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By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2001
A path is a path, except when it's in Patapsco Valley State Park - and then environmentalists, preservationists, hikers and bikers start taking sides. Plans to extend the 14,000-acre park's only paved trail were met with intense and heated responses last night at a public hearing for a permit the state Department of Natural Resources needs to cross less than 100 square feet of wetlands. More than 70 people squeezed into a small meeting room in the Howard County government complex in Ellicott City.
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NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2013
A 250-year-old grist mill near the mouth of the Susquehanna River has sat mostly vacant since the end of the Civil War, its thick stone walls serving no purpose but the protection of a few old tools. Though the building is historic - it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places decades ago - it is uncelebrated and receives few visitors. While many old mills are being restored, plans to develop the Cecil County property have stalled. The lack of interest in the old mill is partly due to its owner: the federal government.
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NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Sun Staff Writer | December 7, 1994
Four years ago at Christmas time, Beth Grist grew irritated as she watched her two teen-age nephews rip open the greeting cards she had given them and stuff the money they contained into their pockets."
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2012
Overlook Clipper Mill is a community where groups of duplexes — oddly reminiscent of the 50-year-old TV cartoon show "The Jetsons" — rise up in harmony with the grade of the land on which they have been built. With its primary focus on green and sustainable living, this development in Baltimore's Woodberry neighborhood juxtaposes leading-edge design with Clipper Mill's heritage as a place where the Jones Falls provided waterpower for the operation of grist mills, foundries and textile mills.
FEATURES
April 28, 1991
Union Mills Homestead will open its 1991 season with the 22nd annual Flower and Plant Market and Antique Show, Saturday and next Sunday.In addition to the sale there will be guided tours of the 1797 house, home to six generations of the Shriver family, and the restored 1830 brick grist mill. Lunch can be purchased on the grounds.Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, noon to 4 p.m. Sunday. Admission to the grounds is free, but there is a small charge for tours of the museum and for the antique show.
NEWS
May 10, 1995
The 200 folks who live in Lineboro want to keep things the way they are or, even better, the way they were a century ago when the northeast Carroll County town was a thriving farm and railroad center, and a countryside weekend respite for Baltimore dwellers.That sense of history pervades the village on the Pennsylvania line, (whence its name) even as residents embrace the trappings of modern life.There is a caring concern about the small town pace of life and the relative peace of a community off the main highways, shared by people whose families have been there for generations and by newcomers seeking escape from the urban tempo.
NEWS
By Cindy Parr and Cindy Parr,Contributing Writer | December 11, 1992
In keeping with Christmas tradition, the 22nd annua Poinsettia and Greens Open House will take place this weekend at the Union Mills Homestead.From 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. tomorrow, and from noon to 4 p.m. Sunday, the historic homestead will display an assortment of holiday greenery and decorations for sale.Esther Shriver, executive director of the homestead, said the Tannery Building and Grist Mill will be filled with all types of greens, wreaths, holly, mistletoe and poinsettias."This year, for the first time, we have added live, fresh-cut Douglas fir trees in the greens sale," Mrs. Shriver said.
NEWS
March 31, 2002
Extending trail will help plants, wildlife This letter is in response to the article, "Path of some resistance," published in the Howard County section of The Sun March 24. The Sun article complains that the proposed extension to the existing Grist Mill Trail in the Avalon section of the Patapsco State Park would damage habitat and destroy native species along the river. A careful study of the proposed plan would show that it will actually restore habitat and reintroduce native species into the area.
NEWS
By Ellen Nibali and Ellen Nibali,Contributing Writer | May 24, 1992
Patapsco Valley State Park is inaugurating new amenities and ways to continue services this summer.In the Avalon area near Elkridge, the ever-popular swinging bridge has been repaired and reopened for those who relish its bounce and sway.The Grist Mill Trail along the river will be paved and reopened by July for hikers, bikers and roller bladers. With the swinging bridge connecting to Orange Grove Road on the other side of the river, it creates a 5-mile paved circuit.The paved Grist Mill Trail increases handicapped accessibility in the park, which last year became the first in the state to provide it for all types of park facilities.
NEWS
October 16, 2005
CENTRAL Homestead breakfast set for Saturday The Union Mills Homestead will serve a pancake breakfast from 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. Saturday in the tannery building on the grounds at 3311 Littlestown Pike. The historic Shriver grist mill will provide fresh stone-ground flours for making buckwheat, cornmeal and whole wheat pancakes. The menu also will include country sausage, juice and coffee. The cost is $6 for all you can eat. Tours of the Shriver homestead and grist mill will be available from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. The gift shop opens from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Information: 410-848-2288.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 22, 2010
The nation's most famous hiking trail will soon have a museum to house its artifacts and tell its story. The Appalachian Trail Museum will open June 5 in a 200-year-old grist mill at Pine Grove Furnace State Park, about two hours north of Baltimore and just two miles from the halfway point of the 2,175-mile Appalachian Trail. Potomac Appalachian Trail Club volunteers will rehabilitate the building to bring it up to code and install displays, said Larry Luxenberg, president of the Appalachian Trail Museum Society, who got the ball rolling and began collecting trail memorabilia a dozen years ago. "We have a great collection and we think that when the doors open, artifacts will pour in," he said.
NEWS
By James Oliphant and James Oliphant,Tribune Newspapers | June 30, 2009
WASHINGTON - -The Supreme Court's reversal Monday of a discrimination ruling involving a group of white Connecticut firefighters has provided critics of high court nominee Sonia Sotomayor with some fresh buckshot. The ruling that New Haven firefighters were unfairly denied promotions because of their race became an instant talking point for conservative foes of Sotomayor. They argued that her court's decision to the contrary last year shows she would be an activist who allows her biases - particularly her backing of affirmative action policies - to taint her judgment.
FEATURES
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,sun reporter | November 9, 2006
For conservative radio talk-show hosts, the power shift in Congress is not necessarily a cause for gloom. In fact, some of the hosts say, the new Democratic majority presents them with a golden opportunity. "It probably gives talk radio another two years of things to talk about," said Frank Luber, co-host of The Sean and Frank Show in the mornings on Baltimore's WCBM. The station broadcasts shows by several conservative commentators, including Sean Hannity and Rush Limbaugh, who was widely criticized recently for his mimicry of Michael J. Fox's ads in support of Democratic candidates' backing stem-cell research.
NEWS
By NICK MADIGAN and NICK MADIGAN,SUN REPORTER | March 19, 2006
NEW YORK / / The crime had all the ingredients: the brutal murder of an attractive young woman after a night on the town, her lacerated body dumped along a desolate Brooklyn street; a scramble for clues by harried detectives under heavy pressure to track down the killer; and finally, the emergence of a suspect with a dark, violent past. The rape and killing of Imette St. Guillen on Feb. 25 has sent the New York tabloids into their characteristic frenzy of sensational reporting and shrieking headlines, all but shoving aside most other human concerns.
NEWS
October 16, 2005
CENTRAL Homestead breakfast set for Saturday The Union Mills Homestead will serve a pancake breakfast from 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. Saturday in the tannery building on the grounds at 3311 Littlestown Pike. The historic Shriver grist mill will provide fresh stone-ground flours for making buckwheat, cornmeal and whole wheat pancakes. The menu also will include country sausage, juice and coffee. The cost is $6 for all you can eat. Tours of the Shriver homestead and grist mill will be available from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. The gift shop opens from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Information: 410-848-2288.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | October 6, 2004
Sharp questions of ideological bias in the media have been raised for more than three decades, but news organizations appear to be more vulnerable -- and sensitive -- than ever to the charges. In separate incidents over the past week, three major news organizations -- Fox News Channel, MSNBC and The Wall Street Journal -- have come under public fire for the perceived slant of reporters or contributors. The details provoking the three cases are starkly different. On the merits, readers and viewers may look askance at the behavior of any of the three media figures involved in the episodes.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2012
Overlook Clipper Mill is a community where groups of duplexes — oddly reminiscent of the 50-year-old TV cartoon show "The Jetsons" — rise up in harmony with the grade of the land on which they have been built. With its primary focus on green and sustainable living, this development in Baltimore's Woodberry neighborhood juxtaposes leading-edge design with Clipper Mill's heritage as a place where the Jones Falls provided waterpower for the operation of grist mills, foundries and textile mills.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | July 18, 2004
A slow flirtation with a steady burn": that's what movie-maker Richard Linklater was after when he planned Before Sunset as an 80-minute amble through Paris with an American and a Frenchwoman. The man is a novelist named Jesse (Ethan Hawke) and the woman is Celine (Julie Delpy), who inspired his new book with a life-altering one-night stand nine years before in Vienna (as chronicled in Linklater's 1995 film, Before Sunrise). They were supposed to meet in Vienna again, six months after their first tryst.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Alan Zarembo and Alan Zarembo,Los Angeles Times | October 12, 2003
SANTA FE, N.M. -- Standing before a roomful of fellow Ph.D.s, Louise Krasneiwicz wears an untucked shirt -- a multihued collage of musclemen and "championship" banners. Perched on a chair near her podium is a poster from Flex magazine featuring a bare-chested Arnold Schwarzenegger from his bodybuilding days. "We think that Arnold Schwarzenegger's extensive influence and remarkable presence in late 20th-century American culture has gone beyond inspiration, hero worship and entertainment," she tells the captive audience at the School of American Research here, where she is a research associate.
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