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By Jane Meredith Adams and Jane Meredith Adams,Contributing Writer | July 26, 1994
SAN RAFAEL, Calif. -- Grocery bags with a 9-year-old Salvadoran boy's story of how he illegally reached California are headed for a shredder this week, after enraged residents succeeded in getting the bags withdrawn.The incident is the latest evidence of the growing disdain for illegal immigrants in California. Gov. Pete Wilson has blamed the undocumented aliens for the state's laggard economy, saying that the immigrants drain the budget by clogging welfare rolls and medical clinics.Tensions have been particularly high here in Marin County, a wealthy San Francisco suburb that in recent years has become a refuge for thousands of immigrants, including many who work as gardeners and construction laborers.
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NEWS
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | November 24, 2011
On Thursday morning, volunteers at the annual Bea Gaddy Thanksgiving luncheon worked themselves into a frenzy. Standing beside each other in a long line that snaked across a couple of halls, they passed down bags of food to one another at a breakneck pace, assembly-line fashion. "It's very hectic," said one of the volunteers, Michelle Hoover of Edgemere. The volunteers worked fast to keep up with the thousands of needy people — as many as 50,000 last year, according to organizers — who come to this luncheon every Thanksgiving.
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NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | May 6, 1996
In the latest effort to quash the mayor's proposed income tax increase, two Baltimore City Council members will offer two more options for consideration: a tax on grocery bags and a bill to distribute more state lottery revenue back to the city.Councilman Nicholas C. D'Adamo of the 1st District will present a lottery bill, and 4th District Councilwoman Sheila Dixon will introduce a grocery bag tax proposal at today's council meeting. The proposals will join other options, including a bottle tax, that council members have proposed.
NEWS
February 9, 2011
While Maryland state lawmakers consider instituting a five-cent fee on plastic bags, you should consider this: Those polypropylene bags that will replace them are likely to bring dangerous bacteria like E. coli in contact with your food. ( "The (occasional) virtues of nickel-and-diming," Feb. 8). According to a recent survey from Opinion Research Corporation, more than half of the people who do their grocery shopping with reusable bags have never washed them. This is despite the fact that a recent study from the University of Arizona found that more than half of the bags they tested came up positive for coliform, while 11 percent tested positive for E. coli.
NEWS
By Lourdes Sullivan and Lourdes Sullivan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 13, 1996
THE PERENNIALLY popular Kids Bazaar will open for one day, at 9 a.m. Sept. 21, at the Forest Ridge School Recreation Center.This bazaar -- featuring treasures now outgrown, unsuitable or overlooked -- offers hundreds of children's items for sale. Come to buy or sell items for infants, games, sports equipment, toys and other childhood necessities.This flea market/yard sale is sponsored by the Howard County Department of Recreation and Parks.An exhibitor's fee of $10 buys a 9-by-15-foot space.
FEATURES
By Dolly Merritt | July 9, 1994
Around the house* If clothes were left in dryer too long, remove wrinkles by turning on tumble-dry cycle; when cycle is over, remove clothes immediately.* Spray toss pillows and cushions that are used outdoors but are not weather resistant with a soil repellent. The treated fabric will be more resistant to soil and spilled drinks.* Rearrange inside of refrigerator. Avoid stacking food and crowding small spaces. Do not overload shelves with warm foods. Air must be able to circulate.* Save leftover pickle juice and add sliced cucumbers, carrots and other vegetables to marinate them.
NEWS
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | November 24, 2011
On Thursday morning, volunteers at the annual Bea Gaddy Thanksgiving luncheon worked themselves into a frenzy. Standing beside each other in a long line that snaked across a couple of halls, they passed down bags of food to one another at a breakneck pace, assembly-line fashion. "It's very hectic," said one of the volunteers, Michelle Hoover of Edgemere. The volunteers worked fast to keep up with the thousands of needy people — as many as 50,000 last year, according to organizers — who come to this luncheon every Thanksgiving.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | December 30, 1991
MY NEW YEAR'S resolution is to develop a more positive attitude -- although knowing what a loser I am, it probably won't work.That's the whole problem with these stupid resolutions, anyway. No one ever sticks to them, so why even bother? Why lie to yourself and say: This year will be different?Actually, my original New Year's resolution was to lose 15 pounds.But then I thought: Yeah, right. Like you're going to stop wolfing down a dozen Oreos at a clip, or buying those Italian submarine sandwiches the size of shoe boxes.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | January 4, 2000
The Howard County Council approved last night a slight increase in taxicab fares and a transfer of funds to help buy 25 acres of land in Ellicott City for a new government office complex. The votes on both measures were unanimous, though western county Republican Allan H. Kittleman warned that he supported only the purchase of land, and is reserving judgment on what should be built on the acreage a half-mile from the county office complex. "It's important that we purchase this land," Kittleman said.
FEATURES
By Ron Gasbarro | September 22, 1990
A new kind of outlaw exists in America today. That person is not a killer, as such. Not a thief, exactly. Yet that person is slowly but steadily killing our environment, robbing us of vital resources that cannot be replaced.That person is the American homeowner. You know the type. The one who throws aluminum soda cans in the trash. Dumps house paint down the drain that ends up in the Chesapeake Bay. Saturates the lawn with chemicals. Flushes the toilet once, twice, three times a visit. Hasn't a clue as to how Styrofoam is made.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler | July 10, 2009
I need some help to break the disposable bag habit. I know those ubiquitous plastic grocery bags are a major source of litter on land and sea and that such debris can poison fish and choke wildlife. I've cringed at bags stuck in trees along the highway and twisted in tall grasses that line tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay. Yet, a reusable cloth bag languishes in the back seat of my car, forgotten until it mocks me when I return from shopping carrying more of the wretched plastic things.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | July 16, 2008
Baltimore moved a step closer to becoming one of the first cities in the nation to ban plastic bags at grocery stores and retail chains after the proposal skidded through a critical City Council committee vote yesterday. Intended to keep the hard-to-degrade sacks from winding up in waterways or caught on tree branches, the proposal would require large stores to bag groceries in paper or reusable bags only. San Francisco became the first city in the country to enact a partial ban on certain types of plastic bags last year.
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,Special to The Sun | November 11, 2007
Students at St. Andrew's United Methodist Day School in Edgewater are taking on a new environmental issue in their quest to receive a "Green School" designation from the Maryland Department of Education. This year, they began to sell reusable grocery bags to discourage shoppers from using plastic ones. Environmentalists say plastic bags cause more pollution when they wind up in landfills and are washed into the Chesapeake Bay. Next week, the Annapolis city council is expected to decide whether to ban retailers from using plastic bags.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,sun reporter | November 19, 2006
While one Baltimore began shopping and planning for a Thanksgiving feast yesterday, another lined up around the block in a poor and careworn section of West Baltimore to accept free food and the generosity of strangers. More than 2,000 people -- from great-grandmothers to toddlers -- waited quietly, for hours, in a cold line that stretched around the block in the historic Upton neighborhood off Pennsylvania Avenue. For two hours, they funneled down a corridor of crowd barriers to collect food provided by Autumn Harvest 2006, a relief campaign organized by Virginia-based Operation Blessing International and held at different inner-city sites each year.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | January 2, 2004
Baltimore residents will be able to keep track of their pickup schedule for recyclables as well as holidays and major city events, such as the Flower Mart and Artscape, thanks to a 2004 calendar produced by the Department of Public Works. The calendar, which is being mailed to 177,000 city households this week and next, contains the schedules for the citywide collection of bottles, cans and jars and the neighborhood pickups of paper goods along with tips and information on bulk trash pickups, rodent control and other public works programs.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | January 4, 2000
The Howard County Council approved last night a slight increase in taxicab fares and a transfer of funds to help buy 25 acres of land in Ellicott City for a new government office complex. The votes on both measures were unanimous, though western county Republican Allan H. Kittleman warned that he supported only the purchase of land, and is reserving judgment on what should be built on the acreage a half-mile from the county office complex. "It's important that we purchase this land," Kittleman said.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | January 2, 2004
Baltimore residents will be able to keep track of their pickup schedule for recyclables as well as holidays and major city events, such as the Flower Mart and Artscape, thanks to a 2004 calendar produced by the Department of Public Works. The calendar, which is being mailed to 177,000 city households this week and next, contains the schedules for the citywide collection of bottles, cans and jars and the neighborhood pickups of paper goods along with tips and information on bulk trash pickups, rodent control and other public works programs.
FEATURES
By John Javna and John Javna,The EarthWorks Group | November 17, 1990
Last week I started sorting through the facts about trash bags to find out which is better -- plastic or paper.My conclusion is: neither. It's better to precycle and recycle. However, that's not going to eliminate all our garbage. So we're back to the original question.I find it a little perplexing: On one hand, paper comes from renewable resources and is biodegradable; on the other hand, nothing readily decomposes in a landfill, so it doesn't matter. And because landfills are designed to keep things out of the environment, even if paper bags did degrade there, it wouldn't do us a lot of good.
NEWS
By Lourdes Sullivan and Lourdes Sullivan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 13, 1996
THE PERENNIALLY popular Kids Bazaar will open for one day, at 9 a.m. Sept. 21, at the Forest Ridge School Recreation Center.This bazaar -- featuring treasures now outgrown, unsuitable or overlooked -- offers hundreds of children's items for sale. Come to buy or sell items for infants, games, sports equipment, toys and other childhood necessities.This flea market/yard sale is sponsored by the Howard County Department of Recreation and Parks.An exhibitor's fee of $10 buys a 9-by-15-foot space.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | June 19, 1996
Prosecutors allege hundreds of thousands of dollars of drug money landed in Glenwood developer Philip Manglitz's hands. But as his trial drew to a close yesterday, a question his defense posed to jurors was: "Where did it all go?"After nine days of testimony -- but no defense witnesses -- the jury of eight men and four women is expected to begin deliberating Manglitz's fate today.His is the last Maryland case involving a drug ring that operated out of western Howard County for a decade. Manglitz faces a sentence of up to life in prison and a $4 million fine if convicted on charges of money laundering and drug conspiracy and distribution.
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