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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 26, 2001
The Muse in Exile: Emigres and Divas series continues Thursday with Ninotchka, a 1939 romance named for a lovely Bolshevik in Paris played by Greta Garbo. The picture weds the understated virtuosity of Ernst Lubitsch's direction to the unabashed wisecracking of a script by Billy Wilder, Charles Brackett and Walter Reisch. The movie is full of cynical jokes in what became the established Wilder manner: Ninotchka defends Stalin's purges with the declaration, "There are going to be fewer but better Russians!"
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NEWS
June 1, 2006
Robert Sterling, 88, the handsome star of 1940s movies who appeared with his wife, Anne Jeffreys, in the popular television series Topper, died Tuesday at his Los Angeles home Mr. Sterling died of natural causes after a decade-long battle with shingles, said his son, Jeffrey. Mr. Sterling's wife and other close relatives were at his bedside. Although he appeared in dozens of movies, Mr. Sterling was best known for the 1953-1956 television series based on the Thorne Smith novel, and the 1937 film starring Cary Grant and Constance Bennett.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2003
Art Starting tonight, photographers Christopher Myers and Alexey Titarenko team up to present highly subjective views of the former Soviet Union at C. Grimaldis Gallery. In Images From Russia, Baltimore native Myers explores the old-world quietude of St. Petersburg and the influence of the West on the traditional Russian culture of Moscow. Titarenko's Black and White Magic of St. Petersburg probes the elusive subconscious of his native city in pictures that re-create the private spaces of individual experience.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 28, 2003
Many writers have soared into reverie for Greta Garbo - most famously Kenneth Tynan when he wrote, "What when drunk one sees in other women, one sees in Garbo sober." But too often that mode of praise feeds into her mystique without crediting her amazing skill. Tonight at 7:30, as part of Vivat!, the Walters Arts Museum, the Maryland Film Festival and the Johns Hopkins Film and Media Studies program will present the 1927 silent romance Love, featuring Garbo's incandescent first performance in the role of Anna Karenina (she did the more famous sound version in 1935)
NEWS
June 5, 2000
Matilda "Babe" Bitzenburger, 86, a national champion archer who taught movie stars such as Vivien Leigh and Tony Curtis, died Sunday in Oregon. She was 96. Mrs. Bitzenburger, known as the Annie Oakley of the bow and arrow, appeared in newsreels and television shows in the 1940s, '50s and early '60s dressed in movie-star cowgirl regalia. In 1929, she married Henry A. Bitzenburger, who was a competition archer. She soon picked up a bow and turned out to be a natural. She sold the beauty salon she owned to devote more time to the sport and began entering competitions.
NEWS
June 1, 2006
Robert Sterling, 88, the handsome star of 1940s movies who appeared with his wife, Anne Jeffreys, in the popular television series Topper, died Tuesday at his Los Angeles home Mr. Sterling died of natural causes after a decade-long battle with shingles, said his son, Jeffrey. Mr. Sterling's wife and other close relatives were at his bedside. Although he appeared in dozens of movies, Mr. Sterling was best known for the 1953-1956 television series based on the Thorne Smith novel, and the 1937 film starring Cary Grant and Constance Bennett.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | March 14, 1991
"GRAND HOTEL," the musical in its last weekend at th Morris A. Mechanic Theatre, is remarkably faithful to the 1932 film on which it is based.The film version, a classic, was the blockbuster of its day. It was big in every way -- in story and production -- and above all, it had star power.Greta Garbo, John Barrymore, Joan Crawford, Wallace Beery, Lionel Barrymore, Lewis Stone and Jean Hersholt were in the cast. John Barrymore almost didn't make it. Garbo, still hoping to salvage the career of her ex-lover, John Gilbert,When the film opened in Baltimore at the Auditorium (later, the Mayfair)
NEWS
By Joan Whitson Wallace | November 4, 1990
The wind whipped against my skirt as I hurried to the restaurant. This week had been grueling.I craved the peacefulness of a solitary lunch. I could relate to Greta Garbo's famous line, "I want to be alone." Perhaps that's why I ordered the Greta Garbo sandwich ($3.75) from the menu.Or perhaps I ordered it because it sounded so enticing: chicken salad, bacon, Swiss cheese, lettuce, tomato and mayo. I specified pumpernickel bread.The day was so brisk I had to have something warm, like soup.
NEWS
By Russell Baker | September 19, 1990
YOU ARE in a movie house on the edge of your seat because the Indestructible Thing from Ghastly Galaxy is sneaking up on Arnold Schwarzenegger with a spray gun carrying liquefied muscle-shrinking gas, one drop of which can reduce a weightlifter to a 97-pound weakling faster than you can say Schwarzenegger.Suddenly the telephone rings in the next seat. "Hello, this is Jason," says your fellow moviegoer, then, "Jennifer! You got me at the movies, Jen . . ."No, not Stallone. It's Schwarzenegger, but the special effects aren't so hot. Just that old thing with a guy's brain being squeezed out through his eye sockets.
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By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | March 7, 1991
If you want your children to be the first on the block to see ''Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles II: The Secret of the Ooze,'' tell the kids to save their money ($5) and get to the Yorkridge Cinemas on Saturday, March 16, at 10 a.m.Proceeds from the showing will go to The Children's House at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The kids will not only get to see the film, they will also be presented with a ''bag of goodies,'' whatever that means.If you want more information on the screening, call The Grant-A-Wish Foundation at 242-1549.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 21, 2003
Movie fans who can't wait for Baltimore's spring festival season can get a jump on things this weekend, as the first Annapolis Reel Cinema Festival gets cranking in the state capital. Featuring mostly the works of young, aspiring and often local filmmakers, the festival includes a few surprise bonuses as well, including tonight's kick-off presentation, Morvern Callar. The Scottish film, from writer-director Lynne Ramsay, stars Samantha Morton (Sweet and Lowdown, Minority Report) as Morvern, a supermarket clerk who sets out for Ibiza after her boyfriend commits suicide, taking with her his unpublished novel, which she passes off as her own. Noi Mahoney, a business reporter for the Annapolis Capital who organized this year's festival, said he heard about the film from a friend living overseas and thought it sounded like just the thing - an independent film that's received only limited distribution, starring an actress with name recognition - to showcase at the festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2003
Art Starting tonight, photographers Christopher Myers and Alexey Titarenko team up to present highly subjective views of the former Soviet Union at C. Grimaldis Gallery. In Images From Russia, Baltimore native Myers explores the old-world quietude of St. Petersburg and the influence of the West on the traditional Russian culture of Moscow. Titarenko's Black and White Magic of St. Petersburg probes the elusive subconscious of his native city in pictures that re-create the private spaces of individual experience.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 26, 2001
The Muse in Exile: Emigres and Divas series continues Thursday with Ninotchka, a 1939 romance named for a lovely Bolshevik in Paris played by Greta Garbo. The picture weds the understated virtuosity of Ernst Lubitsch's direction to the unabashed wisecracking of a script by Billy Wilder, Charles Brackett and Walter Reisch. The movie is full of cynical jokes in what became the established Wilder manner: Ninotchka defends Stalin's purges with the declaration, "There are going to be fewer but better Russians!"
NEWS
June 5, 2000
Matilda "Babe" Bitzenburger, 86, a national champion archer who taught movie stars such as Vivien Leigh and Tony Curtis, died Sunday in Oregon. She was 96. Mrs. Bitzenburger, known as the Annie Oakley of the bow and arrow, appeared in newsreels and television shows in the 1940s, '50s and early '60s dressed in movie-star cowgirl regalia. In 1929, she married Henry A. Bitzenburger, who was a competition archer. She soon picked up a bow and turned out to be a natural. She sold the beauty salon she owned to devote more time to the sport and began entering competitions.
FEATURES
By Dinitia Smith and Dinitia Smith,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 18, 2000
For close to 40 years, film scholars and biographers of Greta Garbo have waited for the day when 55 letters and 32 cards and telegrams that the actress wrote to Mercedes de Acosta, a playwright, screen writer and poet, would be unsealed at Philadelphia's Rosenbach Museum & Library. Garbo fans hoped that the letters would finally reveal truths at the center of Garbo's mystery, particularly about the sensitive and ambiguous matter of her sexuality. Now many of the letters have been made public, but in true Garbo style, the truths about her private life remain elusive.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Chris Kaltenbach and Ann Hornaday and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1999
Cyd Charisse as Greta Garbo?Not that Charisse was ever actually asked to play the legendary Swedish actress who so craved to be alone. But she did get to play one of Garbo's most famous roles in 1957, when the musical version of "Ninotchka" was filmed as "Silk Stockings."The result, which Charisse says is one of her favorite films -- since she got to dance opposite Fred Astaire, accompanied by Cole Porter's music, it's no wonder -- is being screened at the Senator Thursday.And in a real treat for local film buffs (as if seeing Astaire and Charisse on the big screen isn't treat enough)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 16, 1999
What, no Lassie?The American Film Institute's list of the Top 50 "screen legends" of all time -- 25 men, 25 women -- was released with considerable hoopla on CBS last night, with 50 of today's stars paying tribute to their predecessors. And apart from the omission of America's favorite collie, just about all the big names made the cut.Among the men, there's Humphrey Bogart atop the list (putting the AFI in tune with Entertainment Weekly, which named him the top movie star of all time), followed by Cary Grant, James Stewart, Marlon Brando and Fred Astaire.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 21, 2003
Movie fans who can't wait for Baltimore's spring festival season can get a jump on things this weekend, as the first Annapolis Reel Cinema Festival gets cranking in the state capital. Featuring mostly the works of young, aspiring and often local filmmakers, the festival includes a few surprise bonuses as well, including tonight's kick-off presentation, Morvern Callar. The Scottish film, from writer-director Lynne Ramsay, stars Samantha Morton (Sweet and Lowdown, Minority Report) as Morvern, a supermarket clerk who sets out for Ibiza after her boyfriend commits suicide, taking with her his unpublished novel, which she passes off as her own. Noi Mahoney, a business reporter for the Annapolis Capital who organized this year's festival, said he heard about the film from a friend living overseas and thought it sounded like just the thing - an independent film that's received only limited distribution, starring an actress with name recognition - to showcase at the festival.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 16, 1999
What, no Lassie?The American Film Institute's list of the Top 50 "screen legends" of all time -- 25 men, 25 women -- was released with considerable hoopla on CBS last night, with 50 of today's stars paying tribute to their predecessors. And apart from the omission of America's favorite collie, just about all the big names made the cut.Among the men, there's Humphrey Bogart atop the list (putting the AFI in tune with Entertainment Weekly, which named him the top movie star of all time), followed by Cary Grant, James Stewart, Marlon Brando and Fred Astaire.
NEWS
March 27, 1993
HAVING RECENTLY acquired a copy of the latest (16th) edition of "Bartlett's Familiar Quotations" (Justin Kaplan, general editor), a brief skim-through reveals some fascinating changes.For one thing, the book's index seems almost as long as the text -- and that, indeed, is the case. The familiar quotations take up 791 pages; the indexed listing of these quotes runs a mind-boggling 608 pages.There are more than 20,000 well-known (and not-so well-known) comments in the new edition. Many of the new entries are taken from modern-day popular culture.
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