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February 9, 2007
On February 5, 2007, DARIA KRYSTEN. Survived by Parents, Darren D. Grimsley and Karen D. Stone, Brothers, Kai, Sean, Ian, Antwaine and Chivaliea, Sisters, Dionna, Briante, Grandparents, Jesse H. and Laverne S. Engram and Wilmont M. Grimsley and Joann Toney, two Uncles, Seven Aunts and a host of other family and friends. Friends may call the WYLIE FUNERAL HOME P.A OF BALTIMORE COUNTY, 9200 Liberty Road Friday from 6-8 P.M. Services Saturday in the Chapel of the above mentioned funeral home 10:00 Wake10:30 A.M. Funeral.
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SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | February 12, 2009
Miguel Tejada's guilty plea yesterday might give credibility to Rafael Palmeiro's claims that he received contaminated B-12 from Tejada. The Jason Grimsley affidavit in 2006 was the first hint Palmeiro might have plausible deniability. ( For more, go to baltimoresun.com/schmuckblog)
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SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,Sun Staff Writer | August 31, 1995
Ross Grimsley considers it an amusing coincidence that he's managing the Amarillo Dillas in the independent Texas-Louisiana League.Near the end of his pitching career, when he was trying to catch on again with the Orioles and was working out in Baltimore, he told a Cleveland writer who asked what he was doing that he was raising armadillos in Cockeysville."
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | December 23, 2007
Now can we all stop taking the simplistic, easy-to-swallow approach to steroids in baseball? Can we all admit that this is way more complex than we've been treating it over the years? All of us. Baseball and union officials. Fans. Media. The Justice Department. Congress. It is obvious now, more than ever, that we don't know what we're dealing with. How much more proof do we need that we, the entire baseball-observing public, have handled the issue of performance-enhancing drugs all wrong?
SPORTS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 3, 2006
The U.S. Attorney's office in San Francisco issued a statement yesterday questioning the accuracy of a Los Angeles Times report published over the weekend. The story identified major league baseball players, including three Orioles, whose names had been blacked out of a steroid investigation affidavit filed earlier this year in federal court. The Times report described a search warrant affidavit signed by an IRS special agent investigating steroid use in professional baseball. The affidavit, based on statements to investigators allegedly made by pitcher Jason Grimsley, implicated a number of his former teammates as users of performance-enhancing drugs.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | June 18, 2005
IF THE Orioles were going nowhere again this season, it wouldn't matter that reliever Jason Grimsley was making a semi-miraculous and somewhat mysterious recovery from Tommy John surgery. Who cares about a 37-year-old pitcher on a losing team? But with the Orioles trying to turn their surprisingly fast start into a yearlong run for the playoffs, Grimsley's possible return looms as the definitive test of the good karma that has surrounded the club throughout the season. When veteran pitching help unexpectedly falls out of the sky and lands in your bullpen - just in time to shape your trading deadline plans and possibly make a difference down the stretch - it could be that you're destined to get all the breaks and accomplish big things.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | June 11, 2006
Welcome to the worst nightmare of the Major League Baseball Players Association. Former Orioles relief pitcher Jason Grimsley might have created a portal to a new era of enforcement in baseball's battle to eradicate illegal performance-enhancing drugs. Call it a loophole if you want. Major League Baseball recently embarked on a wide-ranging investigation to determine the true extent of the sport's steroid problem, but it appeared powerless to punish past offenders because the collectively bargained anti-steroid program requires a positive urine test to trigger specific disciplinary action.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,Sun Reporter | December 21, 2007
Three prominent 2007 Orioles who were named as steroid users last year in a Los Angeles Times report on the infamous Jason Grimsley affidavit were never mentioned as using performance-enhancing drugs in that document, which was unsealed by federal prosecutors yesterday. Current Orioles second baseman Brian Roberts and outfielder Jay Gibbons were not included at all in Grimsley's sworn testimony and neither were New York Yankees pitchers Roger Clemens and Andy Pettitte, who also were implicated in the Times report.
SPORTS
By Baltimoresun.com Staff | July 14, 2005
The Orioles continued a makeover of their bullpen today, recalling right-hander Jason Grimsley from his rehab assignment and designating veteran Steve Reed for assignment. Grimsley went 2-0 with a 1.13 ERA and four strikeouts in eight rehab appearances totaling eight innings at Double-A Bowie. He is recovering from ulnar collateral ligament surgery - commonly referred to as Tommy John surgery - performed last October and was on the 60-day disabled list. Grimsley was acquired by the Orioles from Kansas City last season and went 2-4 with a 4.21 ERA in 41 games.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,SUN STAFF | June 18, 2005
An injury picture that has been bleak for much of the season is getting better by the day for the Orioles, who learned that Jason Grimsley might be available in their bullpen in about a month. Grimsley was expected to be out for the season after having ligament-reconstruction surgery, more commonly known as Tommy John surgery, on his right elbow in October. However, he will rejoin his teammates today and begin throwing off the mound under the guidance of pitching coach Ray Miller. Orioles executive vice president Jim Beattie said Grimsley will pitch several bullpen sessions and then likely go on a rehab assignment.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | December 22, 2007
If the original release of the infamous Jason Grimsley affidavit - with the names of the alleged steroid and amphetamine users blacked out for public nonconsumption - helped pull the cover off baseball's performance-enhancement scandal, the release of the unredacted version Thursday might have been an even bigger blow to the integrity of the sport. Think about it. When the feds decided to throw those last few names into the public arena, they probably never considered how the surprising absence of several well-known players might undermine the credibility of the Mitchell Report and create a new layer of uncertainty about the steroid era. Of course, it isn't the job of federal investigators to worry about the effect of their work on a private enterprise, even one that is considered to be the national pastime.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,Sun Reporter | December 21, 2007
Three prominent 2007 Orioles who were named as steroid users last year in a Los Angeles Times report on the infamous Jason Grimsley affidavit were never mentioned as using performance-enhancing drugs in that document, which was unsealed by federal prosecutors yesterday. Current Orioles second baseman Brian Roberts and outfielder Jay Gibbons were not included at all in Grimsley's sworn testimony and neither were New York Yankees pitchers Roger Clemens and Andy Pettitte, who also were implicated in the Times report.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | April 1, 2007
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- Spring training went by so fast, I didn't even get the license plate. It seems like only yesterday I arrived at Fort Lauderdale Stadium and discovered that someone had kidnapped cuddly little Sam Perlozzo and replaced him with the new, improved Tough Sammy. How tough? I heard a rumor that when Sidney Ponson came to town with the Minnesota Twins, he was so intimidated that he didn't have his first beer until the fourth inning. OK, that was just plain wrong, but the new Sammy clearly was focused on making sure the Orioles did not leave a fundamental stone unturned during the early weeks of spring training.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | March 4, 2007
It is Groundhog Day all over again in Baltimore. This time, cute little Jerry Hairston Jr. has poked his head out of baseball's black hole of steroid suspicion, guaranteeing at least six more weeks of the sport's seemingly endless performance enhancement scandal. Another day. Another disturbing revelation. Another former Oriole. Sports Illustrated reported Friday that Hairston's name has been connected to purchases of human growth hormone in a wide-ranging investigation of shady pharmacies and prescription-selling doctors.
NEWS
February 9, 2007
On February 5, 2007, DARIA KRYSTEN. Survived by Parents, Darren D. Grimsley and Karen D. Stone, Brothers, Kai, Sean, Ian, Antwaine and Chivaliea, Sisters, Dionna, Briante, Grandparents, Jesse H. and Laverne S. Engram and Wilmont M. Grimsley and Joann Toney, two Uncles, Seven Aunts and a host of other family and friends. Friends may call the WYLIE FUNERAL HOME P.A OF BALTIMORE COUNTY, 9200 Liberty Road Friday from 6-8 P.M. Services Saturday in the Chapel of the above mentioned funeral home 10:00 Wake10:30 A.M. Funeral.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,Sun Reporter | October 9, 2006
Consider Lance Armstrong and Barry Bonds. Both reached unmatched heights of performance in their chosen sports. Some fans believe neither could have hit such pinnacles without the help of performance-enhancing drugs. Journalists have spent enormous time and effort trying to suss out links between those great feats and drugs. Neither athlete has failed a drug test. The similarities end there. Armstrong is a coveted corporate spokesman, hosts television awards shows and raises tens of millions of dollars a year to fight cancer.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | August 13, 2004
ANAHEIM, Calif. - Orioles reliever Jason Grimsley stayed on the active roster yesterday while the team determined the severity of his hip injury. Grimsley strained his left hip flexor after stepping in a hole during Monday's game at Camden Yards. The cramping sensation returned two nights later as he threw high to first base, and the error contributed to a 4-2 loss to the Anaheim Angels that halted the Orioles' winning streak at eight. Asked yesterday if the disabled list is a consideration, manager Lee Mazzilli said, "No, not right now. He's going to go out and throw again and see how it feels."
SPORTS
By CHILDS WALKER and CHILDS WALKER,SUN REPORTER | June 10, 2006
The player at the center of baseball's latest drug controversy, Jason Grimsley, is perhaps more distinguished by the company he kept than anything he did in his 15-year career. He has played with everyone from Lenny Dykstra to Eddie Murray to Derek Jeter. He won two World Series rings as an anonymous bullpen guy for the star-studded New York Yankees of 1999 and 2000. He was the guy who climbed through a false ceiling to swipe Albert Belle's corked bat from the umpires' locker room in 1994.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | October 4, 2006
The whisper campaign started almost as soon as news broke that federal agents had raided the home of former Orioles pitcher Jason Grimsley and a document existed that included the names of current and former major league players who may have been involved with steroids, human growth hormone and amphetamines. That was four months ago, and only in the past few days have those whispers taken the shape of real people with real reputations who have - fairly or not - been damaged by the published reports that they were identified as steroid users in the infamous Grimsley affidavit.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,Sun Reporter | October 4, 2006
The attorney for former Orioles reliever Jason Grimsley told The Arizona Republic that Grimsley did not attribute steroid use to Orioles Miguel Tejada, Brian Roberts or Jay Gibbons in an interview with federal investigators in April. "As to all five players [including the Houston Astros' Roger Clemens and Andy Pettitte] named, Jason did not attribute steroid use to any of them," the attorney, Ed Novak, said in yesterday's edition of the Republic. "There was no mention of Roberts or Gibbons at all," Novak said.
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