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By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2000
An Ellicott City activist has demanded that Howard County government officials launch an investigation into the Patapsco Heritage Greenway Committee's use of public funds. Lee Walker Oxenham, a member of the Sierra Club, says the Howard County Department of Recreation and Parks gave the greenway committee $20,000 to produce a feasibility study and master plan for the Patapsco heritage corridor. The group is trying to turn the Patapsco Valley into a certified heritage area. The master plan was produced pro bono by Human and Rohde Inc., documents from the Towson landscape and architecture firm show.
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NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2002
Tracing the history of the Patapsco River Valley was somewhat like trying to solve a mystery for Henry K. Sharp. Searching for clues of vanished communities scattered along the 10-mile stretch of river between Elkridge and Union Dam, he drove all the roads in the area and hiked the trails to find ruins from the 1800s. Then he delved into 19th-century property and deed records, tracing lines of ownership and relying on newspaper clippings, diaries and journals to fill in the gaps. "I walked up and down both sides of the river, stumbling across the remains of a community which was founded when the [Baltimore and Ohio]
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 13, 1999
After more than two hours of discussion, Oella residents voted last night to postpone deciding whether the town should be included in the boundaries of the controversial Patapsco Heritage Greenway.They also voted to set up a meeting with John Slater, chairman of the Greenway Committee, to get more information about the project.About 130 people attended the meeting at the Westchester Community Center in Oella.The next meeting of the Greater Oella Community Association has not been scheduled.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | November 29, 2001
When Bob Chance stands on the shore of the Susquehanna River he can envision a route for hikers and bicyclists to cross the river and connect trails threading through woods, a state park and towns in Harford and Cecil counties. Someday, 38 miles of trails could bind together an area rich with arrowheads, eagles and skipjacks, said Chance, executive director of the Lower Susquehanna Heritage Greenway. The project would also help fill a gap in a system of trails stretching from Maine to Florida.
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | January 20, 1999
A statewide coalition of environmental groups has asked Gov. Parris N. Glendening to halt future funding for a proposed network of nature trails and commercial concessions in the Patapsco River Valley, warning it would hurt the river and Patapsco Valley State Park.The project -- called the Patapsco Heritage Greenway -- is "destructive to the Patapsco River and its watershed," according to a letter given to the governor this week by the Maryland Conservation Council."Despite the fact that the Patapsco Valley State Park is currently over utilized, the Patapsco Heritage Greenway Committee, a private group organized by Oella developer Charles Wagandt, has targeted the Park as the centerpiece of an extensive economic and tourism development plan," the letter said.
NEWS
February 9, 1999
STEPS BEING taken to involve environmentalists in planning the proposed Patapsco Heritage Greenway are, unfortunately, late. Had efforts to reach environmental groups been made when discussions began four years ago, some of the criticism now confronting the proposal might have been allayed. That oversight, however, should not be fatal to a project that could greatly enhance the Patapsco River valley that binds Baltimore and Howard counties.Critics of the proposal must keep in mind that no final decisions have been made.
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | January 20, 1999
A statewide coalition of environmental groups has asked Gov. Parris N. Glendening to halt future funding for a proposed network of nature trails and commercial concessions in the Patapsco River Valley, warning it would hurt the river and Patapsco Valley State Park.The project -- called the Patapsco Heritage Greenway -- is "destructive to the Patapsco River and its watershed," according to a letter given to the governor this week by the Maryland Conservation Council."Despite the fact that the Patapsco Valley State Park is currently over utilized, the Patapsco Heritage Greenway Committee, a private group organized by Oella developer Charles Wagandt, has targeted the park as the centerpiece of an extensive economic and tourism development plan," the letter said.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | October 5, 1998
Hoping to enhance the natural beauty of the Patapsco Valley, a grass-roots organization will unveil three plans today for a trail network that would span historic sites in Baltimore and Howard counties, using the Patapsco River as a centerpiece.The project by Patapsco Heritage Greenway Committee would take about 10 years to complete and is designed to link existing hiking and bicycle trails that meander through Oella, Ellicott City and Catonsville.It would form a living classroom highlighted by landmarks such as the Thomas Viaduct in Relay and remains of rustic textile and flour mills.
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | November 29, 1998
Cathy Hudson and Larry Meyer both love the Patapsco River.She likes to wade in it in the summer, feeling the mud between her toes and looking for the blue crabs that can survive when there hasn't been much rain. He fly-fishes on the weekends, turning over stones to collect and observe aquatic insects.Both want to save the river, and the valley it carved, from encroaching civilization -- but that's where the similarities end.Hudson has helped create a proposal for a trail network -- the Patapsco Heritage Greenway -- that would showcase historical, cultural and natural sites along the river in Baltimore and Howard counties.
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | February 24, 2000
The new chairman of the Patapsco Heritage Greenway Committee doesn't seem daunted by the task before him. Kit Valentine, 58, a Vietnam veteran and retired Army lieutenant colonel, has seen worse things in his life than a controversy over the future of a river valley. Never mind that an Ellicott City activist recently accused the Patapsco Heritage Greenway Committee of misuse of public funds and has demanded an investigation. Never mind that environmentalists have opposed the greenway, arguing that it would bring too many tourists to Patapsco Valley State Park.
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | February 24, 2000
The new chairman of the Patapsco Heritage Greenway Committee doesn't seem daunted by the task before him. Kit Valentine, 58, a Vietnam veteran and retired Army lieutenant colonel, has seen worse things in his life than a controversy over the future of a river valley. Never mind that an Ellicott City activist recently accused the Patapsco Heritage Greenway Committee of misuse of public funds and has demanded an investigation. Never mind that environmentalists have opposed the greenway, arguing that it would bring too many tourists to Patapsco Valley State Park.
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2000
An Ellicott City activist has demanded that Howard County government officials launch an investigation into the Patapsco Heritage Greenway Committee's use of public funds. Lee Walker Oxenham, a member of the Sierra Club, says the Howard County Department of Recreation and Parks gave the greenway committee $20,000 to produce a feasibility study and master plan for the Patapsco heritage corridor. The group is trying to turn the Patapsco Valley into a certified heritage area. The master plan was produced pro bono by Human and Rohde Inc., documents from the Towson landscape and architecture firm show.
NEWS
August 22, 1999
Crabs are sweet, this state's great, don't destroy itI've lived my entire 18 years in Howard County. One of my grandfathers was a dairy farmer; the other was a draftsman for Bethlehem Steel. I believe Ocean City is the only beach in the world, crabs are the sweetest seafood, Baltimore is the greatest city ever created and the Colts will always belong to us.I am a true Marylander to the end. However, lately I can barely stand to drive down the street. All the farms are being destroyed and turned into cookie-cutter homes.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 13, 1999
After more than two hours of discussion, Oella residents voted last night to postpone deciding whether the town should be included in the boundaries of the controversial Patapsco Heritage Greenway.They also voted to set up a meeting with John Slater, chairman of the Greenway Committee, to get more information about the project.About 130 people attended the meeting at the Westchester Community Center in Oella.The next meeting of the Greater Oella Community Association has not been scheduled.
NEWS
April 25, 1999
On homes too close to highwaysThe article in The Sun ("Homes won't get sound barriers," April 18) clearly illustrates why urban sprawl will not be contained until more citizen control is exercised over building decisions in the counties.Although this article discussed a new community in Howard County being built so close to Route 100 that hearing could be damaged, this could represent any county in Maryland.The so-called planning departments are, in fact, building facilitators.Their ties to the building community are too close and deep.
NEWS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | April 21, 1999
Ellicott City businesses should unite if they are to take advantage of economic benefits resulting from a possible Patapsco Heritage Greenway project, a consultant advised them yesterday.Elaine Carmichael, who works for Economic Research Associates and is an adviser for the Patapsco Heritage Greenway Committee, met with the Ellicott City Business Association. The greenway proposal has stirred controversy as opponents worry about the environmental impact of the project that would link towns along the river through a trail network in Baltimore and Howard counties, which includes Patapsco Valley State Park.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | November 29, 2001
When Bob Chance stands on the shore of the Susquehanna River he can envision a route for hikers and bicyclists to cross the river and connect trails threading through woods, a state park and towns in Harford and Cecil counties. Someday, 38 miles of trails could bind together an area rich with arrowheads, eagles and skipjacks, said Chance, executive director of the Lower Susquehanna Heritage Greenway. The project would also help fill a gap in a system of trails stretching from Maine to Florida.
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | January 22, 1999
In an attempt to make the proposed Patapsco Heritage Greenway more palatable to a wider number of people, the new chairman of the planning committee pledged yesterday to work more closely with environmentalists and residents concerned about Patapsco Valley State Park."
NEWS
March 28, 1999
Greenway panel has foundation's full supportThe Ellicott City Restoration Foundation Inc. has endorsed and supported the Patapsco Heritage Greenway Committee from its inception. The committee was, in fact, formed by the foundation.The Restoration Foundation is an all-volunteer board made up of representatives from the business community as well as property owners and liaisons from the following government and non-profit preservation and promotional groups: Howard County Historical Society, Friends of the Patapsco Female Institute, Howard County Tourism Council, Historic Ellicott City, Inc., Ellicott City Business Association, and Howard County departments of planning and zoning, public works and recreation and parks.
NEWS
February 9, 1999
STEPS BEING taken to involve environmentalists in planning the proposed Patapsco Heritage Greenway are, unfortunately, late. Had efforts to reach environmental groups been made when discussions began four years ago, some of the criticism now confronting the proposal might have been allayed. That oversight, however, should not be fatal to a project that could greatly enhance the Patapsco River valley that binds Baltimore and Howard counties.Critics of the proposal must keep in mind that no final decisions have been made.
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