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By Joel P. Rawson | May 11, 1999
THERE are two wars being fought in Yugoslavia. The first is a ground war, with objectives as old as war itself: Kill your enemy, drive the survivors from the land and loot and destroy their property.Genghis Khan would understand it. Union Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman used it against the Confederacy. Adolf Hitler was one of its greatest practitioners.The Serbian police and army have driven their fellow citizens of Albanian descent from Kosovo by terror and force. Homes are burned, businesses destroyed, funds stolen, identity papers ripped to bits and more than 600,000 people forced to flee.
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NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | September 28, 2014
Bullet point opinions on the topical issues of the day, for your consideration: •Regarding America's present war footing, our military brass are saying what common sense would dictate: It's gonna be really difficult to defeat (rather than contain) ISIS without professional soldiers ultimately doing the dirty work on the ground. Which also raises the question of what if our "rent-a-moderate-Syrian-freedom fighter" strategy fails? In other words, will an anti-war president (re)
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NEWS
January 24, 1991
The reassuring word from Defense Secretary Dick Cheney and Gen. Colin Powell, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, is that the United States will resort to a ground war against Iraq only "if necessary." This welcome phrase, offered repeatedly, is especially welcome from General Powell, an Army man who in the past has bridled at Air Force boasts about being able to finish off Saddam Hussein's forces all by itself. He warned in December that any war with Iraq could be messy, requiring a U.S. ground assault all the way to Baghdad.
NEWS
July 17, 2014
The five-hour cease fire between Hamas and Israel in the Gaza Strip was the calm before the storm. Hamas rockets began raining down on Israel at the moment the United Nations-requested lull ended on Thursday afternoon. Israel waited a bit longer - three hours or so - before resuming air strikes but then followed with a long-anticipated ground offensive aimed at eliminating so-called "terror tunnels" that allow militants access to Israeli territory. For the moment, Egyptian efforts to broker a truce appear to have amounted to nothing, and the prospects for a more permanent peace appear dim, indeed.
NEWS
By Mike Klingaman and William Klingaman and Mike Klingaman and William Klingaman,Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 1991
More than half a million American soldiers in the Persian Gulf are awaiting the start of the biggest test of their lives, one for which these men and women have been preparing for the past six months.They may soon launch a ground war against Iraqi forces, fighting face to face against an enemy that so far they have seen only from the sky. Instead of dropping bombs or firing missiles from long distance, American soldiers will be forced to kill or be killed at close range.Both sides will almost certainly suffer many deaths, far more than the losses so far in Operation Desert Storm.
NEWS
By Frank Starr and Frank Starr,Chief of The Sun's Washington Bureau | February 26, 1991
An article in yesterday's Sun incorrectly stated that Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., voted against giving President Bush authority to use force in the Persian Gulf. Mr. McCain voted for the action.WASHINGTON -- An overwhelming majority of Americans -- more than 80 percent in two polls -- approve of President Bush's decision to launch the ground attack Saturday against Iraqi forces in Kuwait, and a growing majority believes the United States should force Saddam Hussein out of power.Support for President Bush and his job performance jumped after the beginning of the ground war, to 87 percent Sunday from 78 percent on Feb. 12 and 13, according to a poll for the New York Times and CBS News.
NEWS
By Charles W. Corddry and Charles W. Corddry,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 10, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Iraqi military machine and its economic underpinnings have already been so devastated that it would take as long as a generation to rebuild, according to a senior Pentagon official.Predicting that ground war would now come "fairly soon" in the Persian Gulf, this official said that the air campaign was "a week or so behind where we would like to be" at this stage of the conflict.This lag was attributed to bad weather early in the campaign and to diversion of aircraft from planned missions to seek out missile launchers hurling Scuds into Saudi Arabia and Israel.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella | February 21, 1991
Haven't we been down this road before? The waiting. The endless scenarios to ponder. The what-ifs and then-whats to consider. Even the weather charts and moon phases that we examine for clues as to when it's going to happen.Just as we held our collective breath waiting for the beginning of the Persian Gulf war, now Americans are waiting for the news that it has turned into a ground war."My anxiety has really increased since they started talking about the ground war. I felt the same thing when the war first started.
NEWS
By Gallup Organization | February 13, 1991
PRINCETON, N.J. -- As President Bush and his advisers focus on when to begin a ground offensive in the Persian Gulf war, Americans strongly favor delaying ground action by continuing to rely on air power to do the job.Nevertheless, according to the most recent Gallup Poll, most Americans thought the ground war would start soon, most continued to support Mr. Bush and U.S. involvement, and a majority felt the war should continue until Iraqi President Saddam...
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Tom Bowman and Mark Matthews and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 25, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Time has all but run out for NATO to invade Yugoslavia and fight a ground war before the start of the Balkan winter, robbing the West of its greatest threat to President Slobodan Milosevic, alliance diplomats and military officials said yesterday.Though President Clinton insisted last week that "we will not take any option off the table," the calendar is making the decision for him, requiring the United States and its NATO allies to rely on bombing and diplomacy to drive Serbian forces out of Kosovo and allow the return of ethnic Albanian refugees.
NEWS
November 19, 2012
The escalating exchange of rocket barrages and airstrikes between Israel and the Hamas militants who control the Gaza Strip threatens to erupt into an all-out ground war that destabilizes the entire region. The U.S. and its European allies, along with Egypt, Turkey and the United Nations, must do everything possible to nudge the belligerents back from the edge through diplomatic means before events spin completely out of control. No nation can allow its citizens to be attacked and killed with impunity by a foreign power that fires missiles indiscriminately across its borders at major towns and cities.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | March 21, 2011
Because the United States has no military draft — and hasn't had one since Vietnam, the one and only war stopped by popular protest — the politicians and corporations running this country continue to do as they please. They might even launch a ground war in Libya next. What's to stop them? Public opinion? Surveys show that a majority of citizens think we should get out of Iraq and Afghanistan, and that Pentagon spending should be cut. But those sentiments are at direct odds with reality, and only a tiny fraction of Americans are willing to take to the streets.
NEWS
January 7, 2009
The overnight summary of the Israel Defense Forces operations in the Gaza Strip highlights the targets successfully hit: a senior Hamas leader and architect of the group's rocket groups, several gunmen, two weapons factories and 13 storage sites, two smuggling tunnels and the homes of four Hamas commanders. What the combat tally omits is the 58 Gazans killed yesterday and the scores of women and children wounded in punishing air strikes now in their 11th day. Israel's military objective, the legitimacy of its cause - to defend its people and halt Hamas' terrorizing rocket attacks on Israeli cities - is being eclipsed by the devastation experienced by Palestinian civilians who are trapped in an impoverished peninsula with no escape.
NEWS
August 18, 2006
To watch Hezbollah's leader, Sheik Hassan Nasrallah, assume the mantle of protector of and provider for the thousands of south Lebanese left homeless by the Israeli bombing campaign is infuriating - and instructive. Infuriating because his militia provoked Israel's air and ground war with its cross-border attack and kidnapping of two Israeli soldiers, who remain captives. Instructive because his promise of housing and furniture for the war victims (financed in part by Iran) illustrates Hezbollah's standing as a state within a state and its increased political power as a result of the 34-day war. Don't expect the Lebanese government to disarm Hezbollah anytime soon, as called for in the United Nations-sanctioned cease-fire agreement.
NEWS
By CHRISTINE SPOLAR and CHRISTINE SPOLAR,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 23, 2006
TEL AVIV -- Israeli ground forces fought Hezbollah in the hills and shadows of the Lebanese countryside yesterday, with troops and tanks pushing into border villages where the Shiite militia has operated freely for years, according to military and media reports. By nightfall, Israeli military officials said the army, as it expanded a ground war, controlled Maroun al-Ras, a Hezbollah stronghold. Gunbattles between Israeli and Hezbollah forces continued at night, but soldiers secured a large weapons cache in the hilltop village, an army spokesman said.
TOPIC
By Jules Witcover and Jules Witcover,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 8, 2004
WASHINGTON -- When Maine holds its Democratic presidential caucuses today, it will be the 12th state in the past 21 days to express its choice for the party's 2004 nomination. In the next 23 days, 17 more states will do the same, by which time the nominee is likely to be known. This rush to judgment results from the determination of the party's political insiders like Democratic National Chairman Terry McAuliffe that the 2004 Democratic standard-bearer be identified as soon as possible.
NEWS
By S. M. Khalid and S. M. Khalid,Harford County Bureau of the Sun | February 25, 1991
ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND -- As the long-anticipated ground war in the Persian Gulf began to unfold, hundreds of military family members gathered yesterday at the Aberdeen Post Chapel to pray for the lives and safe return of American soldiers -- a tradition that dates back to the founding of this sprawling military complex in World War I.While many of the more than 250 people who attended services yesterday already carried the burden of months of separation from...
NEWS
By Charles W. Corddry and Charles W. Corddry,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 3, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The United States and its allies are preparing for a ground war against Iraqi forces that will rival the air campaign in use of high-tech weapons and exceed it in intensity, military authorities say.But unlike the air war, the land campaign is expected to suffer high casualties at the outset as allied armor and infantry clear Iraqi minefields, breach fortifications and penetrate enemy lines, probably on multiple fronts.The ground thrust would be closely coordinated with aerial bombing and missile strikes, using advanced Army helicopter-borne weapons as well as those employed since the start by air forces.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 26, 2001
WASHINGTON - After enduring three weeks of aerial assaults, the Taliban fighters in Afghanistan are proving a tenacious and resilient foe, leading to the increased likelihood that sustained ground action - either by anti-Taliban rebels or U.S.-led allied forces - will be needed to finally put an end to the regime. Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld said yesterday that the U.S. airstrikes are continuing to help the anti-Taliban forces mount ground offensives, while the British are poised to dispatch hundreds of commandos to join the fight.
NEWS
By Michael O'Hanlon | September 14, 2001
TOKYO -- Throughout the 1990s, the United States has responded to acts of terrorism using only very limited means. After Iraqi efforts to assassinate former President George H.W. Bush and after previous strikes by the Osama bin Laden organization, the United States responded by launching cruise missiles that fly slowly and cannot easily attack mobile targets. The primary purpose of these counterattacks was to show resolve and make a symbolic statement against terrorism while minimizing the risks of causing American military casualties and of provoking additional terrorist strikes.
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