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NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Staff Writer | January 17, 1993
Bill Clinton may be the best friend a bus ever had.When the president-elect boards a motor coach in Virginia for his entrance into Washington today, it will be a moment in the spotlight for an industry that has long felt a bit shortchanged when it comes to respect.Actually, it will be more like a curtain call. Representatives of the bus industry are already plenty proud that Mr. Clinton showcased the merits of bus travel last year by using them as the dominant vehicles of his presidential campaign.
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NEWS
By Gregory Spencer Jr | February 1, 2012
The corner of Howard and Lombard streets has the potential to be the pulse point of a healthier city and region. This is where the proposed Red Line and the existing Light Rail line will directly connect, addressing two long-standing deficiencies with mass transit in this city: the lack of an east/west rapid transit line and the absence of a direct transfer between rail lines to create a true "system. " Baltimore and Maryland should consider taking this transfer point one step further.
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NEWS
By Gregory Spencer Jr | February 1, 2012
The corner of Howard and Lombard streets has the potential to be the pulse point of a healthier city and region. This is where the proposed Red Line and the existing Light Rail line will directly connect, addressing two long-standing deficiencies with mass transit in this city: the lack of an east/west rapid transit line and the absence of a direct transfer between rail lines to create a true "system. " Baltimore and Maryland should consider taking this transfer point one step further.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Staff Writer | January 17, 1993
Bill Clinton may be the best friend a bus ever had.When the president-elect boards a motor coach in Virginia for his entrance into Washington today, it will be a moment in the spotlight for an industry that has long felt a bit shortchanged when it comes to respect.Actually, it will be more like a curtain call. Representatives of the bus industry are already plenty proud that Mr. Clinton showcased the merits of bus travel last year by using them as the dominant vehicles of his presidential campaign.
BUSINESS
October 11, 1991
A U.S. bankruptcy judge in Dallas yesterday signed an order confirming the reorganization of Greyhound Lines Inc., formally ending the Chapter 11 saga that began after the bus company's drivers went on strike last year."
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | July 31, 1992
From Crabtown to the Big Apple for $6.95.For about the price of lunch at a fast-food restaurant along the New Jersey Turnpike, travelers can board a Peter Pan Trailways bus at an East Baltimore depot for the 3 1/2 -hour trek to New York.The new discount fare, which a Peter Pan spokesman, Michael Paton, said is designed to introduce the bus company's service to the Baltimore area, is lower than the carrier had originally intended.In a press release faxed from its headquarters in Springfield, Mass.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | September 1, 1998
Greyhound Lines has joined Amtrak to explore the physical and economic feasibility of constructing in Baltimore the latest form of urban transit center -- an "intermodal terminal" that would bring together five kinds of transportation in one location.Architects hired by Greyhound and Amtrak showed Baltimore's Design Advisory Panel conceptual plans last week for an $8 million to $10 million bus terminal and garage that would be constructed on a triangular lot north of Pennsylvania Station.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Legg MasonStaff Writer | November 24, 1992
Investors who bought the dozen stocks on Legg Mason Inc.'s annual "Thanksgiving List" last year had a lot to be thankful for -- namely, an 18.2 percent return on their investment as of last week, compared with the 15.2 percent return of the S&P 500.But more thankful were Legg Mason's clients. They would have FTC earned a 23.5 percent return if they'd followed the firm's changes to its "Turkey List," as it is fondly known in some investment circles.Legg decided not to dance with the companies it came with last year, at least not all of them.
NEWS
January 18, 1999
Arthur C. Fatt, 94, one of the founders of Grey Advertising and a former chief executive of the company, died Tuesday at his winter home in Delray Beach, Fla.With Lawrence Valenstein, he started Grey in 1925 with a handful of employees in New York. When they retired, Grey had become one of the nation's leading advertising agencies.Among the accounts that he brought to the company were Ford Motor Co., Procter & Gamble and Chock Full o' Nuts. He wrote the well-known line for the Greyhound Lines bus company, "Leave the driving to us."
BUSINESS
April 21, 1993
Housing starts fell 4.6% in MarchU.S. housing starts declined 4.6 percent in March, to a seasonally adjusted rate of 1.134 million units, and were down 26.8 percent in the Northeast.The weakness reported yesterday was mostly weather-related, analysts said, adding that current low mortgage rates bode well for a rebound in coming months.CBOT withdraws merger offerThe Chicago Board of Trade withdrew its offer to merge with the Commodity Exchange yesterday, the CBOT said in a release.The CBOT announced its bid for Comex Jan. 25, saying such a merger could help the two exchanges cut costs.
BUSINESS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | April 9, 2004
WASHINGTON - The Senate voted 78-19 yesterday to send President Bush pension legislation that supporters say will save businesses $80 billion in excess fund payments over the next two years. Bush is expected to sign the bill before next Thursday, the deadline on which many businesses offering traditional pensions - called defined-benefit plans - would have been required to start making unnecessary extra payments under an obsolete funding formula. The old formula was based on 30-year Treasury bonds, which no longer are issued.
NEWS
January 16, 2003
GREYHOUND LINES, which handles more than 1 million Baltimore passengers a year, should have a centrally located bus terminal. This much is clear. But more than a year after Mayor Martin O'Malley's last-minute about-face killed the carrier's advanced plans for a new terminal next to Amtrak's Penn Station, Greyhound is in a quandary. With redevelopment closing in, it is likely to be evicted from Fayette Street by the end of the year. Temporarily, the bus line can retreat to its secondary hub at East Baltimore's Travel Plaza.
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