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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2010
Who knew Baltimore's devastating fire of 1904 could look so cool? Not that artist David Brewster intended such an effect. But his large, strikingly colored works depicting that event, displayed in the "Conflagration" exhibit at C. Grimaldis Gallery, entertain the eye as much as they capture history. The bold orange and brown strokes of oil in the epic-sized "Spectacular Destruction/Great Baltimore Fire: View Southeast from Continental Trust Building (1904)" make a particularly compelling impression.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
Around the turn of the 20th century, ancient Chinese poetry grabbed fresh attention in the West and provided inspiration for some notable works. Austrian composer Gustav Mahler, for example, found in a set of German translations of Li Po the impetus to create "Das Lied von der Erde" ("The Song of the Earth"). And four years after the 1911 posthumous premiere of that profound music, American poet Ezra Pound published "Cathay," his influential interpretations of Li Po and other Chinese poets.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | July 12, 1994
The rear gallery at Grimaldis has the big news now.As usual in summer, the larger front gallery has a group show of Grimaldis' regular artists -- Grace Hartigan, Eugene Leake, Mel Kendrick and others. But gallery owner Constantine Grimaldis, who usually shows well-established artists, gives his rear gallery this month and next to two recent graduates of the Hoffberger School of Painting at the Maryland Institute, College of Art, both former students of Grace Hartigan."I felt that they should be seen," he says.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2013
For most of John Ruppert's career, metal sculpture has been a major focus, but he has added photography to his pursuits lately. Some of the results can be sampled and savored in an exhibit at C. Grimaldis Gallery titled "The Iceland Project. " The Massachusetts-born artist, who has a studio in Druid Hill, was one of the first winners of the $25,000 Baker Prize in 2009. He has been a faculty member at the University of Maryland, College Park, since 1987 and chair of its art department for the past 15 years.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | July 11, 1995
A visit to Grimaldis' summer group show brings back the past with such a rush that it's almost like an exercise in escape. Not that we're talking nostalgia here; these artists are not that kind. But their works do recall other eras.Grace Hartigan, who often mines art history, gives us "Ask Me No More," a painting that features a hefty couple who might be a Venus and Adonis borrowed from Rubens. They face John Van Alstine's sculpture "Implement XXV (River Arc)," whose components include half of a stone mill wheel and a curving bronze element inspired by a scythe handle.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | July 15, 1991
The elements of landscape are so amenable to variations of treatment that it's not surprising they have been used by all manner of artists, from realists to abstract expressionists. This month the C. Grimaldis Gallery at 523 N. Charles St. has "Perceptual Painting: Landscape" (through July 27), bringing together a group of artists who use landscapes in differing ways, with differing results and differing degrees of success.Of the six painters represented, Wolf Kahn's quiet oils withtheir pastel-like colors may seem at first the most modest of all. But in Kahn there is a distillation of color and a depth of feeling thatpersist and expand in the consciousness.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | May 12, 1995
"Geometric Abstraction," writes distinguished art curator Charles Millard, is "a continuation of the classical tradition . . . [and] perhaps the most important of the 20th century expressions in paint of the spirit of Poussin and Ingres, as opposed to Rubens and Delacroix, the contemporary embodiment of the linear, as opposed to the painterly."The large, handsome exhibit of "Geometric Abstraction" at Grimaldis is accompanied by Millard's succinct and informative essay, whose points are much in evidence in the show.
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By John Dorsey | January 6, 1993
The C. Grimaldis Gallery, one of Baltimore's leadin commercial art galleries, will move from its present location at 1006 Morton St. to downtown Charles Street in March.Gallery owner Constantine Grimaldis said yesterday that his new space would be on Charles Street but that he couldn't confirm an exact location because negotiations were continuing.The Mitchell Baker Galerie will be vacating Grimaldis' former site at 523 N. Charles St. at the end of January, and there is speculation that Grimaldis would move there.
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By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Evening Sun | December 13, 1990
The California-based conceptual artist John Baldessari gained a reputation in the 1960s and '70s for works that combined texts and photographic images in ways that forced viewers to reconsider the relationship between word and image. Baldessari was challenging our notions about meaning in art, and even our notions about what could be considered art.It's possible to take a crash course in Baldessari at the moment. If the exhibit of his recent work running at the Grimaldis Gallery in Baltimore through Jan. 12 has you wondering where this guy is coming from, why then simply take a trip to the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington, where an extensive Baldessari retrospective remains through Jan. 6.One of the more notable aspects of the retrospective is to see how Baldessari's recent work is less reliant on printed words and makes more extensive use of paint applied to the photographic imagery.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | March 12, 1991
A "stable" show, such as C. Grimaldis has at his 523 N. Charles St. gallery through April 13, is hard to review. Consisting of one to three works by each of a baker's dozen of artists whom the gallery regularly shows, it doesn't give an in-depth look at anybody and includes some works seen before.The show is not without its points of interest, however. The principal one this time comes from two landscapes by Henry Coe, "Owls Starting to Call" and "Hutchins Mill Pasture." Rash as it may be to go out on a limb on the basis of such a sampling, it just possible that Coe has taken a significant step since his last show here.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2013
The "Summer '13" show at C. Grimaldis Gallery brings together an eclectic, invigorating mix of artists and media. It's a great opportunity to get up close with, say, the late Grace Hartigan's bold and massive - 6-and-half-feet-by-11-feet - "St. George and the Dragon," a 1970 work long housed at Old Saint Paul's Church. There's something at once sobering and whimsical about this abstract painting, which, at $95,000, also happens to be the priciest piece in the exhibit. On the opposite side of the spectrum, in size and price ($1,500)
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2013
Works in living black and white provide fascinating experiences at the C. Grimaldis Gallery. Two artists working in different media are highlighted in an exhibit that challenges the way we see familiar images - or what we assume to be familiar images. Dennis Lee Mitchell, receiving his first solo show at Grimaldis, employs smoke to create pieces that exude, simultaneously, remarkable calmness and volatility. The technique involves lighting a blow torch and applying the resulting carbon to paper.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2012
Two cool summertime art exhibits located in different neighborhoods, and very much in different financial brackets, provide welcome diversion from the heat. C. Grimaldis Gallery in Mount Vernon offers a show that brings together several notable artists who have long been associated with the gallery, including Grace Hartigan, Eugene Leake and Anthony Caro. The price tags: $1,500 to $90,000. School 33 in Federal Hill has the diverse "Magically Suspicious" show on one floor, and two spaces devoted to individual artists upstairs.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2012
Alexey Titarenko's black-and-white photographs conjure up gray areas between motion and inertia, living and getting by, past and present. The images haunt, and are haunted. For the third time since 2003, Baltimore's C. Grimaldis Gallery is presenting a Titarenko exhibit. This one focuses on the place where the 50-year-old Russian photographer was born — known then as Leningrad and, since the fall of the Soviet government, as St. Petersburg. The photographer, whose works have been exhibited widely and are now in museums in Europe and the U.S., started taking pictures in the 1970s but stayed largely underground until perestroika allowed for freer artistic expression.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2011
Engaging, museum-level work fills two venues in Baltimore. Maryland Art Place has assembled a remarkable survey of minimalist painters from different areas and generations, while C. Grimaldis Gallery is offering a collection of pieces by five exceptional artists who produced work locally. The Grimaldis show, "Five Maryland Icons," provides a richly varied experience — and, for those in the market, a fairly expensive one, with most of the pieces priced from $3,500 to $125,000.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2011
For some, the sight of a faceless garage or a squat chain store or a long stretch of tract housing barely registers; there's just nothing unusual about such things. For artist Sofia Silva, they mean a lot. And, once framed by her camera lens, they are imbued with provocative power. Nearly a dozen of Silva's photographs form an exhibit, "Meditations on the Landscape of Desire," one of two solo shows on display at C. Grimaldis Gallery (the other show features intriguing sculptural pieces by Lu Zhang)
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | May 24, 2005
Renowned Baltimore painter Grace Hartigan returns to C. Grimaldis Gallery this month with a delightful exhibition of works on paper spanning her career from the 1950s to the present. Hartigan is well known as a painter; she made her reputation as a pioneering abstract-expressionist in New York during the 1950s, when her peers included artists like Jackson Pollack, Robert Motherwell and Willem de Kooning. The Grimaldis exhibition presents vivid examples of how Hartigan successfully translated the Ab-Exers' signature "all-over" style to works on paper rather than canvas.
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By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | June 14, 2006
The summer sculpture show at C. Grimaldis gallery presents a half-dozen artists who have had solo exhibitions at the venue over the past two years and whose return as a group offers gallery patrons an opportunity to revisit some of the highlights of previous seasons. Grimaldis introduced Baltimoreans to German artist Annette Sauermann's luminous wall-relief sculptures in 2004, when her series of rectangular cast concrete blocks linked by thin, translucent sheets of white plastic film were first shown at the gallery.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2010
One way to counter the heat is with a jolt of cool contemporary art, and exhibits at two commercial venues — C. Grimaldis Gallery in Mount Vernon, Jordan Faye Contemporary in Federal Hill — conveniently provide such relief. For good measure, the Jordan Faye gallery is also throwing a block party Saturday afternoon. "That seemed like a great summer thing to do," says founder and owner Jordan Faye Block. This sort of gesture has helped make the gallery a good fit for the neighborhood since opening 11 months ago in a handsome 1880s building that originally housed a branch of the Enoch Pratt Library.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2010
Who knew Baltimore's devastating fire of 1904 could look so cool? Not that artist David Brewster intended such an effect. But his large, strikingly colored works depicting that event, displayed in the "Conflagration" exhibit at C. Grimaldis Gallery, entertain the eye as much as they capture history. The bold orange and brown strokes of oil in the epic-sized "Spectacular Destruction/Great Baltimore Fire: View Southeast from Continental Trust Building (1904)" make a particularly compelling impression.
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