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By Maria Hiaasen | July 2, 1997
Item: Mrs. Paul's Grilled FilletsWhat you get: Two fillets (7.4 ounces)Cost: $2.89Time to prepare: 20 minutes conventional oven, or 5 minutes in the microwave for one fillet, 8 minutes in the microwave for two fillets.Review: Summer's here. Grilled fish sounds great, but who has time to stand in line for fresh fillets? Mrs. Paul's solves your time crunch. OK, so these aren't swordfish steaks, but these fillets of pollock come nicely seasoned and prepare consistently in either conventional oven or microwave.
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By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2011
The good name of Chablis was virtually ruined for a long time by American winemakers who hijacked the name to slap on their cheapest white wines. But there is a real place called Chablis in Burgundy, and it produces chardonnays with a distinctive style — of which this is a sterling example. Spared the heavy-handed influence of new oak, the pure flavors of the fruit and the soil come through crystal clear. There are hints of lemon, orange, green apple, minerals and subtle spices. It's expensive, yes, but this is the real deal, the product of a great vintage and an excellent gift for a devotee of fine dry white wine.
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By ROB KASPER | August 8, 1993
Summer is a good time to grill a slab of fish for supper. Grilling gives you an excuse to spend time outside, tending the fire and drinking in the evening air or whatever else you want to drink.The cooking style gives most pieces of fish a distinctive flavor. Tuna, for instance, tastes much better when it has been cooked over a charcoal fire than when it has been baked in an oven.My time over the grill has taught me that once you've figured out how to cook the fish without destroying it, the next step to backyard bliss is finding the right sauce to serve with the grilled fish.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jasmine Wiggins | May 3, 2011
I grew up in Arizona and Mexican food has been a big part of my life and culture. I loved eating homemade tamales that someone had lovingly labored over for hours, or my mom’s enchiladas with green sauce.  I can’t miss a Cinco de Mayo, so I’ve cooked up some of my favorites just in time for a celebration. Try them out or get inspired in time for Thursday!   Grilled Fish Tacos 1 lb firm white fish Sea salt Black pepper Chili powder Olive oil 8 small tortillas Prepare grill.
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By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to The Sun | August 16, 1995
Make the most of grill season with a speedy and simple seared fish fillet crowned with a refreshing salsa. The star of the salsa is a mango, which is combined with other seasonal fresh vegetables that set off the aromatic fruit.Mangoes have become more readily available in area grocery stores in the last few years. Watch for more reasonable prices now that it's high season, which runs from May to September. Mangoes have been advertised as low as 2 for $1.Mangoes have so much vibrant flavor they need little adornment.
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By Tina Danze and Tina Danze,Universal Press Syndicate | June 17, 1998
The two traditions make an ideal combination - firing up the grill and celebrating Father's Day.Summer ushers in the grilling season, time to hit the deck and pull the cover off the grill - unless you are a fan of all-weather grilling.Instead of the traditional steak or burgers for Dad on Sunday, try seafood for something a little different. A Cajun Catfish Sandwich is as down-home as a burger. Charcoal-Grilled Trout With Herbs adds a light but tasty touch to a menu of grilled onions, corn on the cob, potato salad and coleslaw.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | March 31, 2002
The Black Olive is a restaurant critic's restaurant. Baltimoreans, though, continue to have mixed feelings about it. Critics rave about the simplicity and sophistication of the grilled fish and Greek specialties. But some people want more luxe surroundings and more elaborate service for what it costs to eat there -- which is, admittedly, a lot. The problem is that until the Black Olive opened five years ago, local diners put Greek food in the cheap eats category. Going to a Greek restaurant where entrees started at $15 (they now start at $22)
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By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | May 10, 1998
When I was growing up in the South, I remember that when my mother planned a dinner party she always chose meat or chicken as the main course. Fish was never a part of her menu. As a consequence, when I began to cook on my own, I, too, omitted Neptunian fare when entertaining.Gradually, I changed my attitude about fish. As supermarkets began to overflow with fresh seafood, and as more cookbooks featured fish and enticing ways to serve it, I became an enthusiast. I discovered how quickly - usually in minutes - seafood can be cooked and how delicious it is even when simply prepared.
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By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2010
From: Maryland Price: $11 Serve with: Crab cakes, grilled fish Maryland's oldest winery has come up with a winner in this fruity, lively, fresh pinot grigio, which surpasses the quality of most of its price peers from California or Italy. It's a well-balanced, dry white wine with flavors of citrus, nuts, peach and pears. It would be best to enjoy it in its youth, but it should hold up well until the 2010 is released.
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By Maria Hiaasen | May 6, 1998
Item: Mrs. Paul's Premium Fillets in SauceCost: About $4Servings per container: 2Preparation time: 14 to 17 minutes in conventional oven, 5 to 7 minutes (for two fillets) in the microwaveReview: Sure, the picture on the box looked like grilled fish from a restaurant, but I found nothing premium about these fillets. Fact is, I found them downright awful. I sampled both the teriyaki tuna and the honey mustard salmon. The sauce on each tasted inexplicably sweet and overpowered the fish. I have another bone to pick; I followed the instructions, but both varieties of fish turned out overcooked.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2010
From: Maryland Price: $11 Serve with: Crab cakes, grilled fish Maryland's oldest winery has come up with a winner in this fruity, lively, fresh pinot grigio, which surpasses the quality of most of its price peers from California or Italy. It's a well-balanced, dry white wine with flavors of citrus, nuts, peach and pears. It would be best to enjoy it in its youth, but it should hold up well until the 2010 is released.
NEWS
By Amy Scattergood and Amy Scattergood,Los Angeles Times | August 29, 2007
It's is hard to pin down what is great about a great taco. Is it the succulent, smoky carne asada? The tender, charred handmade tortilla? The sweet, ripe, spicy brightness of pico de gallo? More likely it's the way all those things come together. You can find such taco greatness at restaurants, corner taquerias and taco trucks with cult followings. But the best tacos in the world might come out of your own kitchen. Imagine a warm corn tortilla filled with thinly sliced, pan-seared duck breast, tomatillo sauce and a cherry-chile compote.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | June 13, 2007
Fatherhood is full of surprises: some pleasant, some not. For me, a pleasing part of being a dad nowadays is fielding questions about food and drink from our twentysomething sons. At this stage of the game, getting any inquiring phone call from your offspring that does not involve the phrases "bail money" or "car trouble" is heartening. It means they think you still might know something. The boys phone their mother if they need an answer about issues involving groceries or baking. But if fire or ice - that is, grilled foods or chilled beverages - is involved, they ring me. And so, I am cheered to take a Saturday-night cell-phone call from a kid reading me the wine labels of the offerings at a grocery store in Alabama, and to steer him toward a zinfandel.
ENTERTAINMENT
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 13, 2006
After years of toiling in big restaurants such as Chevy's in Annapolis and the Tex Mex Grill in the Inner Harbor, business partners Oscar Mendez and Edgar Sorto have opened a little place of their own. This charming little restaurant in the heart of Greektown serves breakfast, lunch and dinner. The service is friendly, the food arrives quickly, the prices are bargain-basement cheap and the setting is unassuming and relaxing. The owners are in the process of obtaining a beer and wine license, they say. The menu at Habanero Grill wanders around the globe, stopping in Peru for ceviche mixto ($9.95)
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | November 7, 2004
If you know anything about fish, you have to wonder why Tim Curci and Chris Parker named the restaurant they opened four years ago in St. Petersburg, Fla., the Bonefish Grill. A bonefish isn't a good eating fish; and even if you don't know anything about fish, it doesn't sound like a fish you'd want to eat. On the other hand, it is kind of hip and intriguing. Salmon Grill just doesn't have the same ring. The name clearly hasn't hurt; in four years Bonefish Grill restaurants have appeared up and down the East Coast.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | September 29, 2004
Philippa Sklaar's Hot Cuisine: Recipes to Excite (NDE Publishing, $24.95, 2003) is not just a cookbook. It's a bodice-ripper. The twice-divorced Los Angeles-based caterer sprinkles her book liberally with romantic adventures and misadventures, starring men with aliases like "Butterscotch," "Tabasco" and "Better Than Chocolate." Think recipe titles like Broccoli Has Its Way With Walnuts; and I Love You, I Want You Walnut Bread. "As my romances came and went, the only steady passion in my life was cooking," Sklaar writes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2011
The good name of Chablis was virtually ruined for a long time by American winemakers who hijacked the name to slap on their cheapest white wines. But there is a real place called Chablis in Burgundy, and it produces chardonnays with a distinctive style — of which this is a sterling example. Spared the heavy-handed influence of new oak, the pure flavors of the fruit and the soil come through crystal clear. There are hints of lemon, orange, green apple, minerals and subtle spices. It's expensive, yes, but this is the real deal, the product of a great vintage and an excellent gift for a devotee of fine dry white wine.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN STAFF | June 12, 1996
When his parents moved back to Greece to retire 24 years ago, Tom Mavrellos realized he couldn't eat in restaurants for the rest of his life.Mavrellos, whose family had immigrated from Athens when he was 17, was cutting hair in a local beauty salon at the time. "I was complaining at the shop about not being able to cook," he explains, "And finally a girl I worked with said, 'Can you read? Then you can cook.' "She wrote down a simple recipe for him: Take a can of mushroom soup, empty it in a saucepan and fill the can with wine.
NEWS
By Mark Graham and Mark Graham,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 28, 2004
It's hard to find a prettier, easier meal than kebabs on the grill: Entree and veggies are cooked together on single-serve skewers. This recipe turns to a fish duo, salmon and grouper, for the main course. The trick to keeping these fish kebabs tender is to turn them frequently while on the grill: You want the fish to be just cooked through and the mushrooms softened. If using bamboo skewers, soak the skewers separately in water for 30 minutes before skewering the fish and vegetables and placing them on the grill.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | March 31, 2002
The Black Olive is a restaurant critic's restaurant. Baltimoreans, though, continue to have mixed feelings about it. Critics rave about the simplicity and sophistication of the grilled fish and Greek specialties. But some people want more luxe surroundings and more elaborate service for what it costs to eat there -- which is, admittedly, a lot. The problem is that until the Black Olive opened five years ago, local diners put Greek food in the cheap eats category. Going to a Greek restaurant where entrees started at $15 (they now start at $22)
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