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By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN FOOD EDITOR | October 6, 1999
Don't let the fall weather put a chill on your grill. With a stove-top pan, you now can turn out juicy, seared meats, fish and vegetables all year long right in your own kitchen.No more dashing outside in the dark with a flashlight to check on dinner. No more standing on the deck with an umbrella while your meal sputters and fizzles. No more trying to coax stubborn briquettes to glow in bone-chilling temperatures.With the twist of a knob, you can heat up a grill pan on the stove and enjoy the charred, caramelized flavors of the outdoors any time.
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By John Houser III, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2012
Watermelon is summer. It's wet, sticky and sweet, but it manages to cool and hydrate during the hot weather. Days spent spitting seeds as children or infusing a melon with vodka for a party as an adult are all part of the summer experience, but what most of us do with watermelon is limited. It's mainly eaten raw, but it can be so much more. Watermelon, which is high in cancer-fighting agent lycopene and vitamins A, B6 and C, is often used as an ingredient in salads, drinks and sorbets, but don't overlook its possibilities on the grill.
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By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | January 17, 2001
If you're a meat lover, you know that a dinner at a steak restaurant is a rare treat. You'll be seduced by steak cuts with a quality that you probably won't see in your supermarket. Prime meat is usually reserved for food service. But what are you to do when you crave a hunk of meat in the comfort of your kitchen? My solution is opt for beef tenderloin. It doesn't have to be prime to be tender. I ask the butcher for 1-inch-thick slices. A balsamic-vinegar marinade and blast of heat are the secrets for getting the best flavor from this meat.
NEWS
By Carole Kotkin and Carole Kotkin,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 19, 2005
Bruschetta is a frugal, homey dish that has found its way onto trendy restaurant menus. But a good bruschetta depends on good ingredients. The bread should be chewy, porous-textured country bread with a crackly crust. The olive oil should be excellent-quality extra-virgin. In addition, the bread slices must be thick enough so they don't dry out completely when toasted or fall apart when rubbed with garlic. Here's the procedure: Cut a loaf of French or Italian country bread into slices about 1/2 -inch thick.
NEWS
By Carole Kotkin and Carole Kotkin,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 19, 2005
Bruschetta is a frugal, homey dish that has found its way onto trendy restaurant menus. But a good bruschetta depends on good ingredients. The bread should be chewy, porous-textured country bread with a crackly crust. The olive oil should be excellent-quality extra-virgin. In addition, the bread slices must be thick enough so they don't dry out completely when toasted or fall apart when rubbed with garlic. Here's the procedure: Cut a loaf of French or Italian country bread into slices about 1/2 -inch thick.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2012
Watermelon is summer. It's wet, sticky and sweet, but it manages to cool and hydrate during the hot weather. Days spent spitting seeds as children or infusing a melon with vodka for a party as an adult are all part of the summer experience, but what most of us do with watermelon is limited. It's mainly eaten raw, but it can be so much more. Watermelon, which is high in cancer-fighting agent lycopene and vitamins A, B6 and C, is often used as an ingredient in salads, drinks and sorbets, but don't overlook its possibilities on the grill.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | July 15, 2007
BLTs, one of America's favorite sandwiches, have always been a passion for me and my family, and over the years I have experimented with various versions of this classic combination. Not so long ago, I had another brainstorm -- the BLT quesadilla! I spread large flour tortillas with creamy goat cheese mixed with some ground cumin, then the classic trinity followed -- sliced tomatoes drizzled with a little balsamic vinegar, bits of bacon and, finally, some baby spinach leaves. After the tortillas were folded in half, they were quickly grilled on a stovetop grill pan. (A skillet will work if you don't own a grill pan.)
NEWS
By Renee Enna and Renee Enna,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 2, 2008
Not everybody has a backyard, a balcony ... or a grill. And even when you do have any or all of that, rain can put the kibosh on outdoor cooking. In these cases, a stove-top grill pan can come to the rescue. These sturdy pans have ridged interiors that approximate outdoor grilling for the indoor cook. There are dozens of pans out there, many crafted from different materials. Our test focused on three: preseasoned cast iron, enamel-coated cast iron and stainless steel. We heated the pans on medium-high heat for 10 minutes before placing two lightly oiled chicken breasts on each.
NEWS
By Bill Daley and Bill Daley,Chicago Tribune | February 27, 2008
Mirin is a sweet, syrupy wine made from rice. It's particularly fine with grilled foods. When brushed over the hot food, the mirin becomes a glossy glaze; think of those skewers of chicken yakitori you get at the local Japanese restaurant. Mirin is low in alcohol and meant for cooking, not drinking. Here, its mild, honeyed flavor enhances the salmon's richness while melding well with the salt of the soy and fish sauces. The sweetness also plays up the smoky char of the grill pan. You can find mirin, fish sauce and soy sauce at Asian and specialty-food markets and, increasingly, in supermarkets.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | December 29, 2004
WHERE THERE IS smoke, there is Steven Raichlen. On a recent Baltimore afternoon, the author of a series of best-selling barbecue books, including The Barbecue! Bible and How to Grill, was sitting in Joy American Cafe on the top floor of the American Visionary Art Museum, where the air, appropriately, was perfumed by the restaurant's wood-burning grill. Raichlen, a native of Baltimore who now splits his time between homes in Coconut Grove, Fla., and Martha's Vineyard, Mass., has set fires around the world.
FEATURES
By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | January 17, 2001
If you're a meat lover, you know that a dinner at a steak restaurant is a rare treat. You'll be seduced by steak cuts with a quality that you probably won't see in your supermarket. Prime meat is usually reserved for food service. But what are you to do when you crave a hunk of meat in the comfort of your kitchen? My solution is opt for beef tenderloin. It doesn't have to be prime to be tender. I ask the butcher for 1-inch-thick slices. A balsamic-vinegar marinade and blast of heat are the secrets for getting the best flavor from this meat.
FEATURES
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN FOOD EDITOR | October 6, 1999
Don't let the fall weather put a chill on your grill. With a stove-top pan, you now can turn out juicy, seared meats, fish and vegetables all year long right in your own kitchen.No more dashing outside in the dark with a flashlight to check on dinner. No more standing on the deck with an umbrella while your meal sputters and fizzles. No more trying to coax stubborn briquettes to glow in bone-chilling temperatures.With the twist of a knob, you can heat up a grill pan on the stove and enjoy the charred, caramelized flavors of the outdoors any time.
FEATURES
By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | July 12, 2000
If you've never made a chicken sandwich from scratch because you don't want to cook more than you need for a two-person household, don't worry. You don't have to roast a whole chicken to get the meat for a delicious chicken sandwich. The equivalent of two chicken breast halves will yield enough chicken for satisfying sandwiches for two. And you don't even have to use bone-in chicken breast meat. You can pick up a package of thinly sliced chicken breast meat that cooks in less than 10 minutes.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | January 23, 2000
Several days ago, while rummaging in my refrigerator for something for my culinary assistant and me to have for a quick bite, I found leftover slices of smoked salmon, a small package of creamy goat cheese and a bunch of partially used dill. On a kitchen counter, there was a loaf of country-style crusty bread in a bread basket. It didn't take me long to figure out that we could make ourselves delectable sandwiches with such enticing ingredients. At first, we were going to assemble open-face sandwiches, but then it dawned on us that grilling them, as Italians do when making their celebrated panini, would be even better.
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