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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2012
One Baltimore politician has declared war on dirty grocery stores, dirty restaurants, dirty hotels -- all dirt, really. Call it a one-woman (for now) crusade for cleanliness. Del. Jill P. Carter is calling it her consumer revolt. "How is it that a 'fresh market' has a filthy floor? Or 'whole foods' has an unkempt buffet? Or those rarely washed credit card machines?" Carter said on Twitter Wednesday. "The general public, paying consumers, must demand higher standards of cleanliness & quality..stop spending Ritz-C $ on Motel6 accommodations.
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NEWS
August 2, 2014
There is an area of West Baltimore that has been devoid of a grocery store for 15 years. Yes,15 years ( "City says largest supermarket to open in Howard Park after years of lobbying," July 28). The term for an area or community bereft of a food store is "food desert. " Food (and water) are inherently vital to our survival as human beings. Baltimore perceives itself as a major American city yet pockets of it have been without major food stores for 15 years? Shouldn't the politicians be ultimately accountable?
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NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | July 17, 2013
Nineteen months after celebrating the opening of the Family Market in the Long Reach Village Center, the community again finds itself without a grocery store. The Family Market, which combined internationally themed items and basic necessities, has been evicted from the village center by its landlord, Safeway, according to Safeway spokesman Craig Muckle. According to Muckle, Safeway, which vacated the space in 2011, had been subletting to the Family Market since December 2012.
NEWS
August 2, 2014
Your story about the closure of the last Stop Shop Save grocery stores in Baltimore is yet another sad example of why the city should move to repeal the bottle tax ( "Stop Shop Save to close remaining Baltimore locations," July 22). The bottle tax is hurting independent grocery stores like Stop Shop Save. This legislation, which exists nowhere else in the country, has made it nearly impossible for city-based grocers to compete with stores across the county line that don't have to pay the tax. The beverage container tax was increased on July 1, 2013, by 3 cents for every bottle and can of water, iced tea, soft drinks and juices.
NEWS
February 17, 2014
Shopper loses her purse and finds honesty in grocery store Today I lost my purse at Save A Lot Foods in Arbutus. I didn't realize it for almost three hours and was in a panic mode when I did. I went back to the store and asked the cashier if anyone had turned in my purse and they had. The manager had locked it in the safe. I want to take this time to thank the person, who found my purse. The manager said no name was left but I want to let him/her know how much I appreciate it. This action confirms my faith that there are still many good people around.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2013
The developer of a vacant lot in Charles Village owned by the Johns Hopkins University has decided not to build a grocery store there. The university supports the decision about the site, at the corner of St. Paul and E. 33rd streets, said a statement released Wednesday by Armada Hoffler, the lead developer of the 1.1-acre site. The other firms involved are Beatty Development Group LLC and Skye Hospitality LLC. The development group, 3200StPaul, has met with residents of Charles Village and the surrounding communities in recent weeks to solicit their thoughts on how the land should be used.
NEWS
September 11, 2011
I read with interest and amazement the article on children nagging their parents for junk food in the supermarket ("Combating the 'nag factor,' Sept. 8). The entire situation is a foreign concept to me. Professor Dina Borzekowski observed that "every mom has a story about the tantrum in the cereal aisle. " I don't, and I certainly don't have children who are overly angelic. Far from it. I have a 3-year-old and 6-year-old who are pretty typical kids with the exception of one thing - they watch very little TV. Maybe one hour a week, sometimes less.
NEWS
March 3, 1991
Services for Benjamin Gumnit, who operated a grocery store in East Baltimore for 35 years, will be held at noon today at Sol Levinson & Bros. funeral home, 6010 Reisterstown Road.Mr. Gumnit, 85, died Friday at Baltimore County General Hospital.He had Alzheimer's disease and had lived for the past 1 1/2 years at the Milford Manor Nursing Home.Born in eastern Europe near the border of Russia and Poland, Mr. Gumnit was 5 years old when he came to the United States with his mother and four sisters.
NEWS
November 11, 2004
Anne A. Rabinowitz, longtime owner of a Northwest Baltimore grocery store who later sold women's apparel, died of heart failure Sunday at a Cleveland hospice. The former Pikesville resident was 88. She was born Anne Attman in Russia, the youngest of 10 children. She immigrated to Baltimore in 1921 after being sponsored by brother Harry Attman, founder of the well-known East Lombard Street delicatessen. Raised on East Lombard Street, Mrs. Rabinowitz was a 1934 graduate of Eastern High School.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1998
A 55,000-square-foot Safeway opens today in the newly renovated Harper's Choice Village Center, which has gone more than two years without a grocery store.The store, which is the company's largest in Howard County, includes a pharmacy, full-service deli, bakery, seafood counter and flower shop.It opens amid concerns among merchants and others for safety at the center after a weekend incident in which two Safeway employees were robbed at gunpoint outside the store.About 11: 30 p.m. Saturday, Howard County police said, the workers were walking toward the store on Harper's Farm Road when they were accosted and robbed of their cash, police said.
BUSINESS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
Residents of one of Baltimore's many "food deserts" will gain more access to fresh meats and produce when what officials say is the city's largest grocery store opens Thursday in Howard Park. The 67,000-square-foot ShopRite store reflects a push to bring healthier food options to neighborhoods that have long been without a full-service food market. "When you have an environment that is lacking in fresh food options, it will be harder for you to be healthy," Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said.
BUSINESS
By Michael Bodley and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2014
An inner-city Baltimore grocery chain is closing its stores, delivering a blow to Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's efforts to eliminate the city's "food deserts" and provide more residents with healthy eating options. An official of Stop Shop Save, a minority-owned business that has been a Baltimore mainstay since 1978, confirmed Tuesday that it had already closed five stores and will close the last one — on Harford Avenue in Oliver — leaving neighborhoods across the city without a convenient grocery store.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
A man was critically wounded in a Northwest Baltimore grocery parking lot shooting on Thursday and police said they have a person of interest in custody. Baltimore police said a man was shot before 11 a.m. in the 3600 block of W. Cold Spring Lane in a bronze Ford sedan parked in an Aldi grocery store parking lot. As police arrived and began interviewing witnesses, they found a man they described as a "person of interest" in the shooting and took him into custody, Baltimore police spokesman Det. Sgt. Jarron Jackson said.
NEWS
February 17, 2014
Shopper loses her purse and finds honesty in grocery store Today I lost my purse at Save A Lot Foods in Arbutus. I didn't realize it for almost three hours and was in a panic mode when I did. I went back to the store and asked the cashier if anyone had turned in my purse and they had. The manager had locked it in the safe. I want to take this time to thank the person, who found my purse. The manager said no name was left but I want to let him/her know how much I appreciate it. This action confirms my faith that there are still many good people around.
NEWS
Aegis staff report | January 17, 2014
An Ace Hardware Express will open in early February inside the existing Harvest Fare grocery store in Fallston, at the intersection of Routes 1 and 152. This will be the first store of its kind in the state, but the precedent has already been set in other states such as Texas, where combination hardware and grocery store operations have been successful, according to press release from Harvest Fare. The location of the hardware store is expected to allow customers to avoid heavy Bel Air traffic.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2013
While some parts of western Anne Arundel County, including Hanover and Crofton, have boomed with retail development, Odenton has largely been passed by. But a new report commissioned by county economic development officials suggests Odenton has desirable demographics — educated, affluent homeowners who could support two more grocery stores and more restaurants. "There is strong demand for certain kinds of retail in Odenton," said Mary Burkholder, executive vice president of the Anne Arundel County Economic Development Corp., which commissioned the $15,000 study of Odenton's retail environment.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | April 12, 1998
Anthony Robinson, a West Baltimore deli and grocery store owner whose business survived the riots of 1968 and several arsons, died Tuesday of heart failure while living with friends in Havre de Grace. He was 76.From the mid-1950s until the late 1970s, Mr. Robinson operated the A.O.K. Grocery Store on Bentalou Street.The store was small and could accommodate only about five people at a time, but was known for thick sandwiches, all varieties of sodas, scores of faithful customers and a bench outside where people gathered until well into the evening.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2012
James F. Bray, a retired grocery store manager, died Tuesday of an aneurysm at his Jessup home. He was 76. Mr. Bray was born in Virginia and raised in North Carolina and Baltimore, where he graduated from city public schools. He served in the Army for three months and was honorably discharged in 1958. Mr. Bray worked for Food Fair and later as an evening grocery manager at Pantry Pride from 1952 to 1981, when he retired. During the 1980s, he worked for several years for Valu Food as a manager.
NEWS
November 23, 2013
Baltimore Sun contributor Sloane Brown was picking up lunch at Whole Foods last week when she found herself singing along to a Beach Boys song that was playing in the store. "So hoist up the John B's sail, see how the mainsail sets," sang Brown as she bent over the salad bar. "Let me go home, let me go home. I wanna go home. " Then she realized she wasn't the only one singing along to the Beach Boys' 1966 hit. A person on the other side of the salad bar was singing, too, and he looked very familiar.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | November 19, 2013
Seawall Development Corp.'s proposed conversion of a three-block stretch of Remington Avenue into a $43 million project called Remington Row is taking shape, with new plans to bring in a boutique grocery store and to buy the current site of a 7-Eleven convenience store at 211 W. 28th St. Seawall partner Evan Morville made the announcements at a meeting Saturday, Nov. 16, to update area residents on the string of projects that are planned in the...
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