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Liz F. Kay | September 28, 2011
If you've stuck some ground beef in your freezer after Aug. 23, listen up. Tyson Fresh Meats Inc. of Emporia, Kan. is recalling more than 113,000 pounds of ground beef due to a possible E. coli contamination in Ohio, according to the USDA. The meat was shipped to distribution centers in twelve states, including Maryland and Delaware, in three-pound chubs, were produced on Aug. 23 and bore a label stating a "BEST BEFORE OR FREEZE BY" date of "SEP 12 2011". The retail distribution list for this meat will be posted on the USDA's Food Safety and Inspection service website.
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FEATURES
For The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
At Myth and Moonshine, the 'shine isn't confined to Mason jars and shot glasses: It also makes it onto the food menu, which puts a sophisticated spin on country cooking. In this great cold-weather dish, butternut squash and pumpkin add sweetness and spice to hearty chili and a scoop of sour cream infused with sweet apple pie moonshine reduction adds a jolt of countrified fun. Pumpkin Chili with Moonshine Sour Cream Serves 8-10 For the chili: 1 medium butternut squash Olive oil 2 1/2 pounds ground beef 1 large onion, medium dice 1 medium carrot, medium dice 1 ¼ cups diced tomato 1 chipotle pepper in adobo sauce, minced 1 Tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 Tablespoon Worcestershire sauce 1 packed Tablespoon fresh sage, diced 1 Tablespoon dry oregano 1 1/2 Tablespoons white pepper 2 Tablespoons cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon fresh nutmeg, grated (optional)
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BUSINESS
By Liz Kay and Baltimore Sun reporter | August 30, 2010
If you shopped at BJ's earlier this summer, here's a reason to check your freezer. The USDA has announced a recall of 8,500 pounds of ground beef that was repackaged for sale at retail locations including 26 BJ's Wholesale Clubs, such as the location in the White Marsh Retail Center, due to possible E. Coli contamination. The original packages, each containing three 14-pound chubs, had a use or freeze by date of July 1, 2010. There have been three reports of illnesses --- two people in Maine and one in New York --- due to this meat, prepared by Cargill Meat Solutions Corp.
SPORTS
By John Thomas, For The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2013
There are a couple of ways to make a juicy fail-proof burger for a tailgate. The easiest and most consistent way to do it is to stuff the burger with cheese. A stuffed burger is juicy by nature because the inside is oozing gooey cheese rather than dense beef. This gives you more flexibility at the tailgate because you can keep the burgers warm on the grill longer without worrying about drying them out. The addition of bacon and jalapenos to the cheddar cheese center of this burger provides a unique texture along with a spicy kick that will change the way you view a typical burger.
FEATURES
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Evening Sun Staff | March 5, 1991
IS THERE a healthy hamburger in our future?Nutrition experts are skeptical, noting that foods high in saturated fats have been shown to contribute to heart disease and the risk of certain cancers. And a typical hamburger today is 20 to 30 percent fat.But Americans love their beef, and they're not likely to give it up, especially not ground beef. Indeed, 44 percent, or about 3 billion pounds, of the beef consumed in this country each year is ground beef, according to the Beef Industry Council.
FEATURES
November 13, 1991
* Use non-stick cookware or vegetable spray to cut down or eliminate cooking fat or oil.* Replace cream with evaporated skim milk. Replace whole milk with low-fat or skim milk.* Replace or blend sour cream with a reduced-fat sour cream or plain, low-fat or non-fat yogurt.* Replace some or all ground beef with ground turkey in meat loaf, chili and casseroles. Stick to ground beef for burgers.* Use sausages made from low-fat meats such as turkey, chicken and veal.* Use a small amount of broth or stock instead of fat to saute vegetables.
NEWS
August 28, 1997
Because of incorrect information provided to The Sun, the safe cooking temperatures for red meat and poultry were reversed in yesterday's Tidbits column in the A La Carte section. Ground beef should be cooked to 160 degrees, and whole poultry should be cooked to 180 degrees.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 8/28/97
NEWS
By JULIE ROTHMAN and JULIE ROTHMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 17, 2006
Linda Johnson of Hamilton Square, N.J., was looking for a recipe for a casserole she called Yankee Spaghetti. Matthew Fogner of Salisbury, N.C., sent in his recipe for a spaghetti casserole that bears the same name and sounds very close to what Johnson wanted. While his recipe doesn't have all the ingredients that Johnson remembers hers having, it does come pretty close. I tested this somewhat old-fashioned, stick-to-your-ribs recipe using lean ground beef, but ground turkey or chicken could easily be substituted.
FEATURES
September 11, 1991
* Use non-stick cookware or vegetable spray to cut down or eliminate cooking fat or oil.* Replace cream with evaporated skim milk. Replace whole milk with low-fat or skim milk.* Replace or blend sour cream with a reduced-fat sour cream or plain, low-fat or non-fat yogurt.* Replace some or all ground beef with ground turkey in meat loaf, chili and casseroles. Stick to ground beef for burgers.* Use sausages made from low-fat meats such as turkey, chicken and veal.* Use a small amount of broth or stock instead of fat to saute vegetables.
FEATURES
By Joanne E.Morvay | November 21, 2001
Item: Old El Paso Cheesy Taco Pizza Dinner Kit What you get: 8 mini-pizzas Cost: About $3 Nutritional content: 350 calories, 23 grams fat, 10 grams saturated fat, 660 milligrams sodium, 17 grams carbohydrate, 3 grams sugars Preparation time: About 25 to 30 minutes Review: When a friend suggested a last-minute dinner with the kids, I grabbed this kit and was ready to go. Between our two kitchens, we had the required ground beef as well as lettuce, tomato,...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2013
Cedar Cafe tries to be a lot of things at once: convenience store, carry-out, restaurant. Normally, when restaurants stretch themselves that thin, it's a turnoff. But Cedar Cafe does so well at the most important part - the food - that we feel OK overlooking its multiple personalities. The restaurant, tucked in an intersection of two residential streets in East Towson, has been open for years. However, in 2012, current owner Buthaina Mansour (or "Mama Buthaina" as she calls herself)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman
For The Baltimore Sun
| September 24, 2013
Kathy Blair from Somerset, Ky., was looking for a recipe she had clipped from a magazine years ago and has since lost for an unusual meatloaf. She said this meatloaf mixture was rolled out flat; mashed potatoes and chopped celery leaves were spread over the mixture and then it was rolled up jellyroll-style. It was then baked and when cooled slightly it could be sliced and the slices resembled pinwheels. I located a recipe on a food blog called DiaryofaCraftyCook.com that sounded very similar to what Blair had described.
FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard,
For The Baltimore Sun
| July 29, 2013
Chef and cooking instructor Nikki McGowan spices up traditional shepherd's pie with kid-friendly Mexican seasonings. The pie is simple enough for kids to help cook, too. During the busy school year, McGowan suggests prepping the pie (with the help of the kids) on Sunday, so it's ready to “pop into the oven on a crazy night of homework and after-school activities.” She recommends serving the pie with hot sauce and tortilla chips. “Kids can eat it by scooping it up with the chips,” she says.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2012
Bev Hannon from Marion, Iowa, was looking for a recipe for making meatballs similar to the ones her husband's mother, who was of Belgian descent, used to make. Her husband recalls that his mother made them with a combination of ground beef and pork and that she frequently served them with cooked cabbage. He was not sure, but he thought they might have been called something like "frikadel. " Leone Michel from Granger, Ind., thought that her recipe for making German meat patties or Frikadelle is likely what Hannon is in search of. She said her husband is German and that she has adapted this recipe from several that she has in German and Austrian cookbooks.
HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker | March 23, 2012
Wegmans Food Markets Inc. said today they will also stop selling meat with an additive known as pink slime. Thebyproduct comes from fatty scraps leftover after steaks and roasts are cut from a cow. The meat bits are heated to soften them and then spun to remove the fat and separate the meat. Ammonia is used to kill bacteria. The filler is sometimes mixed into fattier meat to create a leaner product. The USDA said pink slime passes food safety standards but many retailers have been pulling it from shelves because of concern from shoppers.
NEWS
Andrea K. Walker | March 22, 2012
Giant Food, the region's largest grocery chain, became the latest area supermarket Thursday to declare it would stop selling meat with the additive known as pink slime. The Landover-based company is among a growing number of supermarkets pulling the product from its shelves because of concern from shoppers, even though food regulators say pink slime, also known as "finely textured beef," passes food safety standards. "While the USDA … has indicated this product is safe for consumption and complies with all applicable standards for lean beef, many of our customers voiced concern regarding finely textured beef," Giant said in a statement.
HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker | March 23, 2012
Wegmans Food Markets Inc. said today they will also stop selling meat with an additive known as pink slime. Thebyproduct comes from fatty scraps leftover after steaks and roasts are cut from a cow. The meat bits are heated to soften them and then spun to remove the fat and separate the meat. Ammonia is used to kill bacteria. The filler is sometimes mixed into fattier meat to create a leaner product. The USDA said pink slime passes food safety standards but many retailers have been pulling it from shelves because of concern from shoppers.
NEWS
By Bill Daley and Bill Daley,Chicago Tribune | May 28, 2008
Consider this dish a Southwestern spin on a sloppy Joe. It's just as easy to make, especially if you buy commercially prepared salsa, refried beans and, of course, the soft flour tortillas. Use the Mexican variety of hot chorizo, which must be cooked. To crumble the sausage, cut down the casing with a sharp knife and use your fingers to pull out the meat. You can find chorizo at supermarkets and ethnic-food stores. Ground turkey or ground chicken are lower-fat alternatives to the ground beef.
BUSINESS
Liz F. Kay | September 28, 2011
If you've stuck some ground beef in your freezer after Aug. 23, listen up. Tyson Fresh Meats Inc. of Emporia, Kan. is recalling more than 113,000 pounds of ground beef due to a possible E. coli contamination in Ohio, according to the USDA. The meat was shipped to distribution centers in twelve states, including Maryland and Delaware, in three-pound chubs, were produced on Aug. 23 and bore a label stating a "BEST BEFORE OR FREEZE BY" date of "SEP 12 2011". The retail distribution list for this meat will be posted on the USDA's Food Safety and Inspection service website.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special To The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2011
If your only knowledge of Turkish food consists of the confection called "Turkish Delight," you're not alone. While Turkish food isn't well known, you could say the same about Cazbar, a narrow restaurant on Charles Street in Mount Vernon. It was so under the radar that it was recently reported to be closed. The tales of Cazbar's demise were greatly exaggerated, though, which is a good thing. Sitting down with a menu in Cazbar's cozy dining room, it's clear that any and all fears of otherworldly cuisine are unfounded.
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