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By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau | April 1, 1993
BEIJING -- Yan Zhenxue says he once was nothing more than "a money-making machine." But now he has found a special place to paint, to dream and to search for himself among like-minded souls.Until a few years ago, Mr. Yan was a hard-driving manager of an advertising company in the coastal province of Zhejiang."I spent all my time arranging things, giving people presents, taking them to lunch," the 49-year-old artist recalls. "My ego was destroyed. I had to come here to find myself. Here I exist.
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FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | November 26, 2004
NEW YORK - Laren Stover sweeps into Le Gigot, a Greenwich Village bistro, wearing a vintage plaid swing coat and mismatched retro skirt with frothy red blooms that resemble poppies. Dipping into a checkerboard bag, Stover, the author of Bohemian Manifesto: A Field Guide to Living on the Edge (Bulfinch, $19.95), produces a small vessel with a blurry gold and scarlet Florentine design. It is a long-ago find from the Carry-on Shop, a Baltimore thrift store frequented by Stover's grandmother.
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NEWS
By Nina Siegal and Nina Siegal,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 6, 2000
NEW YORK - Behind the landmark Judson Memorial Church, which frames the sky south of Washington Square Park through its ornate campanile, there is a quaint, if somewhat dilapidated, block of mustard and red brick houses. Preservationists say two historic treasures reside on this unassuming Greenwich Village swath: a house where Edgar Allan Poe once lived and a town house renovated by McKim, Mead & White. By the end of the summer, the stretch of four-story to six-story buildings on West Third Street between Thompson and Sullivan Streets will most likely be gone.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 25, 2004
Step into Everyman Theatre these days and you'll find yourself transported to New York's Greenwich Village - more specifically, to a hip nightclub in the late 1960s. Designer Wally Coburn has replaced the theater's usual seats with round tables and bentwood chairs. On stage, a combo of four musicians and four cabaret singers are performing more than two dozen songs in several languages by Belgian songwriter Jacques Brel. A modest revue conceived and translated by Eric Blau and Mort Shuman, Jacques Brel is Alive and Well and Living in Paris introduced Brel's work to American audiences in 1968.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | January 31, 2000
NEW YORK -- Restaurants come and go so quickly here that a first-year anniversary is a milestone to be celebrated under almost any circumstances. But the odds against Peanut Butter & Co. seemed particularly long when it opened in December 1998. The Greenwich Village restaurant serves, well, peanut butter. It has 15-plus varieties of peanut butter sandwiches and five peanut butter-flavored desserts. Fresh-ground peanut butter in various flavors is available to go in 16-ounce jars. The menu features milk and egg creams, not alcohol, usually the big profit item for a restaurant.
NEWS
July 6, 2003
Anthony Dapolito , 82, a community activist who battled for parks and services in Greenwich Village and surrounding areas of New York City for more than half a century, died Wednesday, a day before his 83rd birthday. Mr. Dapolito was the longtime owner of the bakery Vesuvio, which his parents, Neapolitan immigrants, opened in 1920. He delivered bread in a horse-drawn wagon until the family got a truck in 1937. Mr. Dapolito was elected in 1950 to Community Board 2, which represents Greenwich Village and other areas.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joseph C. Koenenn and Joseph C. Koenenn,Newsday | September 1, 1995
The 1995-1996 off-Broadway season has barely begun, and already producers are lining up for the handful of major theaters. Most of those houses are either occupied or already booked for the fall."
NEWS
August 19, 1995
Terry Miller, 47, who turned his love of the theater, his devotion to Greenwich Village and his fondness for obscure facts into an eclectic, though hand-to-mouth, career as a writer, photographer, collector, archivist, researcher and historian, died Tuesday in Manhattan. He was 47.His family said the cause was complications from AIDS.Mr. Miller, who shunned 9-to-5 employment and always struggled to make a living, was essentially a hobbyist of such intensity that his passions became his profession.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | July 16, 1999
"Eyes Wide Shut," the final film of director Stanley Kubrick, presents the late filmmaker's admirers with a tantalizing but ultimately confounding coda to one of the most formidable bodies of work in the cinema.The psychological portrait of a marriage at a pivotal moment, "Eyes Wide Shut" raises some fascinating questions about commitment, intimacy, sexuality and the power of imagination in relationships. And Kubrick's last gasp, which was bound to be a haunting final statement, will surely leave filmgoers with a lingering sense of the mysteries that abound in every emotional transaction.
FEATURES
By Debra K. Minor and Debra K. Minor,Orlando Sentinel | February 26, 1992
The more things change, the more they stay the same. This is certainly true for Peter, Paul and Mary.Three decades ago, the folk trio confronted civil rights and social issues in music they played around New York's Greenwich Village.Today, some of those same issues are being addressed in music they perform as a group and in solo projects."Human-rights issues always top the list in a global sense," Mary Travers said during a phone interview from her Manhattan office. "But under that umbrella, you could put ecology because it certainly is a human right that we have some air to breathe.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison | January 15, 2004
It was when the winter hit -- the steel-gray sky, the sharp, merciless wind -- that I felt the weight of the loneliness. I had just graduated from college and was living in Philadelphia at the time, working for a newspaper there. My mama, my sisters, my best friend, my peeps -- everybody I cared about was back home in Arkansas. I was fine in July, the month I moved to the city. But when that first snow fell and I had to pull out the long johns, the weary blues came knocking. And like a fool, I let 'em in. When they became burdensome, I went to my altar: the stereo.
TRAVEL
By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 23, 2003
There are always plenty of reasons to visit Manhattan -- seeing a Broadway show, touring extraordinary museums or dining in high style being just a few. But let's be honest. As the holiday season approaches, one of the city's chief attractions is world-class shopping. So it's distressing that some of Gotham's most prestigious retail areas -- Rockefeller Center, 57th Street and Soho -- have become crowded of late with the same shops you can find at the local mall. Do you really need to brave New York City to buy something at the Disney Store or the Gap?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Eric R. Danton and Eric R. Danton,Courant Rock Critic | July 17, 2003
The blues sounds easy to play, but Peter Tork knows better. That's right, Peter Tork. Former Monkee, recovering alcoholic. He knows about the blues, despite coming up as a Greenwich Village folkie in the early '60s. "Two things stopped me from playing the blues then," Tork says from his Los Angeles home, before leaving for a tour with his band Shoe Suede Blues that stops Saturday at Baltimore's Mojo Room and Lounge. "One was that half the kids playing the blues were simply imitating the blues.
NEWS
July 6, 2003
Anthony Dapolito , 82, a community activist who battled for parks and services in Greenwich Village and surrounding areas of New York City for more than half a century, died Wednesday, a day before his 83rd birthday. Mr. Dapolito was the longtime owner of the bakery Vesuvio, which his parents, Neapolitan immigrants, opened in 1920. He delivered bread in a horse-drawn wagon until the family got a truck in 1937. Mr. Dapolito was elected in 1950 to Community Board 2, which represents Greenwich Village and other areas.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Helene Stapinski and Helene Stapinski,Special to the Sun | June 29, 2003
Lucia, Lucia, by Adriana Trigiani. Random House. 272 pages. $24.95. Back in 1963, Mary McCarthy changed the world of women's literature with her groundbreaking novel, The Group, about a bunch of smart Vassar girls who are not afraid to discuss their sex lives, birth control and menstruation. Class issues and doubts about marriage were finally put on the kitchen table. Polite girls who kept their terrible secrets to themselves were stuffed in the literary closet where they belonged. Well, times change.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 23, 2001
NEW YORK - Charles Warholic sat in a tattoo parlor in Greenwich Village, patiently watching a man poke a needle under his skin to etch the Statue of Liberty and the number 911 on his right arm. "I want to get something to remember those who died and show my support," said Warholic, 37, still reeling from the sudden, tremendous loss of life at the World Trade Center on Sept. 11. Tattoo parlors across Manhattan have seen a jump in customers asking for American flags, crying eagles and the New York skyline as it was before the terrorist attacks.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Eric R. Danton and Eric R. Danton,Courant Rock Critic | July 17, 2003
The blues sounds easy to play, but Peter Tork knows better. That's right, Peter Tork. Former Monkee, recovering alcoholic. He knows about the blues, despite coming up as a Greenwich Village folkie in the early '60s. "Two things stopped me from playing the blues then," Tork says from his Los Angeles home, before leaving for a tour with his band Shoe Suede Blues that stops Saturday at Baltimore's Mojo Room and Lounge. "One was that half the kids playing the blues were simply imitating the blues.
NEWS
By Cindy Parr and Cindy Parr,Contributing writer | February 1, 1993
The day-to-day ministry that has been a part of the Rev. Frederick Eckhardt's life for more than 40 years will come to an end Feb. 27.After serving the congregation of Grace Lutheran Church in Westminster since 1975, Pastor Eckhardt will officially retire from the pulpit to write, travel and spend time with his family."
NEWS
By Nina Siegal and Nina Siegal,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 6, 2000
NEW YORK - Behind the landmark Judson Memorial Church, which frames the sky south of Washington Square Park through its ornate campanile, there is a quaint, if somewhat dilapidated, block of mustard and red brick houses. Preservationists say two historic treasures reside on this unassuming Greenwich Village swath: a house where Edgar Allan Poe once lived and a town house renovated by McKim, Mead & White. By the end of the summer, the stretch of four-story to six-story buildings on West Third Street between Thompson and Sullivan Streets will most likely be gone.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 28, 2000
"In New York, especially Greenwich Village, down among the cranks and misfits and the one-lungers and might-have-beens and the would-bes and the never-wills and the God-knows-whats ... I have always felt at home." These are the words of Joe Gould, a Boston-born, Harvard-educated son of physicians who moved to New York in 1916 and went on to become a well-known character in Greenwich Village. Gould was the subject of two legendary New Yorker articles written by Joseph Mitchell in the 1940s and 1960s.
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