in 20 years.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | July 8, 1993
We call ourselves the world's only superpower and we canno even contain Ol' Man River.Somebody forgot to tell the NAACP that you don't play football without getting hit.The U.S. and Egypt each want the other to deal with Sheik Omar. His followers notice these things and rejoice.The good news is a partial trade agreement. The bad news is ditto.Japan goes into the Group of Seven meeting with no government, and therefore incapable of making concessions. Brilliant.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH POND | July 8, 1992
Munich, Germany. -- Of all the losers at the economic summit in Munich this week, Japan and Ukraine are the worst off.Almost everybody is a loser, of course. The leaders of the seven industrialized democracies, Britain's John Major excepted, have never been so unpopular at home. They run listless economies, yet they are too weak to conclude their six-year-long negotiations and make the final concessions on tariffs and non-tariff barriers that could stimulate global trade and growth.The third world, too, is getting short shrift as the West focuses on the more dramatic misery of the ex-Soviet Union.
NEWS
June 29, 1996
TERRORISM KNOWS no borders. Its money, operatives, training, materials and advocacy slither from one nation to another, exploiting the gaps between national police efforts. President Clinton was right to divert the Group of Seven summit from its economic agenda long enough to achieve a joint statement promising to combine to fight terrorism by all legal means. A conference at the justice minister level in July should make this promise real.Partly this was electioneering by Mr. Clinton, but it was still the right thing to do. The terrorism provoking summit action took American victims with an aim of destabilizing Saudi Arabia.
NEWS
June 21, 1995
Things fall apart in the world economy more quickly and on a larger scale thanks to the communications revolution. World institutions need to be equipped to handle bigger emergencies faster. The Group of Seven summit in Halifax last week, acting as the caucus of powers that really run the International Monetary Fund and World Bank, tried to oblige. How well it did will be answered in the next Mexico-scale currency crisis.The major accomplishment was to recommend doubling the IMF "arrangements to borrow" to $56 billion, for faster and larger action to combat the next major currency collapse.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | April 26, 1995
At last talk radio has found a subject worthy of it: talk radio.If the Group of Seven cannot manage the dollar-yen relationship or even try, it cannot justify the cost of meeting.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 10, 1994
NAPLES, Italy -- Describing the toll of unemployed in their countries as an "unacceptable waste," leaders of the Group of Seven leading industrial democracies agreed yesterday to pursue policies to keep a nascent economic recovery on track, encourage growth and create jobs.Then, joined by President Boris N. Yeltsin of Russia, they turned to global political problems, though their talks were overshadowed by the death of the president of North Korea, Kim Il Sung, and uncertainty about his country's plans to develop nuclear weapons.
NEWS
July 9, 1994
The rationale for the Group of Seven annual summit does not apply to today's meeting in Naples. The economies of Western )) Europe, North America and Japan are moderately upbeat after years of stagnation. The heads of seven governments could more likely upset this fragile optimism than invigorate it.For this reason, President Clinton was careful to let various constituencies know that no help is expected for a defense of the dollar, and no breakthrough in open markets expected with Japan.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | July 7, 1994
The invasion of Haiti will commence when Bill is at the Group of Seven.Some people think the Hutu should rule Rwanda, some the Tutsi, but nobody thinks the French should.Responsible governments are telling the Serbs to accept peace or else, as they have been for two years.Cheer up. The turnover in the Maryland General Assembly will be the greatest in 20 years.
BUSINESS
By Bernard D. Kaplan and Bernard D. Kaplan,Hearst Newspapers | July 6, 1994
PARIS -- This week's economic summit could accelerate the dollar's current slide and wreak more damage than if the conference of the world's seven biggest economic powers were not being held at all.Among the signs that the Group of Seven meeting, which starts Friday in Naples, Italy, could worsen matters:* The German government's unexpected declaration Monday predicting that the world leaders at the summit will not take concerted action to prop up the...
NEWS
June 21, 1995
Things fall apart in the world economy more quickly and on a larger scale thanks to the communications revolution. World institutions need to be equipped to handle bigger emergencies faster. The Group of Seven summit in Halifax last week, acting as the caucus of powers that really run the International Monetary Fund and World Bank, tried to oblige. How well it did will be answered in the next Mexico-scale currency crisis.The major accomplishment was to recommend doubling the IMF "arrangements to borrow" to $56 billion, for faster and larger action to combat the next major currency collapse.
NEWS
July 8, 1993
LEADERS of the Group of 7, currently summiteering in Tokyo, are often described as heading "the world's seven wealthiest nations."Well, that all depends on how you're counting.Traditionally, economies were compared by using exchange rates to convert their output into dollars. Doing things that way, the G-7 members are the top seven in gross domestic product; in order: United States, Japan, Germany, France, Italy, Britain and Canada. (Canada, by the way, barely edges out Spain).But the International Monetary Fund recently completed a study which ranks nations' economies in a new way. The new system, popular with academic economists, ranks countries by "purchasing power parity" -- what a country's currency will buy in goods and services.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | July 8, 1993
We call ourselves the world's only superpower and we canno even contain Ol' Man River.Somebody forgot to tell the NAACP that you don't play football without getting hit.The U.S. and Egypt each want the other to deal with Sheik Omar. His followers notice these things and rejoice.The good news is a partial trade agreement. The bad news is ditto.Japan goes into the Group of Seven meeting with no government, and therefore incapable of making concessions. Brilliant.
NEWS
July 8, 1993
LEADERS of the Group of 7, currently summiteering in Tokyo, are often described as heading "the world's seven wealthiest nations."Well, that all depends on how you're counting.Traditionally, economies were compared by using exchange rates to convert their output into dollars. Doing things that way, the G-7 members are the top seven in gross domestic product; in order: United States, Japan, Germany, France, Italy, Britain and Canada. (Canada, by the way, barely edges out Spain).But the International Monetary Fund recently completed a study which ranks nations' economies in a new way. The new system, popular with academic economists, ranks countries by "purchasing power parity" -- what a country's currency will buy in goods and services.
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