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NEWS
January 25, 2004
Cumberland, MD - ANTHONY F. GRIEB, 73, of Cumberland, died Friday, January 23, 2004 at his residence, after a long illness. Born September 1, 1930, in Baltimore, he was the son of the late Anthony J. and Elizabeth (Basil) Grieb. Surviving are his wife Edna (Johnson) Grieb; two sons, Jeffery J. Grieb and David F. Grieb; two grandchildren, Alexander and Casey Rose Grieb; four sisters, Elizabeth Ferguson, Marie Blumer and husband William; Eleanor Taafe and husband Joseph, all of Baltimore; and Catherine Stakem and husband Laurence, of Woodbridge, VA.; sisters-in-law Melva Grieb, of Baltimore, and Faye Porter and husband Ronnie, of Cumberland.
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NEWS
June 17, 2008
H. Norman Grieb II, a retired Chestertown Realtor, died Wednesday of complications from Parkinson's disease at Chester River Medical Center. He was 89. Mr. Grieb was born in Eagles Mere, Pa., and raised in St. Davids, Pa. He was a 1936 graduate of William Penn Charter School and attended the University of Virginia. He served in the Coast Guard and Army before being honorably discharged in 1943. Mr. Grieb worked in sales for the Baldwin Electrical Co. and then established Farm Service Co., an electrical and plumbing contracting firm.
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NEWS
December 1, 2007
On November 29, 2007, Doris N. Grieb Friends may call at the family owned Ruck Towson Funeral Home, Inc., 1050 York Road (beltway exit 26), on Sunday from 2:00 to 4:00 and 6:00 to 8:00 PM, where a funeral service will be held on Monday at 11:00 AM. Interment Parkwood Cemetery.
NEWS
December 1, 2007
On November 29, 2007, Doris N. Grieb Friends may call at the family owned Ruck Towson Funeral Home, Inc., 1050 York Road (beltway exit 26), on Sunday from 2:00 to 4:00 and 6:00 to 8:00 PM, where a funeral service will be held on Monday at 11:00 AM. Interment Parkwood Cemetery.
NEWS
June 17, 2008
H. Norman Grieb II, a retired Chestertown Realtor, died Wednesday of complications from Parkinson's disease at Chester River Medical Center. He was 89. Mr. Grieb was born in Eagles Mere, Pa., and raised in St. Davids, Pa. He was a 1936 graduate of William Penn Charter School and attended the University of Virginia. He served in the Coast Guard and Army before being honorably discharged in 1943. Mr. Grieb worked in sales for the Baldwin Electrical Co. and then established Farm Service Co., an electrical and plumbing contracting firm.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2002
The Baltimore Zoo, which is in the middle of an ambitious fund-raising campaign for an overhaul of the 125-year-old institution, is to name attorney Elizabeth "Billie" Grieb as president today. The position is new and will put Grieb in charge of financial management of the zoo. Executive Director Roger Birkel, who has been managing the zoo, will report to Grieb. He said he welcomed the help so he can focus on planning, animal care and the recently begun zoo renovation. Grieb has been a lawyer with Piper Marbury Rudnick & Wolfe LLP for 25 years.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,sun reporter | June 5, 2007
The president of the financially troubled Maryland Zoo in Baltimore announced yesterday that she will step down from her post in December to spend more time with her family. Elizabeth "Billie" Grieb, 56, who has presided over the zoo since 2002, said she decided to quit so she could spend more time with her husband and their five children and four grandchildren. She said family considerations were the only reason she planned to leave the job. In a brief interview yesterday, Grieb said she feels confident of the zoo's future - noting recent increases in state and city aid that have helped place the zoo on the path toward steadier financial footing.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,Sun Reporter | December 7, 2006
Financial problems confronting the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore are continuing to grow, the zoo's top official told the Board of Public Works yesterday. The zoo, which is subsidized by the state, lost $3 million during the fiscal year that ended June 30, said Billie Grieb, the Zoo's president and chief executive. She said she expects losses to top that this year because the zoo's funding hasn't changed even though expenses have increased. Grieb and officials from the Sports Legends at Camden Yards museum and Geppi's Entertainment Museum - both at Camden Station near Oriole Park - talked at the meeting about different ideas for marketing their attractions to draw more tourists.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | February 3, 2004
Anna and Dolly - the Baltimore's Zoo's beloved elephants - are sending out valentines this year in hopes that people will open their hearts and their wallets with $285,000 needed by Valentine's Day to help the zoo reach its $1 million fund-raising goal and to obtain a $1 million matching grant. The zoo has received $715,000 from individuals and businesses since announcing in November that it was laying off 20 workers, reducing its collection by 400 animals and shipping Dolly and Anna to another zoo on a "breeding loan."
NEWS
By a Sun Staff Writer | March 4, 2007
The weather was made to order, lines were long, admission was free and a whiff of freshly grilled food was inviting. But it was the polar bears that had people talking yesterday at the inauguration of The Maryland Zoo in Baltimore's 2007 season. "What are they doing?" asked 5-year-old Johnny Davis of Frederick. "They're wrestling," his mother, Carol, answered before hurrying him off to another exhibit. It wasn't long before zoo officials posted signs: "Polar Bear Mating Season." But Elizabeth Grieb, president of the zoo, took it all in stride.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,sun reporter | June 5, 2007
The president of the financially troubled Maryland Zoo in Baltimore announced yesterday that she will step down from her post in December to spend more time with her family. Elizabeth "Billie" Grieb, 56, who has presided over the zoo since 2002, said she decided to quit so she could spend more time with her husband and their five children and four grandchildren. She said family considerations were the only reason she planned to leave the job. In a brief interview yesterday, Grieb said she feels confident of the zoo's future - noting recent increases in state and city aid that have helped place the zoo on the path toward steadier financial footing.
NEWS
By a Sun Staff Writer | March 4, 2007
The weather was made to order, lines were long, admission was free and a whiff of freshly grilled food was inviting. But it was the polar bears that had people talking yesterday at the inauguration of The Maryland Zoo in Baltimore's 2007 season. "What are they doing?" asked 5-year-old Johnny Davis of Frederick. "They're wrestling," his mother, Carol, answered before hurrying him off to another exhibit. It wasn't long before zoo officials posted signs: "Polar Bear Mating Season." But Elizabeth Grieb, president of the zoo, took it all in stride.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,Sun Reporter | December 7, 2006
Financial problems confronting the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore are continuing to grow, the zoo's top official told the Board of Public Works yesterday. The zoo, which is subsidized by the state, lost $3 million during the fiscal year that ended June 30, said Billie Grieb, the Zoo's president and chief executive. She said she expects losses to top that this year because the zoo's funding hasn't changed even though expenses have increased. Grieb and officials from the Sports Legends at Camden Yards museum and Geppi's Entertainment Museum - both at Camden Station near Oriole Park - talked at the meeting about different ideas for marketing their attractions to draw more tourists.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | February 3, 2004
Anna and Dolly - the Baltimore's Zoo's beloved elephants - are sending out valentines this year in hopes that people will open their hearts and their wallets with $285,000 needed by Valentine's Day to help the zoo reach its $1 million fund-raising goal and to obtain a $1 million matching grant. The zoo has received $715,000 from individuals and businesses since announcing in November that it was laying off 20 workers, reducing its collection by 400 animals and shipping Dolly and Anna to another zoo on a "breeding loan."
NEWS
January 25, 2004
Cumberland, MD - ANTHONY F. GRIEB, 73, of Cumberland, died Friday, January 23, 2004 at his residence, after a long illness. Born September 1, 1930, in Baltimore, he was the son of the late Anthony J. and Elizabeth (Basil) Grieb. Surviving are his wife Edna (Johnson) Grieb; two sons, Jeffery J. Grieb and David F. Grieb; two grandchildren, Alexander and Casey Rose Grieb; four sisters, Elizabeth Ferguson, Marie Blumer and husband William; Eleanor Taafe and husband Joseph, all of Baltimore; and Catherine Stakem and husband Laurence, of Woodbridge, VA.; sisters-in-law Melva Grieb, of Baltimore, and Faye Porter and husband Ronnie, of Cumberland.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | November 26, 2003
With an outpouring of public support to keep elephants Dolly and Anna at the Baltimore Zoo, business leaders have pledged to match up to $1 million in donations if Maryland citizens can raise that much by Valentine's Day, the zoo announced yesterday. Zoo President Elizabeth "Billie" Grieb said Maryland residents have donated $300,000 to the zoo since it was publicized early this month that the attraction needed to lend its elephants to other zoos and lay off workers to help cover a budget shortfall.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | November 26, 2003
With an outpouring of public support to keep elephants Dolly and Anna at the Baltimore Zoo, business leaders have pledged to match up to $1 million in donations if Maryland citizens can raise that much by Valentine's Day, the zoo announced yesterday. Zoo President Elizabeth "Billie" Grieb said Maryland residents have donated $300,000 to the zoo since it was publicized early this month that the attraction needed to lend its elephants to other zoos and lay off workers to help cover a budget shortfall.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | November 6, 2003
Across the Baltimore region yesterday, people had the same idea: help the Baltimore Zoo out of its financial crisis and save two elephants who may be sent into exile because they are too expensive to care for. Some called in a total of $10,000 in donations. A radio station, a cable channel, a number of zoo members and even middle school classes all offered to help raise more cash. An administrative assistant at the zoo's hospital resigned and said she would do her job for free. They were reacting to the announcement Tuesday that the Baltimore Zoo had laid off 20 people and would be reducing its collection by about 400 animals.
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