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Greg Louganis

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By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Sun Staff Writer | March 11, 1995
It's a well-trod path by now, the road to best-seller status for the celebrity author: first the exclusive Barbara Walters confessional, then Larry King Live, then Oprah, then a multi-city tour for bookstore signings and interviews with the local media.This time, it's Greg Louganis drawing the cameras and the crowds with his new tell-all, "Breaking the Surface" (Random House, $23), which has shot to the top of best-seller lists just two weeks after hitting the shelves.But underneath the hyperactive, circus-like atmosphere of the modern-day book tour, there is a discomfiting aspect to this one, a sense of sadness that no amount of bright lights and big crowds can change.
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SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE and BILL ORDINE,SUN REPORTER | April 6, 2007
Yesterday's death of Darryl Stingley, the former New England Patriots wide receiver who was paralyzed as a result of a brutal hit by the Oakland Raiders' Jack Tatum in a 1978 NFL preseason game, is a reminder that sports isn't always fun and games. Athletics often involves physical risk, and sometimes those tragic instances when the risk is realized remain hauntingly vivid. Here are a few: Herb Score (1957), Cleveland Indians pitcher: A hard-throwing phenom in the mid-1950s, Score was smashed in the face by a line drive off the bat of the New York Yankees' Gil McDougald.
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NEWS
February 24, 1995
Abused. Depressed. Suicidal. Heroic. Heartthrob. Idol. Outcast. Pariah.How does someone travel from one end of that spectrum to the other?Ask Greg Louganis.Many of the TV viewers who saw his performance in the 1988 Olympics count it among the most courageous feats in sports. Mr. Louganis needed a near-perfect, high-risk dive to come from behind to win the platform competition. And after splitting his skull on the board during a preliminary springboard dive, he went on to win that event, too. The sight of the gold-medaled Olympian, with his bandaged head, clutching a similarly bandaged teddy bear was among the most poignant of those games.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Sun Staff Writer | March 11, 1995
It's a well-trod path by now, the road to best-seller status for the celebrity author: first the exclusive Barbara Walters confessional, then Larry King Live, then Oprah, then a multi-city tour for bookstore signings and interviews with the local media.This time, it's Greg Louganis drawing the cameras and the crowds with his new tell-all, "Breaking the Surface" (Random House, $23), which has shot to the top of best-seller lists just two weeks after hitting the shelves.But underneath the hyperactive, circus-like atmosphere of the modern-day book tour, there is a discomfiting aspect to this one, a sense of sadness that no amount of bright lights and big crowds can change.
SPORTS
By Gil LeBreton and Gil LeBreton,Fort Worth Star-Telegram | February 24, 1995
The tragedy of AIDS keeps lurching out, goading us into paying attention.It doesn't need Barbara Walters to deliver its unhappy news. But I suppose Greg Louganis had his reasons.Judging from the TV excerpts already released, this will not be an easy confession to watch. Louganis' tale digs deeply into his past, from his thoughts of suicide at a young age through his four Olympic gold medals, to his admission of homosexuality to the discovery that he has AIDS.It makes for good television, I suppose.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE and BILL ORDINE,SUN REPORTER | April 6, 2007
Yesterday's death of Darryl Stingley, the former New England Patriots wide receiver who was paralyzed as a result of a brutal hit by the Oakland Raiders' Jack Tatum in a 1978 NFL preseason game, is a reminder that sports isn't always fun and games. Athletics often involves physical risk, and sometimes those tragic instances when the risk is realized remain hauntingly vivid. Here are a few: Herb Score (1957), Cleveland Indians pitcher: A hard-throwing phenom in the mid-1950s, Score was smashed in the face by a line drive off the bat of the New York Yankees' Gil McDougald.
SPORTS
By PHIL JACKMAN | March 1, 1995
The two deadliest known viruses in the world carry the names Marburg and Ebola. The former, named for a town in Germany where it first attacked society, kills one in four people it infects. Ebola, named for a river in Central Africa, is the big guy. It cuts down nine in 10 and doesn't waste time (10 days).Ebola has three subtypes: Ebola Zaire and Ebola Sudan, which figures because these countries have huge sections in the Rain Forest of Africa, and Ebola Reston. Yes, that Reston, the one in Virginia located 25 miles west of Washington.
FEATURES
January 29, 2008
90 John Forsythe Actor 63 Tom Selleck Actor 54 Oprah Winfrey Talk show host 48 Greg Louganis Olympic diver 27 Jonny Lang Blues musician
NEWS
By Derrick Z. Jackson | April 17, 1995
ON HIS DEATHBED, he received 100 telephone calls per hour. More operators had to be hired to handle the load. "We've never had this number of calls, even when Lucille Ball was here, Kirk Douglas or George Burns," said Paula Correia, spokeswoman for Cedars Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. "Never anything like this, ever."One person who visited the dying man said: "It's a real shame. I went to the hospital and saw him, but he was unconscious. He didn't even know I was in the room. It wasn't a pretty sight, man. It was sad . . . I think it's terrible that this happened.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | March 4, 1996
Nate Smith scored 638.20 in the 3-meter dive during the weekend, helping Navy earn third place at the Eastern Swimming and Diving Championship in Cambridge, Mass., the Midshipmen's best finish since 1969.Smith broke the 3-meter school record and a 16-year-old pool record held by Olympian Greg Louganis. He has won the 1- and 3-meter events an unprecedented four straight years.UMBC's men and women placed second to Connecticut at the ECAC championships Saturday night at Glouchester (N.J.) Community College.
SPORTS
By PHIL JACKMAN | March 1, 1995
The two deadliest known viruses in the world carry the names Marburg and Ebola. The former, named for a town in Germany where it first attacked society, kills one in four people it infects. Ebola, named for a river in Central Africa, is the big guy. It cuts down nine in 10 and doesn't waste time (10 days).Ebola has three subtypes: Ebola Zaire and Ebola Sudan, which figures because these countries have huge sections in the Rain Forest of Africa, and Ebola Reston. Yes, that Reston, the one in Virginia located 25 miles west of Washington.
NEWS
February 24, 1995
Abused. Depressed. Suicidal. Heroic. Heartthrob. Idol. Outcast. Pariah.How does someone travel from one end of that spectrum to the other?Ask Greg Louganis.Many of the TV viewers who saw his performance in the 1988 Olympics count it among the most courageous feats in sports. Mr. Louganis needed a near-perfect, high-risk dive to come from behind to win the platform competition. And after splitting his skull on the board during a preliminary springboard dive, he went on to win that event, too. The sight of the gold-medaled Olympian, with his bandaged head, clutching a similarly bandaged teddy bear was among the most poignant of those games.
SPORTS
By Gil LeBreton and Gil LeBreton,Fort Worth Star-Telegram | February 24, 1995
The tragedy of AIDS keeps lurching out, goading us into paying attention.It doesn't need Barbara Walters to deliver its unhappy news. But I suppose Greg Louganis had his reasons.Judging from the TV excerpts already released, this will not be an easy confession to watch. Louganis' tale digs deeply into his past, from his thoughts of suicide at a young age through his four Olympic gold medals, to his admission of homosexuality to the discovery that he has AIDS.It makes for good television, I suppose.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | June 1, 1995
Some of the issues and problems of being young surface in three programs tonight: teen sex, community violence and the custody consequences of divorce.FTC * "In a New Light: Sex Unplugged" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Rosie Perez and Stephen Baldwin are co-hosts of a special about teen health and sexual behavior. Greg Louganis, Melissa Etheridge and model Veronica Webb are among guests discussing topics ranging from abstinence to couples coping with HIV. ABC.* "Street Watch: Youth Voices Count" (8 p.m.-8:30 p.m., MPT, Channels 22, 67)
FEATURES
By Roger Catlin and Roger Catlin,HARTFORD COURANT | July 27, 2004
The first network for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered viewers has unveiled a roster of programming and a start date: Feb. 17. LOGO, the newest digital cable network from MTV Networks - with the motto "different together" - will "reflect the diversity that is our community," said Brian Graden, head of MTV and VH1 entertainment. "We know there is going to be a backlash," says Matt Farber, executive creative consultant for LOGO. "We're prepared and we believe that all we're doing is reflecting an audience that does exist."
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