Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGrotesque
IN THE NEWS

Grotesque

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,London Bureau of The Sun | March 7, 1994
OXFORD, England -- Gargoyles and grotesques glare, grimace and grin from the hallowed buildings of this old university town like a horde of uneasy spirits trapped forever in stone.Hundreds, even thousands, of these twisted faces and writhing figures punctuate the collegiate facades like footnotes to a long architectural thesis. They line the walls of Balliol and All Souls and Brasenose and Christ Church and Magdalen and New College -- weathering galleries of wild things and weird beasties.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By PHOTOS BY JED KIRSCHBAUM and PHOTOS BY JED KIRSCHBAUM,SUN PHOTOGRAPHER | October 31, 2005
Trick-or-treaters will don whimsical and scary costumes this evening before stalking Baltimore's streets for chocolate and sugary snacks. But observing these activities from their permanent posts will be mythological creatures and seemingly sentient animals. Architects and builders have employed gargoyles and grotesques on numerous buildings across Baltimore. Gargoyles, which date to at least the early 13th century, often act as waterspouts but are appreciated as decoration - if you can actually get close enough to see them well.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Mary T. McCarthy and Mary T. McCarthy,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 26, 1997
It's a jungle out there.Downtown Baltimore buildings are home to a variety of architectural creatures that peer down at passers-by, seemingly protecting the structures where they reside.Nowadays pedestrians seem to pay little attention to the devilish creatures scattered throughout the city, but with Halloween approaching, some can't help but look up at the gargoyles.Gargoyles are often-misunderstood creatures. Many people think of gargoyles as a hunched-over creepy beasts with wings.While they are often carved in this grotesque fashion, gargoyles are often functional architectural details that serve as waterspouts, projecting from the roof gutter of a building and sometimes spewing water through their mouths.
FEATURES
October 8, 2005
GO See Wallace and Gromit: The Curse of The Were-Rabbit: It's the bubbliest comic chemistry out there - even if it IS between two figures made of plasticine, a fubsy inventor named Wallace and his mild-mannered mighty dog, Gromit. A+ Thumbsucker: Lou Pucci stars as a high school loner who finds strength and self-confidence through a mix of prescription drugs and star status on his speech and debate team, only to discover that people liked him better the other way. Tilda Swinton and Vincent D'Onofrio are his befuddled parents.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 29, 2005
I doubt if the texture of Southern life is any more grotesque than that of the rest of the nation," wrote Flannery O'Connor, "but it does seem evident that the Southern writer is particularly adept at recognizing the grotesque; and to recognize the grotesque, you have to have some notion of what is not grotesque and why." Ray McKinnon has that notion, and it's his signal strength as a Southern writer-director. Chrystal, set in the Arkansas Ozarks, tells the often violent and lowdown story of a guy named Joe (Billy Bob Thornton)
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | January 11, 1993
If you are not utterly sick of politics, "Feed," which opens today at the Charles, is an amusing if overlong (even at 75 minutes!) look at the grotesque festival of backslapping and grandstanding by which we elect our presidents.It's an examination of the New Hampshire primary way back in February of last year, but it's far from the usual Theodore White election-as-race model that dominates journalistic convention; instead, it's a tapestry of amusing, grotesque, edgy intimacies that is less interested in policy differences between candidates than the grubby sameness of trying to get unimpressed and media-jaded working-class New Hampshirites to pull levers or at least shake hands (a terrible woman refuses to shake Bob Kerry's)
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | March 6, 1993
Just what we needed most of all: an Eskimo "King Lear."That's "Shadow of the Wolf," a large, quite absurd picture hailing from the land north of Buffalo, N.Y. that has invaded local theaters.The $31-million Canadian production, reportedly the most expensive movie made in that country, is at once spectacularly exotic and spectacularly mundane. Conceived, evidently, as some sort of tribute to the hearty Inuit people of the frozen north who eke out a surprisingly comfortable existence from a terrain so hostile it could be Martian, the movie nevertheless founders at the level of respect for the very souls it seeks to honor.
NEWS
December 8, 2001
Work life was tough, but historic Canton was never `grotesque' As the daughter of parents who grew up in Canton during the era of the canning houses, I was interested in the article on neighborhood history ("From ketchup to condos, residents remember Canton," Nov. 29). As a child I heard stories of the shops, packing houses and open-air markets. What I did not hear at any time was the description of Canton as "grotesque." Perhaps Elaine Eff of the Maryland Historical Trust meant to describe the working conditions of the canning houses.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | October 23, 1995
THE DOUBLE STANDARD is alive and well among America's opinion elites. Imagine that David Duke had organized a white man's march on Washington. Would the powers-that-be have declared that while David Duke himself was objectionable, the message of the rally was ''lofty,'' to use President Clinton's phrase?No way. Every person who showed up in response to Mr. Duke's call would have been tainted as a racist or a tolerator of racists.But most whites in America still patronize blacks by declining to apply to them the standards they apply to themselves.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | September 21, 2001
I GET A small dose of relief in the news that Baltimore will not become home to a 17,000-square-foot restaurant that features the image of a plane crashing into it. In light of the horrific terrorist attacks, local developer Pat Turner has scrapped his plans for Crash Cafe, a disaster-themed restaurant he had hoped to open here and, eventually, in other cities. "I pulled the plug on it last Tuesday," Turner told me yesterday, referring to the day terrorists hijacked jetliners and crashed them into the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, killing thousands.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 29, 2005
I doubt if the texture of Southern life is any more grotesque than that of the rest of the nation," wrote Flannery O'Connor, "but it does seem evident that the Southern writer is particularly adept at recognizing the grotesque; and to recognize the grotesque, you have to have some notion of what is not grotesque and why." Ray McKinnon has that notion, and it's his signal strength as a Southern writer-director. Chrystal, set in the Arkansas Ozarks, tells the often violent and lowdown story of a guy named Joe (Billy Bob Thornton)
TRAVEL
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Special to the Sun | July 25, 2004
The world is full of places I would like to see; some I would like to see again. A few I would like to see again and again and again. Guanajuato is one of these. That's why during a recent three-month stay in Mexico, my wife, Susana, and I were so often there. No destination is more compelling for us in that country, except perhaps the Mayan cities of the Yucatan. But those are museums, really, places where history stopped dead in time. Guanajuato (pronounced gwan-ah-WHA-toh), about 150 miles northwest of Mexico City in the cactus-choked foothills of the Sierra Madre, is a living city that evolved within its challenging topography unlike any other in the New World.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Heller McAlpin and Heller McAlpin,Chicago Tribune | May 9, 2004
Just when you think you've had it with coming-of-age stories about dysfunctional families, along comes Stacy Sims with a fresh, edgy angle. Her brutally moving first novel, Swimming Naked (Penguin, 243 pages, $24.95), which is due out this month, is told from the perspective of 30-year-old Lucy Greene, a chain-smoking photography curator from Ohio who depicts her family as if they were grotesques in a Diane Arbus photograph. Lucy is in Florida to attend her 58-year-old mother, who is dying of metastasized lung cancer.
NEWS
December 8, 2001
Work life was tough, but historic Canton was never `grotesque' As the daughter of parents who grew up in Canton during the era of the canning houses, I was interested in the article on neighborhood history ("From ketchup to condos, residents remember Canton," Nov. 29). As a child I heard stories of the shops, packing houses and open-air markets. What I did not hear at any time was the description of Canton as "grotesque." Perhaps Elaine Eff of the Maryland Historical Trust meant to describe the working conditions of the canning houses.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | September 21, 2001
I GET A small dose of relief in the news that Baltimore will not become home to a 17,000-square-foot restaurant that features the image of a plane crashing into it. In light of the horrific terrorist attacks, local developer Pat Turner has scrapped his plans for Crash Cafe, a disaster-themed restaurant he had hoped to open here and, eventually, in other cities. "I pulled the plug on it last Tuesday," Turner told me yesterday, referring to the day terrorists hijacked jetliners and crashed them into the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, killing thousands.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | October 24, 1999
The bad guys in "Les Vampires," French director Louis Feuillade's 1915 movie serial, don't suck blood, they steal jewels. And Bela Lugosi is nowhere in sight (although one of the actors looks suspiciously like him). But this 10-part, eight-hour silent journey through the streets and along the rooftops of Paris, as a nasty band of thieves (led by the sinister Irma Vep, played by Musidora of the Folies Bergere) prey on the rich and powerful, is more than eerie enough to warrant tonight's Halloween-season airing on TCM, beginning at 8 p.m.Grotesqueries abound (at one point, a box is opened to reveal ... a severed head!
FEATURES
October 8, 2005
GO See Wallace and Gromit: The Curse of The Were-Rabbit: It's the bubbliest comic chemistry out there - even if it IS between two figures made of plasticine, a fubsy inventor named Wallace and his mild-mannered mighty dog, Gromit. A+ Thumbsucker: Lou Pucci stars as a high school loner who finds strength and self-confidence through a mix of prescription drugs and star status on his speech and debate team, only to discover that people liked him better the other way. Tilda Swinton and Vincent D'Onofrio are his befuddled parents.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | February 27, 1995
There is startling new evidence that many of the computer enthusiasts who surf the information highway are really very sick people.I'm not talking about the sexual cybercreeps who go on-line to electronically lust after women or other objects of their warped desires. That practice has already been thoroughly documented by those who study low life forms.And I'm not referring to all the over-age bed-wetters who use their high IQs to steal credit cards or vandalize someone else's precious blips.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | October 16, 1999
Step right up, ladies and gentlemen, boys and girls! Behind these rowhouse doors on Maryland Avenue are sights you will never see again, grotesqueries that will make you recoil in horror and tremble like a frightened kitten.Inside this place you will be mesmerized by the skeleton of the Peruvian Amazon, a giant who stood 10 feet tall. You will be repelled by the Samoan Sea Worm, a fierce creature that in life could gut a cat in seconds. You will be astounded by a five-legged dog and awed by the petrified right hand of Spider Lillie, a 19th-century prostitute who killed her clients by hiding poisonous spiders in their clothing.
BUSINESS
By Mary T. McCarthy and Mary T. McCarthy,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 26, 1997
It's a jungle out there.Downtown Baltimore buildings are home to a variety of architectural creatures that peer down at passers-by, seemingly protecting the structures where they reside.Nowadays pedestrians seem to pay little attention to the devilish creatures scattered throughout the city, but with Halloween approaching, some can't help but look up at the gargoyles.Gargoyles are often-misunderstood creatures. Many people think of gargoyles as a hunched-over creepy beasts with wings.While they are often carved in this grotesque fashion, gargoyles are often functional architectural details that serve as waterspouts, projecting from the roof gutter of a building and sometimes spewing water through their mouths.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.