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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2013
The "Summer '13" show at C. Grimaldis Gallery brings together an eclectic, invigorating mix of artists and media. It's a great opportunity to get up close with, say, the late Grace Hartigan's bold and massive - 6-and-half-feet-by-11-feet - "St. George and the Dragon," a 1970 work long housed at Old Saint Paul's Church. There's something at once sobering and whimsical about this abstract painting, which, at $95,000, also happens to be the priciest piece in the exhibit. On the opposite side of the spectrum, in size and price ($1,500)
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
Around the turn of the 20th century, ancient Chinese poetry grabbed fresh attention in the West and provided inspiration for some notable works. Austrian composer Gustav Mahler, for example, found in a set of German translations of Li Po the impetus to create "Das Lied von der Erde" ("The Song of the Earth"). And four years after the 1911 posthumous premiere of that profound music, American poet Ezra Pound published "Cathay," his influential interpretations of Li Po and other Chinese poets.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2013
For most of John Ruppert's career, metal sculpture has been a major focus, but he has added photography to his pursuits lately. Some of the results can be sampled and savored in an exhibit at C. Grimaldis Gallery titled "The Iceland Project. " The Massachusetts-born artist, who has a studio in Druid Hill, was one of the first winners of the $25,000 Baker Prize in 2009. He has been a faculty member at the University of Maryland, College Park, since 1987 and chair of its art department for the past 15 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2013
For most of John Ruppert's career, metal sculpture has been a major focus, but he has added photography to his pursuits lately. Some of the results can be sampled and savored in an exhibit at C. Grimaldis Gallery titled "The Iceland Project. " The Massachusetts-born artist, who has a studio in Druid Hill, was one of the first winners of the $25,000 Baker Prize in 2009. He has been a faculty member at the University of Maryland, College Park, since 1987 and chair of its art department for the past 15 years.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Evening Sun | October 11, 1990
It's not often that new paintings by an old man seem so exploratory, but the new landscape paintings that 79-year-old Eugene Leake is showing at the Grimaldis Gallery are alive in their every brushstroke.Although Leake has been an artist for a long time, much of his energy went into his administrative duties as president of the Maryland Institute College of Art from 1961 to 1974. Upon retiring from the school post, he put his full energies into painting again. In a series of increasingly strong exhibits at the Grimaldis Gallery, Leake has liberated his brushstroke and experimented more and more as he goes along.
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By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Evening Sun | January 16, 1992
Sculptors Ilan Averbuch, Jene Highstein, Ulrich Ruckriem and Wade Saunders may not be cut from the same mold, but their group show at the C. Grimaldis Gallery is still a harmonious gathering. There is a shared respect in their work for stone and wood that have been shaped without losing all sense of rough natural origins.Ulrich Ruckriem, for instance, likes to use dolomite and slate. His untitled column and floor piece are carefully crafted sculptures in which his penchant for geometrical order is expressed through sectioned blocks that leave no doubt as to who is in charge here: the sculptor, not his material.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | May 13, 1992
The works of Mary Page Evans and Tammra Sigler make an interesting combination at C. Grimaldis Gallery, for though they are in some ways quite different there are also comparisons to be drawn.Evans' big abstracted paintings of gardens, flowers and trees have obvious antecedents in the paintings of the impressionists and in the work of Joan Mitchell. Mitchell's work, however, though it has a lyric strain, tends to be more abstract and tougher than Evans' lusher, softer versions of landscape.
FEATURES
By Eric Siegel and John Dorsey | July 12, 1991
The C. Grimaldis Gallery, the city's most prominent commercial art gallery and a fixture on Charles Street for nearly a decade and a half, is moving out of its location at 523 N. Charles St. after this month and will consolidate its exhibitions at the 1006 Morton St. location it opened 19 months ago."It no longer makes sense to have two spaces in Baltimore in this economy," said gallery owner Constantine Grimaldis, who has operated his gallery at 523 N. Charles St. for the past five years and at 928 N. Charles St. for nine years before that.
NEWS
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2009
At the opening night party for the "Sublime Structure" exhibit at C. Grimaldis Gallery, featured artist Lu Zhang's creative hand wasn't just apparent in her paintings on the wall. The 26-year-old artist and model designer for Development Design Group makes a statement with her personal style, too. "My style is all over the place. I like to put my own spin on things but not really stand out too much. ... I think it's a combination of going to art school and now [working] in the corporate environment for an architectural firm.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | April 10, 2003
For more than 30 years, painter Raoul Middleman has been one of Baltimore's most prolific and readily identifiable artists. Middleman checks in again this season with a delectable exhibit of landscape paintings at C. Grimaldis Gallery through May 3. Middleman's work is a refreshing break from the by now ubiquitous blue landscapes that have dominated decorative paintings of Maryland and similarly picturesque locales for decades. Instead, Middleman renders these scenes afresh with great warmth and affection through calculated use of reds, oranges and yellows that complement the cool hues of sky, water and greenery.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2013
The "Summer '13" show at C. Grimaldis Gallery brings together an eclectic, invigorating mix of artists and media. It's a great opportunity to get up close with, say, the late Grace Hartigan's bold and massive - 6-and-half-feet-by-11-feet - "St. George and the Dragon," a 1970 work long housed at Old Saint Paul's Church. There's something at once sobering and whimsical about this abstract painting, which, at $95,000, also happens to be the priciest piece in the exhibit. On the opposite side of the spectrum, in size and price ($1,500)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2013
Works in living black and white provide fascinating experiences at the C. Grimaldis Gallery. Two artists working in different media are highlighted in an exhibit that challenges the way we see familiar images - or what we assume to be familiar images. Dennis Lee Mitchell, receiving his first solo show at Grimaldis, employs smoke to create pieces that exude, simultaneously, remarkable calmness and volatility. The technique involves lighting a blow torch and applying the resulting carbon to paper.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2011
Engaging, museum-level work fills two venues in Baltimore. Maryland Art Place has assembled a remarkable survey of minimalist painters from different areas and generations, while C. Grimaldis Gallery is offering a collection of pieces by five exceptional artists who produced work locally. The Grimaldis show, "Five Maryland Icons," provides a richly varied experience — and, for those in the market, a fairly expensive one, with most of the pieces priced from $3,500 to $125,000.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2011
For some, the sight of a faceless garage or a squat chain store or a long stretch of tract housing barely registers; there's just nothing unusual about such things. For artist Sofia Silva, they mean a lot. And, once framed by her camera lens, they are imbued with provocative power. Nearly a dozen of Silva's photographs form an exhibit, "Meditations on the Landscape of Desire," one of two solo shows on display at C. Grimaldis Gallery (the other show features intriguing sculptural pieces by Lu Zhang)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2010
One way to counter the heat is with a jolt of cool contemporary art, and exhibits at two commercial venues — C. Grimaldis Gallery in Mount Vernon, Jordan Faye Contemporary in Federal Hill — conveniently provide such relief. For good measure, the Jordan Faye gallery is also throwing a block party Saturday afternoon. "That seemed like a great summer thing to do," says founder and owner Jordan Faye Block. This sort of gesture has helped make the gallery a good fit for the neighborhood since opening 11 months ago in a handsome 1880s building that originally housed a branch of the Enoch Pratt Library.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | tim.smith@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 12, 2010
The horizontal, rectangular photograph, stretching 80 inches across a wall of C. Grimaldis Gallery, jolts the viewer with a sea of aluminum siding. In the far left corner, a piece of bold blue sky can be seen behind a jutting, K-style gutter. Welcome to "Wasteland." This image by Sofia Silva, titled "siding," is one of 20 compelling works in an exhibit that casts an eye - at once coolly objective and hotly provocative - on a desensitized world. "It's about wasted time, wasted things, wasted political systems," Grimaldis says of the show, which features six artists, most of them local.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | April 2, 1992
Grace Hartigan's "Another Hunt," one of the best works in her new show at C. Grimaldis Gallery, takes us on a little trip through the history of modern art while remaining thoroughly Hartigan and thoroughly contemporary.Its horses and riders remind us of Degas, but there's something about the principal rider's black hat and formal air that speaks of Manet. The spattering of yellow paint that seems to hover over the surface can, of course, recall Seurat's pointillism, but the yellow and the brilliant red riders' coats combine to suggest the dazzle of impressionist dabs of brightness.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2011
Engaging, museum-level work fills two venues in Baltimore. Maryland Art Place has assembled a remarkable survey of minimalist painters from different areas and generations, while C. Grimaldis Gallery is offering a collection of pieces by five exceptional artists who produced work locally. The Grimaldis show, "Five Maryland Icons," provides a richly varied experience — and, for those in the market, a fairly expensive one, with most of the pieces priced from $3,500 to $125,000.
NEWS
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2009
At the opening night party for the "Sublime Structure" exhibit at C. Grimaldis Gallery, featured artist Lu Zhang's creative hand wasn't just apparent in her paintings on the wall. The 26-year-old artist and model designer for Development Design Group makes a statement with her personal style, too. "My style is all over the place. I like to put my own spin on things but not really stand out too much. ... I think it's a combination of going to art school and now [working] in the corporate environment for an architectural firm.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | September 3, 2009
"The Universe and the Side of My Body," a huge study in red oil on wood by Kim Manfredi, is not just an eye-catcher in the new show at C. Grimaldis Gallery. It's deeply provocative. A couple of sagging globs of paint on the upper portion of the four, 96-inch-square panels seem to be on the verge of shifting downward, threatening to invade two circular images formed by the perforation of tiny holes with a drill. Those orbs simultaneously suggest microscopic cells and planets adrift in a blood-dense sky. The piece is representative of the intriguing premise of "Sublime Structure," an exhibit that features several Maryland Institute College of Art alumni.
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