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NEWS
February 6, 2013
No Labels is a non-partisan group of concerned citizens from left, right, and center. The "No Budget, No Pay" concept is a central tenet ("Missed opportunity," Jan 25). Congress is required to produce a budget. All we are asking is that they take no pay until they do their job each and every year. Another idea is to seat members of Congress without regard to party affiliation rather than have Democrats across the aisle from Republicans. This will encourage discussion and compromise.
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SPORTS
June 8, 2014
Problems in the Department of Veterans Affairs' medical system have been years in the making, and it's shameful that it took a scandal like the one now engulfing the department to prompt Congress to act. But the bi-partisan deal announced Thursday by Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders and Arizona Sen. John McCain appears to be a solid effort to put veterans' needs, not politics, at the forefront of the national response to the debacle. Inspectors general have found thousands of instances of veterans who had to endure long waits for care and cases in which VA officials sought to cover up the delays through secret wait-lists and other means.
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NEWS
October 4, 2013
As a senior in high school, it is very disappointing to see how our leaders in Washington are not doing their jobs ( "Congress: Do your job," Oct. 3). In school, the value of working together is taught, and my family has stressed cooperation to get problems addressed. But in Washington they appear to feel that the more they act like spoiled brats the better they are doing their job. I have a 4-year-old sister, and even she does not have temper tantrums like the politicians in Washington do. They appear to feel that if they cannot have it their way they will ruin things for everyone.
NEWS
December 21, 2013
The Sun writes that those nasty old Republicans are up to no good once again ( "Not another debt limit fight," Dec. 16). Instead of cheerfully following the game plan and increasing the national debt by several trillion dollars, Republicans actually want to do something to slow this free fall into bankruptcy. Our national debt is over $17 trillion and, according to The Sun, another trillion or two here or there can't hurt anybody, right? But complaining about Republican partisanship conveniently obscures the Democrats' irresponsibility.
NEWS
December 11, 2012
The problems we face were foreseen for decades. For decades, Congress has let foreseeable problems grow until they reached a crisis point. They left no time for reasonable debate. Instead of outlining the facts and the options, they endlessly repeat the same futile rhetorical points. They claim to be reasonable, while each accuses the other, accurately, of being intractably ideological. Meanwhile, they work for the lobbyists who support their campaigns more than they do for their constituents.
NEWS
December 21, 2013
The Sun writes that those nasty old Republicans are up to no good once again ( "Not another debt limit fight," Dec. 16). Instead of cheerfully following the game plan and increasing the national debt by several trillion dollars, Republicans actually want to do something to slow this free fall into bankruptcy. Our national debt is over $17 trillion and, according to The Sun, another trillion or two here or there can't hurt anybody, right? But complaining about Republican partisanship conveniently obscures the Democrats' irresponsibility.
NEWS
January 5, 1991
Howard County, among the most vocal opponents of statewide growth controls, continues to make the best case for uniformity. Back in October, a stymied county council passed the job of coming up with a workable adequate facilities ordinance onto the newly sworn-in council members. The incentive for the new council to do something is an unpopular cap on building permits that remains in place until the council comes up with a plan forcing builders to help shoulder infrastructure costs in areas plagued by overcrowded schools and traffic gridlock.
NEWS
July 18, 1993
Ross Perot's Western tour began last weekend with a visit to Mount Rushmore. Could this mean he is thinking of running for president again? Some people think so. Unlike previous third party candidates for president, he remains popular eight months after losing the election. Polls now show him with about as much voter support as he won at the polls last year. That is in the 19-20 percent range, which was the most for a third party candidate since Theodore Roosevelt, a Rushmorian, ran as an ex-president in 1912.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | August 6, 2002
CHICAGO - Gridlock is that phenomenon, much dreaded by Washington insiders and commentators, in which partisan bickering and gamesmanship prevent bold legislative action. But it's not necessarily something to dread. It often serves to block shameless pandering and force sober reflection. Last week, it also turned out to be the taxpayer's best friend. The two parties have been quarreling for months over how to furnish prescription drug coverage to Medicare recipients, something no one is much inclined to oppose.
NEWS
By Joseph Ganem | September 24, 2013
This past Wednesday I received an email from my professional organization - the American Physical Society - with the subject line: "Urgent Helium Alert. " The message called on me to contact Congress immediately to urge them to act on helium legislation so that the U. S. Bureau of Land Management can continue operations beyond September 30. According to the email: "Partisan gridlock threatens to diminish the US Helium supply by 50% on October 1st. " As I looked at the list of Congressional names and phone numbers provided, I tried to imagine what I would say to a staffer who might only think of helium as the element that keeps balloons and blimps afloat.
NEWS
October 4, 2013
As a senior in high school, it is very disappointing to see how our leaders in Washington are not doing their jobs ( "Congress: Do your job," Oct. 3). In school, the value of working together is taught, and my family has stressed cooperation to get problems addressed. But in Washington they appear to feel that the more they act like spoiled brats the better they are doing their job. I have a 4-year-old sister, and even she does not have temper tantrums like the politicians in Washington do. They appear to feel that if they cannot have it their way they will ruin things for everyone.
NEWS
By Joseph Ganem | September 24, 2013
This past Wednesday I received an email from my professional organization - the American Physical Society - with the subject line: "Urgent Helium Alert. " The message called on me to contact Congress immediately to urge them to act on helium legislation so that the U. S. Bureau of Land Management can continue operations beyond September 30. According to the email: "Partisan gridlock threatens to diminish the US Helium supply by 50% on October 1st. " As I looked at the list of Congressional names and phone numbers provided, I tried to imagine what I would say to a staffer who might only think of helium as the element that keeps balloons and blimps afloat.
NEWS
February 20, 2013
February can be the cruelest month. In the midst of the cold, gray winter bleakness, it's tempting to daydream of a simpler life without hard work, heavy lifting or personal sacrifice, where nobody ever has to pay more in taxes yet all necessities of modern transportation — from airport runways and port dredging to eight-lane highways and bus lines — are magically provided. In other words, how easy it would be right now to be a Maryland state senator or delegate opposed to raising the state's gas tax from 1992 levels.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2013
A blizzard was expected to dump a couple of feet of snow across New England through midday today, and while Baltimore was largely spared, the storm delivered some wintry precipitation and headaches for travelers. At Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport, dozens of flights to and from the Northeast were canceled, leaving some travelers scrambling to brave snowy roads in rental cars. Others landed there Friday from points north, escaping ahead of the expected 2 feet of snow, only to find limited options for getting anywhere else.
NEWS
February 6, 2013
No Labels is a non-partisan group of concerned citizens from left, right, and center. The "No Budget, No Pay" concept is a central tenet ("Missed opportunity," Jan 25). Congress is required to produce a budget. All we are asking is that they take no pay until they do their job each and every year. Another idea is to seat members of Congress without regard to party affiliation rather than have Democrats across the aisle from Republicans. This will encourage discussion and compromise.
NEWS
January 3, 2013
Here's a question for you Maryland taxpayers out there: Would you rather pay a higher tax on many items you purchase each day or on something you may buy perhaps once a week (a commodity that's actually decreased in price nearly 20 percent in recent months, by the way)? Surely, most people would choose the latter. But there's another way to look at it: Would you rather see the Maryland sales tax rise after enduring a similar increase a mere five years ago, or see the gas tax rise after a 20-year freeze?
NEWS
By J.H. Snider | April 12, 2001
WASHINGTON - The National Governors Association reported recently that the annual cost to society of traffic gridlock is $72 billion in wasted time and fuel as well as 4.3 billion hours stuck in traffic. And gridlock is getting worse. Politicians know that traffic gridlock is unpopular and that the public expects them to alleviate it. They also know that people only want traffic efficiency - like garbage dumps, power plants, and cell-phone towers - in someone else's back yard. The National Governors Association report, subtitled "Delivering More Transportation Choices to Break Gridlock," reflects this political calculus.
BUSINESS
By Kevin G. Hall and Kevin G. Hall,McClatchy-Tribune | November 9, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Wall Street and business leaders welcome the Democrats' capture of power in Congress as a formula for gridlock that should lead to lower government spending and no significant change in tax law. That's not to say that the Democrats' victory won't have any economic impact. It jeopardizes several trade deals that President Bush has negotiated but Congress hasn't passed. It may well mean an increase in the federal minimum wage. And it's sure to mean tougher scrutiny of Big Oil, and perhaps the first regulation of hedge funds, the investment pools favored by the very wealthy.
NEWS
December 11, 2012
The problems we face were foreseen for decades. For decades, Congress has let foreseeable problems grow until they reached a crisis point. They left no time for reasonable debate. Instead of outlining the facts and the options, they endlessly repeat the same futile rhetorical points. They claim to be reasonable, while each accuses the other, accurately, of being intractably ideological. Meanwhile, they work for the lobbyists who support their campaigns more than they do for their constituents.
NEWS
By David Horsey | September 25, 2012
Presidents get the praise or blame for everything that happens on their watch, but, as Barack Obama has learned, the things the commander-in-chief can actually command are limited in number, thanks to James Madison and Newt Gingrich. Madison and his brilliant colleagues who invented the American system of government disagreed about many things, but they fervently agreed about one big thing: The coercive power of government needed to be held in check. They accomplished this by spreading the power around between the executive, legislative and judicial branches of government.
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