Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGrid
IN THE NEWS

Grid

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 30, 2010
The Baltimore Building and Construction Trades Council and its members know all too well the importance of an adequate infrastructure to the stability of our economy. Our well-trained and skilled membership work on water, sewer and road projects; we also work on all types of industrial projects. We see every day why not only our area, but the nation needs to have a strong, reliable infrastructure. Many times our elected officials use water, roads and sewer projects as a political platform to get elected; these projects are supported by us citizens and rightly so. But there is one vital part of the infrastructure that goes unnoticed and taken for granted — our electrical transmission grid system.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2014
The state's utility regulators are asking Marylanders to conserve energy as demand caused by the cold snap puts extra pressure on the region's power grid. Higher electricity use means the regional grid operator "is managing a very tight power supply, especially in the BGE and Pepco regions," the Maryland Public Service Commission said in a statement Thursday. Officials also urged customers to conserve power during the earlier run of freezing temperatures this month. Conservation is most needed weekdays from 6 a.m. to 9 a.m. and again from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m., the Public Service Commission said.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 17, 2010
In the "Baltimore's energy IQ" editorial (Aug. 17), you touted the savings Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.'s smart meters will bring and the development of a smart energy grid. A truly smart meter, however, would encourage BGE customers to generate renewable energy at home and feed back into the grid any excess not used at home. BGE may not think it is "smart" to encourage customers to lower their electricity bills by capturing renewable energy at home. Francis J. Gorman, Baltimore
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2013
Federal regulators investigating Exelon's Constellation commodities group say they have "preliminarily determined" that the division violated market-behavior rules. The brief notice, filed Friday by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, said only that the alleged violations involve not providing accurate information to a power grid operator, the California Independent System Operator. FERC declined to comment. Constellation, the Baltimore energy company bought by Chicago-based Exelon last year, downplayed the investigation.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Columnist | August 8, 2007
Don't do it, Mid-Atlantic states. Don't accept the electric grid's offer to settle your complaint. Don't let the dirty secrets that have begun to emerge get covered up. Expose possible abuses found by an internal watchdog at PJM Interconnection, the regional grid manager. Identify the generation company he said reaped $20 million in "excess payments" over two weeks. Find out who might be getting away with similar shenanigans. Here in Central Maryland we just got a 72 percent electric-price pop. We want as clear a view of our deregulated electricity market as Californians got of theirs after the Enron debacle, and this case looks like it'll help.
NEWS
April 23, 2007
Jay Hancock's column "Rigging electricity?" (April 18) levels unfounded criticisms at PJM Interconnection for its efforts to ensure the reliability of the electric grid that serves the District of Columbia, Maryland and 12 other states. The column decries the "capacity charge" as "pure profit" for power generators. In reality, it's a fee to cover the expenses of maintaining uneconomic generators that are needed to maintain the grid's reliability in times of high demand but otherwise would be shut down.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | October 21, 2001
Fear that the nightmare scenario of spiking electricity prices, debt-ridden utilities and rolling blackouts that roiled California could afflict the Northeast, including Maryland, is prompting state regulators to dig in their heels against a federal order to merge three power grids into one super network. The Maryland Public Service Commission is threatening to sue the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission because the massive effort to transform the electric grid is moving ahead without careful examination and cost benefit analysis, and largely without public scrutiny, the PSC says.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Chris Emery and Frank D. Roylance and Chris Emery,SUN REPORTERS | August 9, 2007
Temperatures soared to 105 degrees in downtown Baltimore yesterday, turning up the burner on what was already the worst heat wave of the summer and forcing a brownout on the region's power grid. The high of 102 at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport scorched the previous record of 99 degrees for an Aug. 8, set in 1980. It was the hottest day at the airport in more than eight years. Downtown, heat index readings rose to about 120 degrees. There were no immediate reports of deaths in Maryland linked to this latest siege of hot weather.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | July 16, 2004
The operator of the power grid that serves Maryland and seven other states said yesterday that it has given the go-ahead for $87 million in upgrades to the electric transmission system to ensure reliable electric service for the region's 35 million customers. PJM Interconnection, an independent system operator that monitors high-voltage transmission lines in the region, said it approved the upgrades - to be made either by utilities or power plant developers - as part of a continuing process to improve the grid.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2014
The state's utility regulators are asking Marylanders to conserve energy as demand caused by the cold snap puts extra pressure on the region's power grid. Higher electricity use means the regional grid operator "is managing a very tight power supply, especially in the BGE and Pepco regions," the Maryland Public Service Commission said in a statement Thursday. Officials also urged customers to conserve power during the earlier run of freezing temperatures this month. Conservation is most needed weekdays from 6 a.m. to 9 a.m. and again from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m., the Public Service Commission said.
NEWS
By Roger Berliner | July 30, 2013
For those of us in Maryland who have suffered from unacceptable electric utility service - and that is most of us - there is light at the end of the tunnel. Utility executives, think tanks and energy experts all agree: There is a utility revolution coming. It is a revolution that has been created by the innovative might of technology that is more powerful, superior and totally antithetical to the existing antiquated utility system. We call it Utility 2.0. It literally turns the existing utility paradigm on its head.
NEWS
May 20, 2013
Baltimore Gas & Electric certainly isn't likely to win any popularity contests. It secured a rate increase from the Public Service Commission in February - its second in the last three years - and turned around and filed a request for another one on Friday. And at the same time, the utility is asking the PSC for what may be unprecedented in Maryland: a surcharge on customers' monthly bills to pay for improvements to the electrical grid in advance. But as little as we may like it, the truth is that failing to make investments in maintaining the grid and improving its reliability is costing us dearly, too. It's just a harder cost to figure than the one that shows up at the bottom of our electric bills every month.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2013
Fifty-eight years after it opened in Highland, Boarman's Old-Fashioned Meat Market is still, in many respects, living up to its name. Boarman family members still mix spices for the pork sausage made in house, the staff butcher still stuffs the sausage skin, still cuts meat to order and, more recently, started smoking bacon with apple wood he gets from a neighbor. Boarman's is possibly Howard County's last all-purpose market that's not part of a chain, offering everything from household cleaners to beer and wine, canned goods, produce, house-made crab cakes and custom cuts of meat.
NEWS
November 26, 2012
Approximately 200,000 people in Maryland were left without power in wake of hurricane Sandy on Oct. 30 2012. Three days later only 700 houses were still left without power. Jeannette M. Mills at Baltimore Gas and Electricity observed that the quick restoration was partially made possible by smart meters and smart grid, made of two-way communications systems, smart meters and sensors, similar to shift from analog to digital system in cable services. Smart meters pinpoint precise locations of meters to electricity service sources through digital communication, thus saving time, dollars and wasteful service rounds to locations where power has been already restored.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2012
Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. customers could see a $1 to $2 fee added to their monthly bills under a proposal from Gov. Martin O'Malley to make the electricity grid more reliable. A task force the O'Malley administration assembled after the June 29 derecho recommended Wednesday that regulators push utilities to make even more upgrades to the grid more quickly than previously planned, and to tap customers to pay for them as needed. The derecho caused 762,000 outages, some lasting as long as eight days, in the Baltimore area.
NEWS
October 3, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley's proposal to force Maryland utilities to harden their systems against the kind of damage we saw in the summer's derecho storm raised immediate concerns among consumer advocates. The reason: It could add a dollar or two a month to residential customers' bills to compensate utilities for trimming trees, burying power lines and other activities that advocates say companies like Baltimore Gas & Electric and Pepco ought to be doing anyway. The criticism is particularly pointed in the case of Pepco, which was fined $1 million last year by the Public Service Commission for failing to invest sufficiently in that kind of grid maintenance.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | November 27, 2003
WASHINGTON -American Electric Power Co. should join the PJM Interconnection, the grid operator for the Mid-Atlantic states, federal regulators said yesterday in a preliminary order asserting authority to exempt the company from state rules. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission said the third-largest U.S. utility by sales must meet a previous commitment to put most of its transmission facilities under PJM's control. Regulators in Virginia and Kentucky have been hindering the move on concern that cheap power might be drained from their states.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay and Hanah Cho and Liz F. Kay and Hanah Cho,liz.kay@baltsun.com and Hanah.Cho@baltsun.com | November 11, 2009
A proposal to modernize the electricity grid by coupling "smart" meters with a new pricing system for the hottest summer afternoons will lower operational costs, create incentives to reduce demand and benefit the environment, a Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. executive told state regulators Tuesday. "This is an exciting juncture for BGE customers," said Mark D. Case, BGE's senior vice president for regulatory affairs, as he described the company's "smart grid" proposal before the Maryland Public Service Commission.
NEWS
September 17, 2012
After two massive, widespread, multi-day power outages in less than a year and thousands of complaints from angry customers left in the dark, literally and figuratively, it can now safely be said that Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. gets it. Company officials testified before the Public Service Commission last week that they are strategically hardening the system and asking the big questions about what it would take to redesign the entire grid to promote...
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley's administration launched an effort Tuesday to limit the extended power outages that have troubled Marylanders in recent months, but industry experts warned that any solution could require significant costs and trade-offs. Montgomery County Councilman Roger Berliner said it was an outrage that reliability in Maryland doesn't match that of some countries, where a year's worth of outages are measured in a matter of minutes. "Power outages have become the No. 1 threat to our quality of life," said Berliner, a member of a new gubernatorial task force on electricity reliability.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.