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Gregory Hines

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By SYLVIA BADGER | November 3, 1996
THE MULTI-talented Gregory Hines played to a full house at Baltimore's ninth annual Lifesongs for AIDS, held at the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall. His performance, along with appearances by comedian George Wallace and seven young tap dancers called the Hot Steppers, made for a nice evening. Another talented young man who put on quite a performance was the show's interpreter-signer Kevin M. Campbell, who volunteered his services for Lifesongs. He was so animated that many sitting near me thought he was part of the act. In real life, Kevin does indeed work as an interpreter.
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By Gwendolyn Glenn | April 3, 2014
If great theater is your thing, Arena Stage is the place to be. The Southwest Washington, D.C., theater has been on a roll this season, with exceptional plays that covered a broad range of subjects, featuring well-known cast members. I've always felt that Arena Stage's productions have reflected the diversity of the nation's capital and this season has been no exception. I haven't seen the entire lineup, but many this season fall in that category, such as the by-popular-demand repeat performance of the explosive "One Night With Janis Joplin.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | January 21, 1991
"Eve of Destruction" was created from a grisly rib pulled out of "Terminator" and inserted crudely into an inflatable woman who was then read Betty Friedan's "The Feminine Mystique" and equipped by Military Armament Corporation of Smyrna, Ga. In other words, it's a sci fi-automatic weapons-feminist revenge fantasy, and its natural audience is science fiction fans who love machine guns and hate men, all seven of them.The set up is crude and as free of believability as it is of convincing detail.
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By Libre Lelliott and Libre Lelliott,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 26, 2002
There are certain performers whom, had you only known, you would have caught in the first moments of their careers. Maybe you would have been among the jive-talkin' hep cats at the club when Miles Davis first explored bebop. Or stood in line at the Paramount to discover Frank Sinatra discovering George and Ira Gershwin. Maybe you wouldn't have missed the chance to catch Rudolf Nureyev before he left the Kirov Ballet. If only you'd known. Starting tonight at the Lyric Opera House, the man Gregory Hines calls "the greatest tap dancer ever to lace up a pair of Capezios" is in town.
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By Libre Lelliott and Libre Lelliott,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 26, 2002
There are certain performers whom, had you only known, you would have caught in the first moments of their careers. Maybe you would have been among the jive-talkin' hep cats at the club when Miles Davis first explored bebop. Or stood in line at the Paramount to discover Frank Sinatra discovering George and Ira Gershwin. Maybe you wouldn't have missed the chance to catch Rudolf Nureyev before he left the Kirov Ballet. If only you'd known. Starting tonight at the Lyric Opera House, the man Gregory Hines calls "the greatest tap dancer ever to lace up a pair of Capezios" is in town.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | October 23, 1996
Tap dancer. Actor. Singer.Gregory Hines can answer to all three titles. However, there is one more title he is particularly fond of these days."I'm a grandfather," says Hines. "He's 2 years old and I am still very excited about that."Too soon to tell if the grandson will follow in the legendary Hines family's fancy footsteps. But, just give him time.Hines will be doing it all Sunday, except for the grandfathering thing, at the Meyerhoff, where he is performing for an AIDS benefit."I'm coming to town with a six-piece band, two backup singers and I'm bringing my own tap floor so I can be heard," Hines says.
FEATURES
By LAURA CHARLES | February 13, 1991
SEPARATED AT BIRTH?: Rave reviews are in for "An Evenin with Gregory Hines," a benefit for the Advocates for Children and Youth.The audience Sunday at the Meyerhoff was tickled pink when the singer-dancer stepped down from the stage to cavort merrily among them. All but maybe interior designer Alex Baer, who was singled out by the star because of his likeness to former president Jimmy Carter."Are you sure you're not him?" Hines quizzed the somewhat embarrassed Baer, who looked like he was trying to slip into his first "out of body" experience.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | February 24, 2000
Gregory Hines at the Meyerhoff Enjoy a program of song and dance when Gregory Hines performs today through Sunday at the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, 1212 Cathedral St. The tap-dance master, movie and television star, film director and Tony Award-winning Broadway actor presents a spectrum of his talents at 2 p.m. today, 8 p.m. tomorrow and Saturday, and 3 p.m. Sunday. Tickets are $26-$64. Call 410-783-8000. African-American Grand Tour Travel back in time to observe Baltimore's past on the fourth annual African-American Grand Tour.
NEWS
By Gwendolyn Glenn | April 3, 2014
If great theater is your thing, Arena Stage is the place to be. The Southwest Washington, D.C., theater has been on a roll this season, with exceptional plays that covered a broad range of subjects, featuring well-known cast members. I've always felt that Arena Stage's productions have reflected the diversity of the nation's capital and this season has been no exception. I haven't seen the entire lineup, but many this season fall in that category, such as the by-popular-demand repeat performance of the explosive "One Night With Janis Joplin.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | January 17, 1991
* ''Eve of Destruction'' A robot, designed to look exactly like her creator, turns bad. Gregory Hines and Renee Sutendijk star.* ''Flight of the Intruder'' A Navy pilot and a bombardier go against orders and bomb Hanoi. Willem Dafoe, Danny Glover and Brad Johnson star.* ''Green Card'' A comedy starring Gerard Depardieu as a Frenchman who marries an American woman (Andie MacDowell) to gain possession of a green card, one that will allow him to work in this country.* ''Hamlet'' Mel Gibson, who was introduced to American audiences as Max Max, plays the melancholy Dane in Franco Zeffirelli's version of the Shakespearean tragedy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | February 24, 2000
Gregory Hines at the Meyerhoff Enjoy a program of song and dance when Gregory Hines performs today through Sunday at the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, 1212 Cathedral St. The tap-dance master, movie and television star, film director and Tony Award-winning Broadway actor presents a spectrum of his talents at 2 p.m. today, 8 p.m. tomorrow and Saturday, and 3 p.m. Sunday. Tickets are $26-$64. Call 410-783-8000. African-American Grand Tour Travel back in time to observe Baltimore's past on the fourth annual African-American Grand Tour.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | November 3, 1996
THE MULTI-talented Gregory Hines played to a full house at Baltimore's ninth annual Lifesongs for AIDS, held at the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall. His performance, along with appearances by comedian George Wallace and seven young tap dancers called the Hot Steppers, made for a nice evening. Another talented young man who put on quite a performance was the show's interpreter-signer Kevin M. Campbell, who volunteered his services for Lifesongs. He was so animated that many sitting near me thought he was part of the act. In real life, Kevin does indeed work as an interpreter.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | October 23, 1996
Tap dancer. Actor. Singer.Gregory Hines can answer to all three titles. However, there is one more title he is particularly fond of these days."I'm a grandfather," says Hines. "He's 2 years old and I am still very excited about that."Too soon to tell if the grandson will follow in the legendary Hines family's fancy footsteps. But, just give him time.Hines will be doing it all Sunday, except for the grandfathering thing, at the Meyerhoff, where he is performing for an AIDS benefit."I'm coming to town with a six-piece band, two backup singers and I'm bringing my own tap floor so I can be heard," Hines says.
FEATURES
By LAURA CHARLES | February 13, 1991
SEPARATED AT BIRTH?: Rave reviews are in for "An Evenin with Gregory Hines," a benefit for the Advocates for Children and Youth.The audience Sunday at the Meyerhoff was tickled pink when the singer-dancer stepped down from the stage to cavort merrily among them. All but maybe interior designer Alex Baer, who was singled out by the star because of his likeness to former president Jimmy Carter."Are you sure you're not him?" Hines quizzed the somewhat embarrassed Baer, who looked like he was trying to slip into his first "out of body" experience.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | January 21, 1991
"Eve of Destruction" was created from a grisly rib pulled out of "Terminator" and inserted crudely into an inflatable woman who was then read Betty Friedan's "The Feminine Mystique" and equipped by Military Armament Corporation of Smyrna, Ga. In other words, it's a sci fi-automatic weapons-feminist revenge fantasy, and its natural audience is science fiction fans who love machine guns and hate men, all seven of them.The set up is crude and as free of believability as it is of convincing detail.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lewis Segal and Lewis Segal,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 1, 2005
When Savion Glover isn't redefining the art of tap-dancing, he slips the most famous feet in show business into size 12 1/2 Jordans or boots. Filling that footwear would be a tall order for anyone else, because nobody in millennial dance so dominates any style or idiom as definitively as Glover dominates tap. At 31, he's the acknowledged master - the summation of tap's past, the torchbearer for its future - with no real rivals on the horizon, but plenty...
NEWS
By Baltimoresun.com Staff | September 16, 2004
Baltimore County police today asked the public's help in locating a missing man identified Gregory Hines, 56. Police described Hines as black, standing 5 feet 8 inches tall and weighing 160 pounds, with salt and pepper-colored hair, a goatee and no teeth. Hines was last seen around 9 p.m. Wednesday in front of his residence near the 2800 block of Yorkway in Baltimore. Police said he is without his daily medication required to alleviate symptoms of dementia and seizures. Unable to operate a vehicle, he is most likely traveling by foot, according to police.
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