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By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2014
A Maryland man is suing British Airways over an intended flight to Spain that ended up taking him to the West Indies. In court documents, Edward Gamson said he booked a first-class flight from Washington Dulles International Airport to Granada, Spain, via London last September for him and his partner. But he said British Airways instead put the two on a flight to Grenada, an island in the Caribbean, some 4,000 miles from his intended destination. Gamson said he did not realize the error until the flight had departed London and was already over the Atlantic en route to the West Indies.
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TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2014
A Maryland man is suing British Airways over an intended flight to Spain that ended up taking him to the West Indies. In court documents, Edward Gamson said he booked a first-class flight from Washington Dulles International Airport to Granada, Spain, via London last September for him and his partner. But he said British Airways instead put the two on a flight to Grenada, an island in the Caribbean, some 4,000 miles from his intended destination. Gamson said he did not realize the error until the flight had departed London and was already over the Atlantic en route to the West Indies.
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TRAVEL
By Bruce Mohl and Bruce Mohl,Boston Globe | November 7, 2004
Grand Cayman and Grenada are still trying to recover from the hurricanes that swept through the Caribbean, but other islands are already putting out the welcome mat for tourists. Before you book a visit to an island, try to find out the extent of any damage. Reliable information can be hard to come by in the tourist-dependent Carib-bean. Hotel Web sites are often not reliable. If possible, talk to someone with direct knowledge of an island's or a resort's conditions -- someone who has just been there, for example.
TRAVEL
By RICHARD RUSSELL | August 24, 2008
My wife, Sally, and I live in Eldersburg. We took a 10-night cruise on the Emerald Princess in early April. We had beautiful weather every day and visited Aruba, Bonaire, Grenada, Dominica, St. Thomas and Princess Cays. I took this shot at sunset from the ship docked at St. George's, Grenada. I would recommend this cruise ship and itinerary to anybody. The Baltimore Sun welcomes submissions for "My Best Shot." Photos should be accompanied by a description of when and where you took the picture and your name, address and phone number.
FEATURES
By Joyce Dalton | October 6, 1991
Believe it or not, island-lovers, plenty of people are not in a hurry to go to the Caribbean.After a couple days of ooh-ing over palm-fringed beauty and feeling pretty smart to have escaped -- however temporarily -- the hustle-bustle at home, they get desperate for something to do.More accurately, something to see. This breed of tourist craves sightseeing and would rather get a great photo than a great tan.With a few exceptions, tourist sites aren't the...
NEWS
By Richard Chacon and Richard Chacon,BOSTON GLOBE | January 27, 2001
TRUE BLUE POINT, Grenada - It was a tiny, offshore medical school thrust into the middle of the Cold War when U.S. troops stormed this island nation in 1983 for what the Reagan administration billed as a rescue of American students from the threat of an unstable government. Back then, St. George's Medical School was little more than a cluster of trailer-style buildings tucked into a lush tropical hillside, a haven for aspiring American doctors who couldn't get into a stateside program.
NEWS
By Mark Fineman and Mark Fineman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 12, 2002
GRENVILLE, Grenada - For half a millennium, the aromatic little seed of the Myristica fragrans tree is said to have cured everything from boils and backaches to strokes and the plague. Arabs and Indians swear it's an aphrodisiac. Malcolm X smoked it in jail when he ran out of marijuana. Wars were fought over it - including one that rendered the obscure New World island of Manhattan to the British. Today it's in toothpaste, perfume, sausages and soap - not to mention countless cups of eggnog.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | September 3, 1993
It's the cable that's supposed to go through the roof, not the rate.Bill wants the armed forces to be ready for two wars simultaneously, one against Grenada and the other with Nauru.
FEATURES
October 25, 2007
Oct. 25 1983 A U.S.-led force invaded Grenada at the order of President Reagan, who said the action was needed to protect U.S. citizens there.
TRAVEL
By RICHARD RUSSELL | August 24, 2008
My wife, Sally, and I live in Eldersburg. We took a 10-night cruise on the Emerald Princess in early April. We had beautiful weather every day and visited Aruba, Bonaire, Grenada, Dominica, St. Thomas and Princess Cays. I took this shot at sunset from the ship docked at St. George's, Grenada. I would recommend this cruise ship and itinerary to anybody. The Baltimore Sun welcomes submissions for "My Best Shot." Photos should be accompanied by a description of when and where you took the picture and your name, address and phone number.
FEATURES
October 25, 2007
Oct. 25 1983 A U.S.-led force invaded Grenada at the order of President Reagan, who said the action was needed to protect U.S. citizens there.
TRAVEL
By Bruce Mohl and Bruce Mohl,Boston Globe | November 7, 2004
Grand Cayman and Grenada are still trying to recover from the hurricanes that swept through the Caribbean, but other islands are already putting out the welcome mat for tourists. Before you book a visit to an island, try to find out the extent of any damage. Reliable information can be hard to come by in the tourist-dependent Carib-bean. Hotel Web sites are often not reliable. If possible, talk to someone with direct knowledge of an island's or a resort's conditions -- someone who has just been there, for example.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,SUN STAFF | September 13, 2004
As a child, Anthony Greenidge of Randallstown would listen in awe to his grandparents' horrific tales of Hurricane Janet, the storm that thrashed his tiny Caribbean island homeland of Grenada in 1955. Enduring days without food or water, his grandparents said the family only barely survived. Greenidge's birth, just a month after the storm hit, was a miracle, according to family lore. Today, no one in his family expected a storm as wicked as Janet to strike again. But it did. "Ivan is 10 times worse," he said.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | June 12, 2004
IF I'VE HEARD it once since President Reagan died, I've heard it a dozen times. "Reagan didn't do anything for black people." Since Reagan was elected president of all Americans, you have to wonder from whence came the notion that he, or any other American president, should do anything "for" one particular ethnic or racial group. Still, the argument can be made that Reagan did for black people what he did for Americans of every other race and ethnicity: He tried his best to disabuse us of the notion that the federal government is our mommy and daddy.
NEWS
February 4, 2004
Two Coast Guard petty officers from Boston and a former Grenada police officer were charged in a federal complaint made public yesterday with conspiracy to import cocaine. Authorities identified the two Coast Guard officers as Wendy Bens, 25, an electrician's mate, and Jonathan Louis DeCarlo, 23, a gunner's mate, both assigned to the Coast Guard cutter Spencer. The third defendant was identified as Alison Cletus Isaac Alexander, 35, a former drug task force officer in Grenada now living in Yorktown, Va. According to the complaint filed in U.S. District Court, authorities seized 4 pounds of cocaine from a suitcase belonging to Alexander after he arrived at Baltimore-Washington International Airport on Jan. 27. Customs agents replaced the cocaine with powder, then followed Alexander to a hotel, where they said the suitcase was picked up by Bens and DeCarlo.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | October 25, 2003
Oct. 25, 1983 - 20 years ago to the day. Can you remember what you were doing? Randallstown resident Don Rojas can. He was on the run, trying to elude patrols that had been ordered to shoot him on sight. This all-too-real drama took place in the tiny nation of Grenada, which lies near the end of a long chain of eastern Caribbean islands. Rojas had returned to his native Grenada in 1979 to serve in the government of his schoolmate Prime Minister Maurice Bishop (both had attended Presentation Brothers College, a high school in St. George's, Grenada's capital)
NEWS
February 4, 2004
Two Coast Guard petty officers from Boston and a former Grenada police officer were charged in a federal complaint made public yesterday with conspiracy to import cocaine. Authorities identified the two Coast Guard officers as Wendy Bens, 25, an electrician's mate, and Jonathan Louis DeCarlo, 23, a gunner's mate, both assigned to the Coast Guard cutter Spencer. The third defendant was identified as Alison Cletus Isaac Alexander, 35, a former drug task force officer in Grenada now living in Yorktown, Va. According to the complaint filed in U.S. District Court, authorities seized 4 pounds of cocaine from a suitcase belonging to Alexander after he arrived at Baltimore-Washington International Airport on Jan. 27. Customs agents replaced the cocaine with powder, then followed Alexander to a hotel, where they said the suitcase was picked up by Bens and DeCarlo.
NEWS
By Mark Fineman and Mark Fineman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 12, 2002
GRENVILLE, Grenada - For half a millennium, the aromatic little seed of the Myristica fragrans tree is said to have cured everything from boils and backaches to strokes and the plague. Arabs and Indians swear it's an aphrodisiac. Malcolm X smoked it in jail when he ran out of marijuana. Wars were fought over it - including one that rendered the obscure New World island of Manhattan to the British. Today it's in toothpaste, perfume, sausages and soap - not to mention countless cups of eggnog.
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