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BUSINESS
By Patricia Meisol and David Conn and Patricia Meisol and David Conn,Staff Writers | October 15, 1993
The chief executive officer of a Towson insurance agency, Charter Group Inc., has disappeared amid allegations that up to $1.1 million is missing from the company.The CEO, Hamilton Schmidt, 38, a part owner of the company, was last seen by his sister about a month ago when he left his house to drive to work. The car has not been recovered, and since then, the company's assets have been purchased by another insurance agency.The new owner, Benedict Rosenberg, president of Insurance Inc. of Timonium, said yesterday he is negotiating to make good on premiums paid by at least one Charter customer that were never forwarded to the insurance company providing coverage.
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BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,jay.hancock@baltsun.com | August 21, 2009
Joining employers across Maryland who are feeling another year of health-insurance pain, Groove Commerce will see its medical premiums rise 20 percent on Sept. 1. The 10-person online marketing firm is less than three years old. CEO Ethan Giffin is trying to build the business in the worst recession in decades. A key cost that goes up 13 times the rate of core inflation isn't exactly helping. "I want to operate a company that provides for its employees and has great benefits and makes people feel welcome and a part of something," Giffin says.
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BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney | July 16, 1991
Because inaccurate information was supplied to The Sun, yesterday's editions inaccurately stated the policy amount of insurance sold by Mutual Benefit Life Insurance Co. in Maryland. Mutual Benefit has $1.12 billion of life insurance in effect in the state, including about $966 million in group insurance and $158 million in individual life insurance coverage.The Sun regrets the errors.Mutual Benefit Life Insurance Co. has $9.6 billion worth of insurance policies outstanding in Maryland, but competitors and state officials agreed that the impact on Marylanders of the New Jersey-based insurer's failure will be slight.
NEWS
February 17, 2006
John Stewart Bannister, a retired insurance executive and decorated World War II veteran, died of an infection Feb. 9 at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Ruxton resident was 84. Mr. Bannister was born in Pittsfield, Mass., and raised in Essex, Mass. While attending the University of Chicago, he was drafted into the Army during the early days of World War II. He served with the 123rd Infantry and participated in the New Guinea and Philippines campaigns. He was decorated with a Bronze Star with three battle stars after leading a squad of men into enemy territory where they were successful in securing needed information.
NEWS
February 17, 2006
John Stewart Bannister, a retired insurance executive and decorated World War II veteran, died of an infection Feb. 9 at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Ruxton resident was 84. Mr. Bannister was born in Pittsfield, Mass., and raised in Essex, Mass. While attending the University of Chicago, he was drafted into the Army during the early days of World War II. He served with the 123rd Infantry and participated in the New Guinea and Philippines campaigns. He was decorated with a Bronze Star with three battle stars after leading a squad of men into enemy territory where they were successful in securing needed information.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | October 6, 1994
In a setback for backers of universal access to health insurance, a state task force is preparing to recommend that insurance companies not be required to sell individual health insurance policies to all comers, and that insurers keep the right to refuse to serve customers with pre-existing medical conditions.The plan would also let insurers continue to charge different prices to individual customers based on where they live, how old they are, and their family status.The changes proposed for individual health insurance rules are less sweeping than the reforms that went into place for small group insurance plans in July.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | February 10, 1993
What is a four-letter word for "part of a waiter's foot?"Or a 10-letter word for "light, fruity, wine?"Or the 5-letter answer to the clue, "they give out stars?"These were some of questions I struggled with recently in the crossword puzzle section of a new publication, Hospitality. It is the newsletter of the Waiters Association, a freshly formed organization based in Takoma Park, aimed at improving the lot of the nation's estimated 1.7 million waiters.The newsletter is the work of Vivienne Wildes.
NEWS
February 16, 1996
Patient should pay for extra careIn reference to the Jan. 28 letter, "Insurance firms value profits more than babies," I would like to say that as a member of a group insurance plan I have followed the debate surrounding early hospital discharge of new mothers and babies with great interest. While I understand the desirability of keeping postpartum women in the hospital longer than 24 hours, I also recognize the need to cut costs. There is, however, a solution. Let the patient pay for the extra day out of pocket.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,SUN STAFF | June 4, 2003
Maryland is preparing to switch next month to a new program to provide health insurance to those rejected for coverage because of their medical history, but the change is leading to some confusion as well as complaints about rising premiums. Beginning July 1, the Maryland Health Insurance Plan will replace a longtime state program known as SAAC, which stands for "substantial, available and affordable coverage." SAAC, launched in the mid-1970s, was designed to provide coverage for those whose medical histories made them ineligible for regular policies.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,jay.hancock@baltsun.com | August 21, 2009
Joining employers across Maryland who are feeling another year of health-insurance pain, Groove Commerce will see its medical premiums rise 20 percent on Sept. 1. The 10-person online marketing firm is less than three years old. CEO Ethan Giffin is trying to build the business in the worst recession in decades. A key cost that goes up 13 times the rate of core inflation isn't exactly helping. "I want to operate a company that provides for its employees and has great benefits and makes people feel welcome and a part of something," Giffin says.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,SUN STAFF | June 4, 2003
Maryland is preparing to switch next month to a new program to provide health insurance to those rejected for coverage because of their medical history, but the change is leading to some confusion as well as complaints about rising premiums. Beginning July 1, the Maryland Health Insurance Plan will replace a longtime state program known as SAAC, which stands for "substantial, available and affordable coverage." SAAC, launched in the mid-1970s, was designed to provide coverage for those whose medical histories made them ineligible for regular policies.
NEWS
October 28, 1999
WHY is the Injured Workers Insurance Fund the only seller of insurance in Maryland not regulated by the insurance commissioner? IWIF was created by the state; its board members are appointed by the governor. Yet no regulators oversee its finances or procedures.That's wrong, and dangerous. IWIF sells workers compensation insurance policies to any businesses seeking them. What happens if its decisions lead to losses? How would we know if irregularities existed?At the moment, the public and state regulators are kept in the dark.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | June 6, 1997
A survey of health insurers covering small employee groups showed that costs per employee increased 3.35 percent last year over 1995, says a report by the state Health Care Access and Cost Commission.Medical costs also increased faster than premiums, growing from 83 percent of premiums to 91.1 percent, the survey found.Because of that, "we expect more premium increases, but how extensive [they will be], we don't know yet," said John M. Colmers, the commission's executive director.The commission was established in 1993 in a state health insurance reform that created a standard benefits package for "small group" policies, those covering between 2 and 50 employees.
NEWS
February 16, 1996
Patient should pay for extra careIn reference to the Jan. 28 letter, "Insurance firms value profits more than babies," I would like to say that as a member of a group insurance plan I have followed the debate surrounding early hospital discharge of new mothers and babies with great interest. While I understand the desirability of keeping postpartum women in the hospital longer than 24 hours, I also recognize the need to cut costs. There is, however, a solution. Let the patient pay for the extra day out of pocket.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | October 6, 1994
In a setback for backers of universal access to health insurance, a state task force is preparing to recommend that insurance companies not be required to sell individual health insurance policies to all comers, and that insurers keep the right to refuse to serve customers with pre-existing medical conditions.The plan would also let insurers continue to charge different prices to individual customers based on where they live, how old they are, and their family status.The changes proposed for individual health insurance rules are less sweeping than the reforms that went into place for small group insurance plans in July.
BUSINESS
By Patricia Meisol and David Conn and Patricia Meisol and David Conn,Staff Writers | October 15, 1993
The chief executive officer of a Towson insurance agency, Charter Group Inc., has disappeared amid allegations that up to $1.1 million is missing from the company.The CEO, Hamilton Schmidt, 38, a part owner of the company, was last seen by his sister about a month ago when he left his house to drive to work. The car has not been recovered, and since then, the company's assets have been purchased by another insurance agency.The new owner, Benedict Rosenberg, president of Insurance Inc. of Timonium, said yesterday he is negotiating to make good on premiums paid by at least one Charter customer that were never forwarded to the insurance company providing coverage.
BUSINESS
October 22, 1990
One on One is a weekly feature offering excerpts of interviews conducted by The Evening Sun with newsworthy business leaders. Janelle Cousino is executive director of the Maryland Citizen Action Coalition, a 10-year-old consumer advocacy group with 67,000 members statewide. It is affiliated with the national organization Citizen Action.Q. You're known for your efforts in the legislature concerning automobile and health insurance. What are your goals in the upcoming legislative session?A. We want to make the insurance relationship with consumers fairer.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | June 6, 1997
A survey of health insurers covering small employee groups showed that costs per employee increased 3.35 percent last year over 1995, says a report by the state Health Care Access and Cost Commission.Medical costs also increased faster than premiums, growing from 83 percent of premiums to 91.1 percent, the survey found.Because of that, "we expect more premium increases, but how extensive [they will be], we don't know yet," said John M. Colmers, the commission's executive director.The commission was established in 1993 in a state health insurance reform that created a standard benefits package for "small group" policies, those covering between 2 and 50 employees.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | February 10, 1993
What is a four-letter word for "part of a waiter's foot?"Or a 10-letter word for "light, fruity, wine?"Or the 5-letter answer to the clue, "they give out stars?"These were some of questions I struggled with recently in the crossword puzzle section of a new publication, Hospitality. It is the newsletter of the Waiters Association, a freshly formed organization based in Takoma Park, aimed at improving the lot of the nation's estimated 1.7 million waiters.The newsletter is the work of Vivienne Wildes.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney | July 16, 1991
Because inaccurate information was supplied to The Sun, yesterday's editions inaccurately stated the policy amount of insurance sold by Mutual Benefit Life Insurance Co. in Maryland. Mutual Benefit has $1.12 billion of life insurance in effect in the state, including about $966 million in group insurance and $158 million in individual life insurance coverage.The Sun regrets the errors.Mutual Benefit Life Insurance Co. has $9.6 billion worth of insurance policies outstanding in Maryland, but competitors and state officials agreed that the impact on Marylanders of the New Jersey-based insurer's failure will be slight.
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