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Greivis Vasquez

SPORTS
By Baltimore Sun staff | April 3, 2010
Two days after winning the Bob Cousy Award given to the nation's top point guard, Maryland senior Greivis Vasquez picked up three additional honors. On Saturday, Vasquez was named a second-team All-American by the NCAA, earned a spot on the State Farm Coaches All-America second team, and was one of 10 players chosen for the Wooden Award All-American team. Vasquez was joined on the All-America second team by Cole Aldrich (Kansas), James Anderson (Oklahoma State), DeMarcus Cousins (Kentucky)
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ENTERTAINMENT
by Matt Vensel | matt@bthesite.com and b free daily | April 2, 2010
Outside of the Orioles whittling down the big-league roster to 25 guys, it was a slow news week. Don't worry, I still found local sports stuff to make fun of, though. [1] The Orioles open the 2010 season Tuesday at Tampa Bay, but their roster was pretty much finalized the middle of this week. The biggest story (even though the writing has been on the wall) was that David Hernandez was named the O's fifth starter, not Chris Tillman . Hernandez had a nice spring, posting a 3.00 ERA in five outings while striking out 20 in 15 innings.
SPORTS
By Sports Digest | March 30, 2010
Maryland senior point guard Greivis Vasquez was named to the All-America second team by the Associated Press on Tuesday. Vasquez, the Atlantic Coast Conference Player of the Year and the second-leading scorer in Terrapin history, led Maryland to a 24-9 record and into the second round of the NCAA tournament. He averaged 19.6 points and 6.3 assists in 2009-10, both team highs, and added 4.6 rebounds per game. Vasquez earned first-team All America honors from Sporting News and FoxSports.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Matt Vensel | matt@bthesite.com and b free daily | March 23, 2010
A stunned Jordan Williams sat on the floor for a few moments after Korie Lucious nailed his buzzer-beating, kidney-punching three-pointer Sunday -- Williams' sizable rear end parked in the paint, like always. As the less-than-impressive Michigan State cheerleading crew stormed the Spokane Arena court and celebrated the Spartans' 85-83 win a few yards away, the future face of Maryland basketball gazed dead ahead. Only Williams knows what was on his mind. Perhaps the freshman big man was looking back on his first season in College Park.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker | jeff.barker@baltsun.com | March 23, 2010
- It would be appropriate to remember Maryland's 2009-10 basketball season for an electric end-of-game run during which the Terrapins erased a nine-point deficit in less than a minute and a half. The run was engineered by the sort of pressing, full-court defense that characterized the high-energy team all season. The Terps, not a dominant inside team, generally needed to outwork their opponents. But the hard reality is that the frenetic comeback in Sunday's Michigan State game will be obscured in the team's collective memory by what immediately followed - a rainbow 3-pointer by backup guard Korie Lucious that sent the fifth-seeded Spartans into the NCAA tournament's Sweet 16. The outcome is certain to linger with the Terps (24-9)
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd | March 22, 2010
U nbelievable comeback. Unbelievable ending. Unbelievable heart shown by two terrific teams. Backup guard Korie Lucious ended Maryland's season Sunday with a dagger, a 3-pointer at the buzzer that gave Michigan State an 85-83 win in the second round of the NCAA tournament's Midwest Regional. So there will be no Sweet 16 appearance for the Terps, something they had aimed for all season and something they hadn't achieved since 2003. But there was no shame in going out like this.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker | jeff.barker@baltsun.com | March 21, 2010
- Jordan Williams raced off the court, slapping hands with fans behind Maryland's bench as he headed toward the Spokane Arena tunnel. Greivis Vasquez leaped up onto a chair and pumped his fist repeatedly at a cluster of red-clad Terrapins backers in the stands. Handwritten in red ink on one of Vasquez's white sneakers were the words "Win" and "Love the Game." The Terrapins were loving the game more than ever after overcoming early NCAA tournament jitters to beat Houston, 89-77, and advance to today's meeting with Michigan State for a spot in the Sweet Sixteen.
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd | March 21, 2010
Unbelievable comeback. Unbelievable ending. Unbelievable heart shown by two terrific teams. Back-up guard Korie Lucious ended Maryland's season today with a dagger, a three-pointer at the buzzer that gave Michigan State an 85-83 win in the second round of the NCAA Tournament's Midwest Regional. So there will be no Sweet 16 appearance for the Terps, something they had pointed to all season and something they hadn't done since 2003. But there was no shame in going out like this.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Matt Vensel | matt@bthesite.com and b free daily | March 18, 2010
March Madness has taken over Charm City. The Terps and Bears have their dancing shoes on, but will their dance marathon last through the weekend? [1] College Park's favorite lightning rod, senior guard Greivis Vasquez , will get one last chance to make the Terps a winner again at the NCAA tournament. Fourth-seeded Maryland plays 13th-seeded Houston in the first round of the tournament Friday night. I pointed out in a column two weeks ago that Vasquez has failed to deliver a signature postseason run in his four years at Maryland.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg | kevin.vanvalkenburg@baltsun.com | March 18, 2010
Pretend for a second that basketball players are artists. Greivis Vasquez would be Picasso. Complex, fascinating, sometimes messy, frequently daring, occasionally overrated, but generally brilliant. It would be an easy comparison even if they didn't share the Spanish language. There is nothing subtle about either. In that case, Maryland's Eric Hayes might just be American painter Edward Hopper. Quiet. Consistent. Subtle and sparse. Underrated. Underappreciated during his time.
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