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Tim Wheeler | November 12, 2013
The Chesapeake Bay's cleanup may be delayed "several decades" by the slow pace at which farm pollution is being flushed from ground water on the Delmarva Peninsula, a new study says. The research by the U.S. Geological Survey also suggests pollution control efforts on Eastern Shore farms may need to be increased in order to achieve hoped-for water quality improvements. Using a computer model to simulate ground-water flows, USGS scientists found that when nitrogen from fertilized farm fields on the Shore soaks into the ground, it takes 20 to 40 years on average for the nutrient-laden water to make its way underground into streams and rivers.  Ground water now oozing into bay tributaries is likely carrying pollution picked up by rainfall decades ago, researchers said.
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Tim Wheeler | November 14, 2013
A public meeting tonight (Thursday) will give city residents a chance to ask questions about environmental safeguards for developing Harbor Point, a former factory site in Fells Point where toxic chromium remains entombed underground. The meeting , arranged by Councilman James B. Kraft, is to be held from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. in the Morgan Stanley building at 1300 Thames St. The session, postponed from last month because of the federal government shutdown, will cover plans by Beatty Development Group to build a 22-story tower on the site of the former Allied chromium processing plant.
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By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff Writer | August 28, 1992
Annapolis officials are negotiating with state environmental regulators to monitor and contain contaminated ground water at the city landfill as they prepare to close it at the end of the year.The city is working out the last details in an agreement with the Maryland Department of the Environment to shut the 70-acre facility Dec. 31, even though the mayor and City Council still hope to expand it eventually.Like many other old landfills, the Annapolis disposal site was built without a protective plastic liner.
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Tim Wheeler | November 12, 2013
The Chesapeake Bay's cleanup may be delayed "several decades" by the slow pace at which farm pollution is being flushed from ground water on the Delmarva Peninsula, a new study says. The research by the U.S. Geological Survey also suggests pollution control efforts on Eastern Shore farms may need to be increased in order to achieve hoped-for water quality improvements. Using a computer model to simulate ground-water flows, USGS scientists found that when nitrogen from fertilized farm fields on the Shore soaks into the ground, it takes 20 to 40 years on average for the nutrient-laden water to make its way underground into streams and rivers.  Ground water now oozing into bay tributaries is likely carrying pollution picked up by rainfall decades ago, researchers said.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,Sun Staff Writer | August 5, 1994
With an apparent about-face in community relations, lawyers and consultants for Black and Decker (U.S.) Inc. promised neighbors of its Hampstead facility last night that the company will be more open about its plans to clean up contamination in the ground water there.Residents who have long been skeptical of the cleanup said that they were satisfied with a detailed explanation offered during a public hearing last night by Thomas Lynch III, a Frederick attorney representing Black and Decker, and Randy McAlister, a private consultant who developed the company's plan.
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By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | November 20, 1998
Hayfields Country Club will have no adverse impact on the ground water, the Baltimore County Board of Appeals said yesterday.Responding to an order from Maryland's second highest court that the board review the case again, the three-member panel agreed that the ground water beneath the Hunt Valley facility is protected by a layer of clay, and that with proper management, the golf course will pose no risk.The decision, to be issued in writing in about 10 days, apparently puts to rest the last unresolved question regarding the Hayfields project.
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By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1999
A hydrogeologist delivered news yesterday that only schoolchildren would want to hear: Carroll will need several snowy days this winter to get its water supply back to normal."
NEWS
By Samuel Goldreich and Samuel Goldreich,Staff writer | July 21, 1991
The Army plans to pump out and treat ground water in the Edgewood area of Aberdeen Proving Ground that is contaminating a creek with mustard gas agent and other dumped toxins.The proposal is designed tostop further pollution of Watson Creek until technology is developedto clean up the Old O-Field on the base. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency placed the O-Field on its Superfund list of the nation's most hazardous waste sites in February 1990.The 4.5-acre O-Field was used in the 1940s and 1950s as a dump site for chemical warfare agents, munitions and other hazardous wastes left over from the proving ground's military testing programs.
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By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | March 16, 1999
Concerned that the remnants of an abandoned dump might foul ground water that feeds residential wells, state environmental officials have told the Har Sinai congregation to develop a plan to clean pollutants from the site of its proposed synagogue and day care center in rural northwest Baltimore County.Maryland Department of the Environment officials said they will not certify that environmental concerns have been addressed at the historic congregation's 17-acre site until the dump's fill area has been removed.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff writer | March 17, 1991
With most of the chemicals once stored in a Gaither home on their way to incineration in South Carolina and assurances from public agencies that no ground water was contaminated, residents are markedly lessworried than they were two months ago.In sharp contrast to a packed meeting in early January, only eight residents showed up Thursdaynight to hear officials tell them that the cleanup of the Small homeand storage shed had been completed. Both meetings were at the Sykesville-Freedom District Fire Hall and featured the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Maryland Department of the Environment, and countyhealth and environment departments.
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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2013
A public meeting on environmental safeguards for redeveloping a Fells Point former factory site has been reset for Nov. 14, Baltimore City Council member James B. Kraft has announced. The meeting on the Harbor Point project is to be held from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. in the Morgan Stanley building at 1300 Thames St. The session, which was postponed from last month because of the federal government shutdown, will cover plans by Beatty Development Group to build a 22-story tower on the site of the former Allied chromium processing plant.
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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2013
Plans for developing a former Baltimore chemical plant now known as Harbor Point will be aired Wednesday as the developer and government regulators explain safeguards planned to prevent release of contaminated soil and ground water beneath the site. An "open house" meeting is scheduled from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Morgan Stanley building, 1300 Thames Street. Representatives of Beatty Development Group, the Maryland Department of the Environment and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency are expected to be on hand to answer individuals' questions, though there will be no formal presentations or public forum on the controversial project.
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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2013
The developer planning to build an office tower at Harbor Point agreed Wednesday night to hold another public meeting on the controversial project after Fells Point residents who showed up for an open house there demanded a more formal discussion of the safety of developing the former chemical plant site. Councilman James B. Kraft, who represents Fells Point and who also attended the open house, pressed for the meeting after saying he wanted to give his constituents an opportunity to have their questions answered about precautions planned for keeping contaminated soil and ground water from being released by the project.
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By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2013
Despite pending legal challenges, the developers of Baltimore's casino formally began construction Wednesday on the planned $400 million gambling complex near the two stadiums. Chad Barnhill, general manager of the Horseshoe Casino Baltimore, said lawsuits alleging environmental risks briefly caused a delay in construction plans, but the 335,000 square-foot complex remains on track for opening in the middle of 2014. “There's always the concern, but we have a great team and we'll get past those hurdles,” Barnhill said of the litigation.
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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2013
State environmental officials are drilling monitoring wells on the outskirts of Salisbury to get a better handle on ground-water contamination there that has fouled dozens of household wells with a potentially cancer-causing chemical, according to a spokesman. The Maryland Department of the Environment has contracted to install a total of 10 wells in the residential area south of the city to gather more information on the movement and severity of contaminated ground water, said Jay Apperson, the agency's deputy communications director.
NEWS
April 23, 2012
Last year, when Gov.Martin O'Malley signed an executive order establishing a commission to study the impact of drilling for natural gas in Western Maryland's Marcellus Shale deposit, he promised the state would be guided by "scientific knowledge. " Yet gathering that much-needed information costs money, something the state doesn't have at the moment. That lack of funds will likely mean many months of delay for the fact-finding efforts of the governor's advisory commission. The alternative - to simply not do a thorough study of such issues as the potential economic effects of fracking, the disposal of toxic waste water, and the impact on local ground water - would be wholly unacceptable.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | September 3, 1999
Gov. Parris N. Glendening has lifted the watering ban in Maryland, but no one has canceled the drought. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) reported yesterday that the stream flows that surged in parts of Maryland after last week's cloudbursts are dropping back to levels that prevailed before the storms. The heavy rains also had little effect on the state's ground water levels, which continue to drop, the agency said. "The rivers are clearly returning to where they were before the rains hit," said USGS spokesman Gary Fisher.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | August 14, 1998
State environmental officials filed suit yesterday against Allen Family Foods Inc., accusing the Delaware-based company of willfully contaminating ground water on the Eastern Shore with wastewater from its chicken processing plant in Cordova.The lawsuit, filed by the attorney general's office, asks the Talbot County Circuit Court to grant an injunction ordering Allen to obey the law and to clean up tainted ground water in the vicinity of the farm fields where the company has been spraying its wastewater.
HEALTH
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2012
An independent panel of scientists says two government-issued studies can't show if people were harmed by toxic pollution from Fort Detrick contaminating the ground water, but further studies are unlikely to answer lingering questions about the health impacts of the cancer-causing chemicals buried decades ago at the Frederick military base. In a review sponsored by the Army, a committee of environmental and health experts with the National Research Council took issue with a study by the U.S. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, which concluded that tainted ground water seeping out from Detrick's Area B was "unlikely to have produced any harmful health effects, including cancer.
NEWS
March 9, 2011
In his column ("Hydraulic fracturing: a tale of corporate power and citizen powerlessness," March 8), a University of Maryland Baltimore County political science teacher restates a host of baseless and debunked claims from the anti-natural gas film "Gasland. " Thomas Schaller — who's professional expertise is electoral politics, not petroleum engineering — should be aware that over the past 60 years, hydraulic fracturing has never impacted groundwater. Independent environmental regulators, top EPA officials, Environmental Defense Fund advisors, the Ground Water Protection Council and others have all confirmed this fact.
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