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NEWS
January 31, 2014
Rarely has a column affected me the way Susan Reimer 's empathetic understanding of the Columbia Mall shooter's mother did ( "Equal measures grief and remorse," Jan. 29). Yes, we do blame parents and relatives in similar situations. That's understandable. But were I in the place of Darion Aguilar's mother, Jordan Aguilar, I too might find myself "struggling for a reason to live. " Our culture cherishes privacy, and parents are loath to intrude in their children's cloistered solitude.
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NEWS
January 31, 2014
Rarely has a column affected me the way Susan Reimer 's empathetic understanding of the Columbia Mall shooter's mother did ( "Equal measures grief and remorse," Jan. 29). Yes, we do blame parents and relatives in similar situations. That's understandable. But were I in the place of Darion Aguilar's mother, Jordan Aguilar, I too might find myself "struggling for a reason to live. " Our culture cherishes privacy, and parents are loath to intrude in their children's cloistered solitude.
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NEWS
January 27, 2012
It is a disappointment that the Ravens didn't win last weekend but it's hardly a tragedy. That's why it was tasteless and appalling that The Sun would print an editorial listing Elisabeth Kubler-Ross' five stages of grief in reference to a lost football match ("Stages of grief," Jan. 24). Try asking someone who has lost a loved one to illness, accident or a homicide about grief. Try talking to the families of the deceased in your own news articles and obituaries and see if they can find the humor in comparing their loss to a football game.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | January 29, 2014
In all the reporting of the shootings at The Mall in Columbia, one sentence hit me like a punch in the gut. "His mother right now is struggling for a reason to live," said Ellis Cropper of the woman who raised 19-year-old Darion Marcus Aguilar, who shot two strangers and then himself on Saturday. Struggling for a reason to live. Her son, the younger of her two children, had not only taken his own life - an unbearable tragedy for a mother - he had taken the lives of two other young people.
HEALTH
By Kelly Brewington, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2010
It had been nearly 40 years since Linn Holt lost her mother, but some days, the pain was as unbearable as the day she died. Family gatherings were heartbreaking, Mother's Days were miserable. And on every anniversary of her mother's death, Holt would stay home in bed, hibernating from the world, swelling with grief. It wasn't normal, she thought. She needed help. Three years ago, Holt attended a seminar on Mother's Day weekend for people struggling with the loss of their mothers.
FEATURES
By Catherine Mallette, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2012
If you've lost a pet, sometimes it helps to have a ceremony remembering your furry, scaled or feathered friend. Trust me -- once I had an Episcopal priest and a smattering of friends in my backyard for a full-on, formal memorial service to help me get over the untimely death of Atticus, my beloved tabby. This Sunday, Sept. 9, is the first annual Pet Memorial Sunday Ceremony at Nicodemus Memorial Park at Baltimore Humane Society. The ceremony will feature several speakers, live music and a portrait artist who can create (for a small fee)
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman | mike.klingaman@baltsun.com | April 11, 2010
Former Orioles pitcher Jamie Moyer's effort to blanket America with bereavement camps for children is based on nothing personal. No tragedy in Moyer's own life spurred him to create a nationwide network of support centers for youngsters who are grieving for loved ones - like the camp that is coming to Maryland in July. "Why do this? Why not?" said Moyer, who, at 47, is still pitching for the Philadelphia Phillies. "We all have to deal with death, but when a child has to do it, it's really unfortunate," he said.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2010
When her family was thinking about moving to Texas three years ago, Maggie Mei Lewis, then barely in her teens, so wanted to stay in Maryland that she hatched a seemingly far-fetched plan. "I thought, 'I'll write a book, and I'll make enough money to stay here,' " says Lewis, 16, who lives in Turkey Point. She still hasn't earned enough to be independent, but the result of her labors — "Moonlight Memoirs: Remembering That Family and Friends Are Forever," a richly illustrated children's book — recently took first prize in the spirituality category of the Next Generation Indie Book Awards, a competition for self-published authors around the world.
FEATURES
By Niki Scott and Niki Scott,Universal Press Syndicate | December 8, 1991
It's the season for families to draw together; for faith, celebration and warm memories; for treasured sights and sounds and scents; for time-honored customs and traditions.If you have lost a loved one, these coming weeks can be the loneliest, most painful time of all, says Denise McNaught, founder and executive director of the National Childhood Grief Institute."These holidays will be the worst grieving time you'll ever go through. They'll be so painful, you may not feel as if you can live through them.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2010
You may not see a lot of black armbands or be wearing one yourself. But many of us are in deep mourning — for big stock losses going back to 2008. And our sorrow is so similar to what we feel after a divorce or death in the family that we're likely working through the five stages of grief, says Andrew W. Lo, a finance professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology who has studied investor behavior. The stages for investors are the same as for the grieving: denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance.
NEWS
By Stephen H. Sachs | November 21, 2013
We got the dreadful news of the president's murder at a retirement luncheon at the old House of Welsh for our boss, United States Attorney Joseph Tydings. Stunned and subdued, we straggled back to our fourth floor offices in the nearby United States Post Office and Courthouse. None of us had ever met JFK, but we were unmistakably caught up in the Kennedy call to public service, and we all felt, through Joe, a link to the president. Most of us knew that Joe had been to the White House earlier that week to receive a presidential blessing for his forthcoming campaign for the U.S. Senate.
EXPLORE
September 30, 2013
Highland Presbyterian Church will sponsor a Grief Support Group on Thursday nights this fall to give those who are dealing with grief and loss an opportunity to share with others going through the same thing. The group is intended for those who have lost someone, perhaps recently, and are wondering how to move forward into the future, as well as for those whose loss occurred some months — or even years ago — and who still feel the loss and would welcome an opportunity to talk about it. Experts say it takes a long time to get over significant losses, but that talking with others in the same situation can often be helpful.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | September 27, 2013
The emotional component of the crises that occur in the city all too often winds up in a North Avenue grief counseling room. This destination for some needed healing is little known in the world of Baltimore philanthropic circles. But that will be changing. I spent time this week at Roberta's House, a comfort zone located in the heart of the neighborhoods where these sadnesses often begin. I spoke with Annette March-Grier, who named her project after her late mother, Roberta March, who was known as a loving matriarch among Baltimore's African-American morticians.
FEATURES
September 6, 2013
The Baltimore Humane Society will hold its second annual Pet Memorial Sunday Ceremony on Sept. 8 at Nicodemus Memorial Park on the grounds of the humane society. "For anyone who has experienced the loss of a beloved pet, the sense of grief can be overwhelming, but seldom is there opportunity to mourn and express that grief.  Baltimore Humane Society takes the loss of a pet seriously and is inviting the public to its second annual Pet Memorial Sunday ceremony that will honor and express gratitude to all companion pets that have passed away," the humane society said in a statement.
NEWS
By Judy Fruchter Minkove | August 20, 2013
That old adage is true: There's nothing worse than losing a child. I discovered this a year ago when we laid our beautiful daughter Rachel to rest after a long illness. She was 28. Having lost parents and in-laws, I thought I understood everything about grief. I was wrong. Over the past year, I've learned things about losing a child that have become touchstones. Though I'm still grappling with my new reality, I feel compelled to share some observations that provide a partial answer to thoughtful friends and family who frequently ask: "So, how are you doing?"
ENTERTAINMENT
By Catherine Mallette, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2013
On paper, Lisa Scottoline is a little intimidating. She's got more than 30 million copies in print of her books, including 20 best-selling novels. She writes a weekly column, with her daughter, for The Philadelphia Inquirer. She's a graduate of Harvard University and the University of Pennsylvania Law School, and taught a class at the latter called "Justice and Fiction. " But ask her about any connections she might have to Baltimore, where she'll be visiting May 20 as a featured author in the Baltimore Sun Book Club, and you'll quickly discover her self-deprecating sense of humor.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | June 27, 1995
Nineteen children delighted in long hikes and late-night talks at Camp T.R. last weekend. They made a banner and many new friends. They wrote "Growing Through Grief" books and pulled each other's memories from a heart-shaped box.The children who came to the bereavement camp, sponsored by Carroll Hospice, all knew they couldn't make grief go away, but they hoped to make it more bearable."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | September 28, 1990
"Good Grief" is bad news.The new Fox sitcom, which premieres at 9:30 Sunday night on WBFF-TV (Channel 45), is not very funny, has no consistent focus and is likely to offend gays and lesbians with all its low-rent homosexual humor. That about cover it? Not quite.Like other disappointing Fox pilots this fall, "Good Grief" looked good on paper.It's about a mortuary business run by brothers-in-law. Warren Pepper (Joel Brooks) is the son of the mortuary's original owner. Warren is conservative and traditional.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2013
The mourners followed the coffin of 15-year-old Grace McComas out of the church and into the morning sunlight of a beautiful Easter season. Christine McComas carried her child's stuffed toy in the crook of her arm. Grief made her look almost wistful. As Grace's parents and her three sisters left the crowded St. Michael's Catholic Church in Mount Airy a year ago, they weren't thinking that their journey of grief would take them to Annapolis. But the determination of that grief-stricken mother to tell her daughter's story - powered by a Ravens player, Maryland's first lady and a state legislator - resulted in "Grace's Law," which Gov. Martin O'Malley is scheduled to sign Thursday.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2013
A medic unit that had rushed to the scene of the midday shooting in Belair-Edison sat idling in the street. With the dead man's body under a sheet, there was no one to transport. Word was spreading about 49-year-old Kelvin Moyd's being shot. Relatives came running down Pelham Avenue, visibly upset and too frantic to cry. Two women burst through crime scene tape. One was bear-hugged by a male officer, who had other officers come to his aid as he struggled to keep her back. Then a man came down the street and a group of people swarmed him before he could confront an officer.
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