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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | October 20, 1991
Washington -- It is as if the earth itself has buckled and cracked and, amid geysers of steam and far-off flashes of lightning, lumbering from the Mesozoic muck, slow-moving and majestic, craggy and plated as a stegosaurus, comes . . . Gregory Peck.It's not that Peck is a dinosaur; he is in fact, at 75, a charming, extraordinarily likable and decent man. It is, rather, that his form of movie stardom is extinct. Stars had faces then but they also had moral weight and unchallenged authority.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan King and Susan King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 15, 2005
Though it's a relative quiet week for new releases - Crash and the first season of Lost are the big news - there are so many vintage films coming out on DVD that the cineaste may go blurry-eyed with the treasure trove of horror classics, film noirs, dramas, comedies and even animated films to savor. Universal's Legacy Series ($27 each) features disc sets of three Academy Award-winners: To Kill a Mockingbird (1962); The Sting (1973) and The Deer Hunter (1978). Mockingbird, which stars Gregory Peck in his Oscar-winning role as the compassionate Southern lawyer Atticus Finch, features an artistic "making of" documentary; Peck's Oscar and AFI Life Achievement Award acceptance speeches; "A Conversation With Gregory Peck," an engaging documentary directed by his daughter Cecilia Peck and Barbara Kopple; and commentary with director Robert Mulligan and the late producer Alan J. Pakula.
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NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 13, 2003
Gregory Peck, who died yesterday at age 87, built a tower of celluloid on that now-rare movie quality, strength of character. Like Gary Cooper before him, he expressed with peerless authority what used to be called American virtues: decency, fortitude, self-reliance and an equal capacity for group leadership. With his wife of 48 years, Veronique, at his side, Mr. Peck died of natural causes about 4 a.m. at his Los Angeles home, family spokesman Monroe Friedman said. "He wasn't feeling well," Mr. Friedman said.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | June 25, 2003
ARLINGTON, Va. - Gregory Peck, who died this month, had many roles for which he will long be remembered. The one that may have had the most influence on this country was the "voice-over" he provided in 1987 for a TV commercial falsely characterizing Supreme Court nominee Robert H. Bork as favoring poll taxes and literacy tests, among other horrors. The same liberal groups that "Borked" Mr. Bork are preparing a campaign against President Bush's nominee, should one or more justices retire.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | April 18, 2001
You don't have to admire "A Conversation with Gregory Peck," airing tonight as part of the acclaimed "American Masters" series on PBS. The 90-minute film is directed and produced by two-time Academy Award-winner Barbara Kopple ("Harlan County USA" and "American Dream"), and it's a pleasure to sit back and let such a gifted storyteller take you where she will with her camera. In this program, there's only Peck and Kopple's camera - no correspondent, no narrator, no production razzle-dazzle to come between you and the subject.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan King and Susan King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 15, 2005
Though it's a relative quiet week for new releases - Crash and the first season of Lost are the big news - there are so many vintage films coming out on DVD that the cineaste may go blurry-eyed with the treasure trove of horror classics, film noirs, dramas, comedies and even animated films to savor. Universal's Legacy Series ($27 each) features disc sets of three Academy Award-winners: To Kill a Mockingbird (1962); The Sting (1973) and The Deer Hunter (1978). Mockingbird, which stars Gregory Peck in his Oscar-winning role as the compassionate Southern lawyer Atticus Finch, features an artistic "making of" documentary; Peck's Oscar and AFI Life Achievement Award acceptance speeches; "A Conversation With Gregory Peck," an engaging documentary directed by his daughter Cecilia Peck and Barbara Kopple; and commentary with director Robert Mulligan and the late producer Alan J. Pakula.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Knight Ridder / Tribune | November 18, 2001
"Scarlett O'Hara was not beautiful," wrote Margaret Mitchell in the opening lines of Gone With the Wind. But that didn't stop David O. Selznick from casting Vivien Leigh, who was, in the part. Lovers of the novel were appalled. Just as, when the casts for Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone and The Fellowship of the Ring (opening in December) were announced, some devotees of the novels of J.K. Rowling and J.R.R. Tolkien howled. Lots of people, when they read novels, imagine them as movies, which leads to disappointment when the novels become films.
NEWS
December 19, 1990
Anne Revere, an actress who won acclaim for her screen portrayals of wise, protective motherly characters until her career was cut short by the 1950s Communist blacklist, died Monday at her home in Locust Valley, N.Y. She was 87. The stately, spirited character actress won a 1945 Academy Award as the mother of Elizabeth Taylor in "National Velvet." Miss Revere was also nominated for supporting Oscars for playing the mothers of Jennifer Jones in "The Song of Bernadette" (1943) and of Gregory Peck in "Gentleman's Agreement" (1947)
FEATURES
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau of The Sun | December 9, 1991
Washington -- Only during the weekend of the Kennedy Center Honors is one likely to find legendary tap dancer Fayard Nicholas hoofing it up for cameras in the lobby of the State Department. Or Gregory Peck holding forth at the White House. Or Congress and Cabinet types jostling to get an audience with the likes of Lauren Bacall, Carol Burnett, Patti LuPone or Martin Scorcese.In fact, only during this annual weekend of glitter and glamour -- capped by last night's star-packed show of music and dance at the Kennedy Center attended by the President and Mrs. Bush -- does official Washington seem to be awe-struck by something other than itself.
FEATURES
By Debbie M. Price and Debbie M. Price,SUN STAFF | November 8, 1998
"Breaking News," by Robert MacNeil. Nan A Talese Doubleday. 406 pages. $24.95. Revered network news anchorman Grant Munro - "Gregory Peck" to the mysterious and jivy online gossip columnist "Hollygo Lightly" - is facing 60 and the biggest decision of his aging career: Should he get a facelift?It's hard to imagine that revered television newsman Robert MacNeil ever spent a nanosecond pondering a nip-and-tuck. But in all other ways - and maybe in this way too, who knows? - Grant Munro is MacNeil.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 13, 2003
Gregory Peck, who died yesterday at age 87, built a tower of celluloid on that now-rare movie quality, strength of character. Like Gary Cooper before him, he expressed with peerless authority what used to be called American virtues: decency, fortitude, self-reliance and an equal capacity for group leadership. With his wife of 48 years, Veronique, at his side, Mr. Peck died of natural causes about 4 a.m. at his Los Angeles home, family spokesman Monroe Friedman said. "He wasn't feeling well," Mr. Friedman said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Knight Ridder / Tribune | November 18, 2001
"Scarlett O'Hara was not beautiful," wrote Margaret Mitchell in the opening lines of Gone With the Wind. But that didn't stop David O. Selznick from casting Vivien Leigh, who was, in the part. Lovers of the novel were appalled. Just as, when the casts for Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone and The Fellowship of the Ring (opening in December) were announced, some devotees of the novels of J.K. Rowling and J.R.R. Tolkien howled. Lots of people, when they read novels, imagine them as movies, which leads to disappointment when the novels become films.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | April 18, 2001
You don't have to admire "A Conversation with Gregory Peck," airing tonight as part of the acclaimed "American Masters" series on PBS. The 90-minute film is directed and produced by two-time Academy Award-winner Barbara Kopple ("Harlan County USA" and "American Dream"), and it's a pleasure to sit back and let such a gifted storyteller take you where she will with her camera. In this program, there's only Peck and Kopple's camera - no correspondent, no narrator, no production razzle-dazzle to come between you and the subject.
FEATURES
By Debbie M. Price and Debbie M. Price,SUN STAFF | November 8, 1998
"Breaking News," by Robert MacNeil. Nan A Talese Doubleday. 406 pages. $24.95. Revered network news anchorman Grant Munro - "Gregory Peck" to the mysterious and jivy online gossip columnist "Hollygo Lightly" - is facing 60 and the biggest decision of his aging career: Should he get a facelift?It's hard to imagine that revered television newsman Robert MacNeil ever spent a nanosecond pondering a nip-and-tuck. But in all other ways - and maybe in this way too, who knows? - Grant Munro is MacNeil.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | May 6, 1993
Corny as it sounds, "The Will Rogers Follies" is a highly likable show about the man who never met a man he didn't like.When Keith Carradine, in the title role, says, "I'm happy when I'm standing up there in front of all those folks, and I know I'm making them happy," it sums up not only his performance, but also the overall effect of this razzle-dazzle musical, which opened at the Lyric Opera House last night.Subtitled, "A Life in Revue," "The Will Rogers Follies" -- score by Cy Coleman, Betty Comden and Adolph Green, book by Peter Stone, and direction and choreography by Tommy Tune -- is not a typical showbiz bio. Instead, Stone's clever book presents Rogers' life story within the format of a Ziegfeld Follies show.
FEATURES
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau of The Sun | December 9, 1991
Washington -- Only during the weekend of the Kennedy Center Honors is one likely to find legendary tap dancer Fayard Nicholas hoofing it up for cameras in the lobby of the State Department. Or Gregory Peck holding forth at the White House. Or Congress and Cabinet types jostling to get an audience with the likes of Lauren Bacall, Carol Burnett, Patti LuPone or Martin Scorcese.In fact, only during this annual weekend of glitter and glamour -- capped by last night's star-packed show of music and dance at the Kennedy Center attended by the President and Mrs. Bush -- does official Washington seem to be awe-struck by something other than itself.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | May 6, 1993
Corny as it sounds, "The Will Rogers Follies" is a highly likable show about the man who never met a man he didn't like.When Keith Carradine, in the title role, says, "I'm happy when I'm standing up there in front of all those folks, and I know I'm making them happy," it sums up not only his performance, but also the overall effect of this razzle-dazzle musical, which opened at the Lyric Opera House last night.Subtitled, "A Life in Revue," "The Will Rogers Follies" -- score by Cy Coleman, Betty Comden and Adolph Green, book by Peter Stone, and direction and choreography by Tommy Tune -- is not a typical showbiz bio. Instead, Stone's clever book presents Rogers' life story within the format of a Ziegfeld Follies show.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | June 25, 2003
ARLINGTON, Va. - Gregory Peck, who died this month, had many roles for which he will long be remembered. The one that may have had the most influence on this country was the "voice-over" he provided in 1987 for a TV commercial falsely characterizing Supreme Court nominee Robert H. Bork as favoring poll taxes and literacy tests, among other horrors. The same liberal groups that "Borked" Mr. Bork are preparing a campaign against President Bush's nominee, should one or more justices retire.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | October 20, 1991
Washington -- It is as if the earth itself has buckled and cracked and, amid geysers of steam and far-off flashes of lightning, lumbering from the Mesozoic muck, slow-moving and majestic, craggy and plated as a stegosaurus, comes . . . Gregory Peck.It's not that Peck is a dinosaur; he is in fact, at 75, a charming, extraordinarily likable and decent man. It is, rather, that his form of movie stardom is extinct. Stars had faces then but they also had moral weight and unchallenged authority.
NEWS
December 19, 1990
Anne Revere, an actress who won acclaim for her screen portrayals of wise, protective motherly characters until her career was cut short by the 1950s Communist blacklist, died Monday at her home in Locust Valley, N.Y. She was 87. The stately, spirited character actress won a 1945 Academy Award as the mother of Elizabeth Taylor in "National Velvet." Miss Revere was also nominated for supporting Oscars for playing the mothers of Jennifer Jones in "The Song of Bernadette" (1943) and of Gregory Peck in "Gentleman's Agreement" (1947)
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