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Groucho Marx

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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | August 19, 1997
He was a very funny man. Maybe the funniest.To an author: "From the moment I picked up your book until I laid it down I was convulsed with laughter. Some day I intend reading it."Groucho Marx, who died 20 years ago today, could tell a story. He could crack wise. He could deflate the most overblown of egos. He could take a pratfall. He could leer. He could raise his eyebrows (even if they were made of mostly grease pencil). He even walked funny, with a forward-leaning, loose-limbed lope that made him look like the Hunchback of Notre Dame trying to steal a base.
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By CHRIS KALTENBACH | February 19, 2006
THE DICK CAVETT SHOW: COMIC LEGENDS / / Shout! Factory / $39.95 Of all the Johnny Carson-wannabes trotted out by the networks, Dick Cavett was probably the best -- precisely because he didn't act like Carson. On The Tonight Show, it was often a toss-up who deserved the spotlight more, Carson or his guest. Rather than competing with his guests, Cavett instead chose simply to ask questions, serve as an audience surrogate -- and let the chips fall where they may. Cavett's shows may not have been as entertaining as Carson's were, but they were invaluable as showcases for his guests' talents.
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FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun TV Critic | November 4, 1991
"He needed a Groucho Marx to cheer him up. And he was the only person in the world who couldn't have one.""Here He Is . . . The One, The Only . . . Groucho," an HBO profile of Groucho Marx at 10 tonight, is full of that kind of smart talk about the late comedian. Dick Cavett, Jack Lemmon, Bill Cosby, George Fenneman, Miriam Marx and others offer thoughtful and, surprisingly, some tough-minded analysis and anecdotes in an hour worth cranking up the VCR for if you can't watch.Comedian David Steinberg narrates the show.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Terry Teachout and Terry Teachout,Special to the Sun | May 14, 2000
"Groucho: The Life and Times of Julius Henry Marx," by Stefan Kanfer. Alfred A. Knopf. 446 pages. $30. Who remembers Groucho Marx? Is there anybody left in America who can sing "Lydia, the Tattooed Lady" from memory? I can, but I'm on the far side of 40, which makes me a prime member of the target market for Stefan Kanfer's excellent new biography of the most verbally dextrous of the four Marx brothers. In the early '70s, when I was in high school, Groucho seemed utterly contemporary; indeed, he was something of a cult figure, in part because his anarchic comedy seemed well suited to the political tendencies of the day. You could see "Duck Soup" and "Horse Feathers" on pre-cable TV, as well as syndicated reruns of "You Bet Your Life," the game show that had put Groucho back in the spotlight in 1950 after a decade of fumbling.
NEWS
June 17, 1994
THOUGHT for the day, credited to Groucho Marx:"Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies."* * *AT recent commencement exercises for Montgomery County's Paint Branch High School, Attorney General Janet Reno gave advice not just for the Class of '94 but for everyone. She told the graduates that the day's events took her back 38 years to her own commencement on a June day in Miami, but she didn't have to go that far back to find some lasting words of wisdom:"The most important lesson I think I have learned began about nine or 10 years ago when a friend died, leaving me as the legal guardian of her 15 year-old twins.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Terry Teachout and Terry Teachout,Special to the Sun | May 14, 2000
"Groucho: The Life and Times of Julius Henry Marx," by Stefan Kanfer. Alfred A. Knopf. 446 pages. $30. Who remembers Groucho Marx? Is there anybody left in America who can sing "Lydia, the Tattooed Lady" from memory? I can, but I'm on the far side of 40, which makes me a prime member of the target market for Stefan Kanfer's excellent new biography of the most verbally dextrous of the four Marx brothers. In the early '70s, when I was in high school, Groucho seemed utterly contemporary; indeed, he was something of a cult figure, in part because his anarchic comedy seemed well suited to the political tendencies of the day. You could see "Duck Soup" and "Horse Feathers" on pre-cable TV, as well as syndicated reruns of "You Bet Your Life," the game show that had put Groucho back in the spotlight in 1950 after a decade of fumbling.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | January 13, 1995
The worlds of fine cuisine and fine music came together at Harborcourt Hotel Monday night where the Baltimore Chapter of La Chaine des Rotisseurs held its annual induction dinner. Among the 18 new members were two who made the evening's theme, "A Night at the Opera," come alive in song and food.Italian hors d'oeuvres and Domaine Chandon Blanc Noir Champagne began another gastronomic experience for the 125 black-tie guests. Harborcourt's executive chef and new Chaine member Holly Forbes and her staff prepared the food, while another new member, director of the Baltimore Opera Company Michael Harrison, provided props and opera singers, who sang arias from "Carmen," "Boris Godunov" and "Madama Butterfly," to correspond with the serving of courses of smoked salmon, stuffed pheasant breast, and confit of duck.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | September 26, 1990
DALLAS -- The man from "Firing Line" asked me who I wanted to have on the show with me. I was going on "Firing Line" to discuss my new book. (Have I mentioned that I have written a new book? I mean, have I mentioned it this week?)"There will be you and Bill Buckley, of course," the guy from the show said, "and we were thinking of adding a third person. Does anybody come to mind?"Many names immediately came to mind. There are many excellent authors with books just coming out who would kill for a chance to be on a national show like "Firing Line."
NEWS
By BENNARD B. PERLMAN | December 1, 1993
The recent death of Baltimore radio and TV personality Garry Moore caused me to recall our initial meeting. It was 1947 and, having completed my sophomore year in college, I was traveling the country during summer vacation. Eating lunch in the NBC commissary in Hollywood, I glanced out the window and observed a strange message on the marquee: ''Garry Moore in 'Take It Or Leave It' Tonight.''Now everyone knew that the emcee of that top-rated radio show was Phil Baker, so I sauntered over to the box office where free tickets were dispensed to inform someone of the error.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | February 19, 2006
THE DICK CAVETT SHOW: COMIC LEGENDS / / Shout! Factory / $39.95 Of all the Johnny Carson-wannabes trotted out by the networks, Dick Cavett was probably the best -- precisely because he didn't act like Carson. On The Tonight Show, it was often a toss-up who deserved the spotlight more, Carson or his guest. Rather than competing with his guests, Cavett instead chose simply to ask questions, serve as an audience surrogate -- and let the chips fall where they may. Cavett's shows may not have been as entertaining as Carson's were, but they were invaluable as showcases for his guests' talents.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | October 25, 1998
It was a guess, nothing more. But history professor Jon Wiener, a specialist on the Cold War, thought he'd give it a shot. A long-time Marx Brothers fan, Wiener figured he'd check to see if the FBI had kept a file on Groucho Marx.Imagine, Groucho under government scrutiny as a possible subversive. Could happen. After all, Groucho did wisecrack his way through life, sneering at things sacred. It was Groucho who said: "These are my principles. If you don't like them I have others."Perhaps such a fellow would arouse J. Edgar Hoover's suspicion.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | August 19, 1997
He was a very funny man. Maybe the funniest.To an author: "From the moment I picked up your book until I laid it down I was convulsed with laughter. Some day I intend reading it."Groucho Marx, who died 20 years ago today, could tell a story. He could crack wise. He could deflate the most overblown of egos. He could take a pratfall. He could leer. He could raise his eyebrows (even if they were made of mostly grease pencil). He even walked funny, with a forward-leaning, loose-limbed lope that made him look like the Hunchback of Notre Dame trying to steal a base.
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly | October 13, 1996
Homework is the nastiest word in the English language.When an October afternoon turns chilly and blue, I'm reminded of this ritual. Columns of pent-up children jump off buses after a day's imprisonment at their desks. They are no more in a mood to sit down and hit the books than I was all those years ago. I still sympathize with these budding scholars whose canvas backpacks bulge with binders, papers and that dose of evening responsibility.I guess it has to be this way.A wise teacher once explained it all to me: "Children need homework.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | January 18, 1995
Is there any doubt that, in deference to Jack Kent Cooke, the National Football League wants to keep a football team out of Baltimore? So, in deference to Baltimore, let's keep Jack Kenmands therapy, and this is the best I can think of. Let's turn the lawyers loose to keep Old Jack from building his obnoxious stadium. (The Redskins are appealing an initial denial of their proposal to the Anne Arundel County Board of Appeals, so now's the time to make your feelings known.) Let's play the way the NFL does, too -- dirty.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | January 13, 1995
The worlds of fine cuisine and fine music came together at Harborcourt Hotel Monday night where the Baltimore Chapter of La Chaine des Rotisseurs held its annual induction dinner. Among the 18 new members were two who made the evening's theme, "A Night at the Opera," come alive in song and food.Italian hors d'oeuvres and Domaine Chandon Blanc Noir Champagne began another gastronomic experience for the 125 black-tie guests. Harborcourt's executive chef and new Chaine member Holly Forbes and her staff prepared the food, while another new member, director of the Baltimore Opera Company Michael Harrison, provided props and opera singers, who sang arias from "Carmen," "Boris Godunov" and "Madama Butterfly," to correspond with the serving of courses of smoked salmon, stuffed pheasant breast, and confit of duck.
NEWS
June 17, 1994
THOUGHT for the day, credited to Groucho Marx:"Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies."* * *AT recent commencement exercises for Montgomery County's Paint Branch High School, Attorney General Janet Reno gave advice not just for the Class of '94 but for everyone. She told the graduates that the day's events took her back 38 years to her own commencement on a June day in Miami, but she didn't have to go that far back to find some lasting words of wisdom:"The most important lesson I think I have learned began about nine or 10 years ago when a friend died, leaving me as the legal guardian of her 15 year-old twins.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | September 25, 1992
In an election year in which the candidates' wives often seem to take precedence over the candidates, what could be more fitting than a revival of the 1931 Gershwin, Gershwin, Kaufman and Ryskind musical, "Of Thee I Sing"?After all, this is a show in which the presidential election hinges on candidate John P. Wintergreen's selection of a spouse who's not only a career woman, but also bakes the best darned corn muffins in the land. Wintergreen bases his campaign on a seemingly incontestable platform of "love," and victory seems assured -- until the Other Woman shows up.And, just in case these plot points don't seem sufficiently timely, consider the fact that Wintergreen's vice president is a bumbling nebbish who can't spell -- even his own name.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | January 18, 1995
Is there any doubt that, in deference to Jack Kent Cooke, the National Football League wants to keep a football team out of Baltimore? So, in deference to Baltimore, let's keep Jack Kenmands therapy, and this is the best I can think of. Let's turn the lawyers loose to keep Old Jack from building his obnoxious stadium. (The Redskins are appealing an initial denial of their proposal to the Anne Arundel County Board of Appeals, so now's the time to make your feelings known.) Let's play the way the NFL does, too -- dirty.
NEWS
By BENNARD B. PERLMAN | December 1, 1993
The recent death of Baltimore radio and TV personality Garry Moore caused me to recall our initial meeting. It was 1947 and, having completed my sophomore year in college, I was traveling the country during summer vacation. Eating lunch in the NBC commissary in Hollywood, I glanced out the window and observed a strange message on the marquee: ''Garry Moore in 'Take It Or Leave It' Tonight.''Now everyone knew that the emcee of that top-rated radio show was Phil Baker, so I sauntered over to the box office where free tickets were dispensed to inform someone of the error.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | September 25, 1992
In an election year in which the candidates' wives often seem to take precedence over the candidates, what could be more fitting than a revival of the 1931 Gershwin, Gershwin, Kaufman and Ryskind musical, "Of Thee I Sing"?After all, this is a show in which the presidential election hinges on candidate John P. Wintergreen's selection of a spouse who's not only a career woman, but also bakes the best darned corn muffins in the land. Wintergreen bases his campaign on a seemingly incontestable platform of "love," and victory seems assured -- until the Other Woman shows up.And, just in case these plot points don't seem sufficiently timely, consider the fact that Wintergreen's vice president is a bumbling nebbish who can't spell -- even his own name.
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