Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGreenpeace
IN THE NEWS

Greenpeace

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | February 7, 2012
There's a new ship in the harbor - at least for another day.  Rainbow Warrior III, the signature vessel of Greenpeace, cruised into Baltimore Monday on its maiden voyage to the United States.  It's the third ship to bear that name - the first was allegedly bombed by the French Navy in 1985, and its successor was retired last August.  This 190-foot baby was designed and built to the environmental group's specs, and they say it's the...
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 3, 2013
To the age-old question of how many conservatives does it take to screw in a light bulb, we now have a definitive answer: Just one, but it will take him weeks to chase down a vintage incandescent bulb because he won't touch an energy-efficient one. At least that's the obvious conclusion to draw from a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The study, put together by researchers from Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania and Duke University's Fuqua School of Business, asked hundreds of people to pass judgment on light bulb options.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 10, 1995
Dozens of French navy commandos storm a Greenpeace ship in the South Pacific to thwart an attempt to land protesters on an island where France plans to resume nuclear tests. The crew of Rainbow Warrior II, taken into custody, then freed 10 hours later, was attempting to call attention to French plans to set off eight nuclear test blasts. Page 3A
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | February 7, 2012
There's a new ship in the harbor - at least for another day.  Rainbow Warrior III, the signature vessel of Greenpeace, cruised into Baltimore Monday on its maiden voyage to the United States.  It's the third ship to bear that name - the first was allegedly bombed by the French Navy in 1985, and its successor was retired last August.  This 190-foot baby was designed and built to the environmental group's specs, and they say it's the...
NEWS
By Kay Withers and Kay Withers,Special to The Sun | October 12, 1990
WARSAW, Poland -- The environmental organization Greenpeace accused the West yesterday of exploiting Poland's recently opened borders to dump huge quantities of toxic waste.Greenpeace activists called on the Polish authorities to protest vociferously to the governments involved.A Greenpeace report, released simultaneously in Warsaw and Brussels, Belgium, said the Poles had been "swiftly rewarded" for opening their borders to Western industry.The 45-page study detailed 63 cases of attempts by Western countries in the last two years to foist hazardous wastes on Poland.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | August 9, 1992
The U.S. Army and Greenpeace ended a community meeting Monday by agreeing to disagree on what to do with the military's aging stockpile of mustard agent.To the Army, plans to incinerate mustard agent should proceed until another method of disposal is available, although it could take a decade or more before such technology is developed.But to Greenpeace, any of the possible alternatives would be preferable to incineration, and it may be better to wait for the methods to be developed.Representatives of the Army and Greenpeace met at the session sponsored by the Committee for National Security, a Washington-based educational organization that works to inform the public on arms control and national security issues.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | December 27, 1995
The Moby Dick, the only ship in operation that is owned by Greenpeace -- the international environmental group -- is spending the holidays docked in Fells Point while its crew awaits instructions on its next mission.The ship, a converted 83-foot side trawler built in the Netherlands in 1959, arrived in Baltimore on Dec. 3 from New Bedford, Mass. It is working its way south after spending the summer and fall on a tour of the Great Lakes to warn of the harmful effects of toxic and radioactive pollution on humans and wildlife.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | August 11, 2001
A unique kind of tall ship has just sailed into town: Greenpeace's Rainbow Warrior, famed for its seagoing confrontations with whalers, nuclear weapons testers and boatloads of toxic trash. The international environmental group is celebrating 30 years of "raising hell to save the planet," as its motto proclaims, but the Greenpeace crew is not planning to scale any downtown skyscrapers or plug any factory outfall pipes during the ship's five-day Inner Harbor stay. Instead the three-masted schooner, its green hull emblazoned with rainbows and doves, is on a five-month East Coast goodwill cruise.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | July 23, 2005
Greenpeace has launched flotillas of seafaring activists to save whales in the Arctic Ocean and frustrate nuclear bomb testing in the Pacific. Today, the international environmental action group plans to send protesters in boats with a more humble goal: saving the Chesapeake Bay's population of a cigar-sized bait fish called menhaden. Organizers of the 34-year-old Amsterdam-based organization say they are set to send about 50 people with a giant floating fish skeleton and signs reading "Floating factory fishing is overkill" in 15 boats beside a Reedville, Va., menhaden processing plant.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,STAFF WRITER | December 29, 1995
The Moby Dick looks quite at home moored in Fells Point on a glittery winter morning. The bow of the 83-foot Dutch trawler, overhauled by the international environmental group Greenpeace, is brightly striped and graced with a benign whale that bears little resemblance to the ship's malevolent namesake.On board, Greenpeace's six-member international crew relaxes between missions. These are the eco-buccaneers who have made Greenpeace legendary for its bold guerrilla tactics. They are people unfazed by spending months and years away from home, bunking in close quarters, living with uncertainty and risk.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Evan Haga, Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2011
For English Beat singer, guitarist and songwriter Dave Wakeling, the phrase "put your money where your mouth is" could be a mantra. Case in point: His band's stop at Bourbon Street this Saturday is one of select dates on his current tour that offers an admission discount for the unemployed. That's right: Fans with a current unemployment letter to show at the door can purchase half-price tickets online. Wakeling, who turns 55 next month, talked to many fans who'd lost work and saw a striking similarity between the turmoil-ridden England that birthed the Beat — later called the English Beat in the U.S. — and the America he calls home today.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | May 29, 2009
Maryland emitted more cumulative global warming pollution between 1960 and 2005 than more than 150 other nations surveyed, according to a report released this week by Greenpeace. And that makes it one of the least-polluting states on a per-person basis. The United States has long been considered the chief emitter, but months ahead of a global forum on the subject, the environmental organization was seeking to underscore the level by compiling Department of Energy statistics for individual states and comparing them with World Resource Institute data from 184 other countries.
NEWS
By CAROL J. WILLIAMS and CAROL J. WILLIAMS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 21, 2006
FRIGATE BAY, St. Kitts and Nevis -- Greenpeace activists went ashore yesterday in motorized rubber boats to plant cardboard tombstones on the beach in protest of the killing of nearly 2,000 whales a year despite a global ban on commercial whaling. St. Kitts police, armed with tear gas and machine guns, quickly arrested the 10 activists, although the protest was peaceful. The demonstration was aimed at spotlighting what Japan says is whaling for scientific research and the support that Tokyo has won from smaller countries here at the International Whaling Commission's annual meeting.
SPORTS
August 14, 2005
THE MINUTE they showed up at the Annapolis hearing on the proposed cap on commercial menhaden fishing, it was clear Greenpeace members would change the tenor of the debate. Goodbye, Andrea Bocelli. Hello, Luciano Pavarotti. No offense to the gentle folks who have been fighting the good fight for years, but Greenpeace knows how to wage a robust, bare-knuckles public war against a bully. On Wednesday, the regulatory board that oversees Atlantic Coast fish will vote on whether to limit the commercial menhaden industry in the Chesapeake Bay while scientists figure out why the menhaden population is crashing.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | July 23, 2005
Greenpeace has launched flotillas of seafaring activists to save whales in the Arctic Ocean and frustrate nuclear bomb testing in the Pacific. Today, the international environmental action group plans to send protesters in boats with a more humble goal: saving the Chesapeake Bay's population of a cigar-sized bait fish called menhaden. Organizers of the 34-year-old Amsterdam-based organization say they are set to send about 50 people with a giant floating fish skeleton and signs reading "Floating factory fishing is overkill" in 15 boats beside a Reedville, Va., menhaden processing plant.
NEWS
May 4, 2005
Bob Hunter, 63, a Canadian who co-founded Greenpeace and used his experience as a journalist to turn the environmental group's fight to an international cause, died Monday in Toronto of prostate cancer, the organization said. Mr. Hunter, a columnist for the Vancouver Sun in the 1960s and most recently an ecology broadcaster for Canadian news media, first came to prominence in 1971 with the launch of Greenpeace and its protests against nuclear testing. He brought public attention to the hunting of whales and seals, as well as the dumping of toxic waste into the oceans.
NEWS
October 18, 2003
Ben Metcalfe, 83, a founding member of Greenpeace, died of a heart attack Tuesday in Toronto. Mr. Metcalfe, the first chairman of the Greenpeace Foundation, was drawn to its style of environmental activism while reporting on the "Don't Make a Wave" committee protesting nuclear testing by the United States at Amchitka Island, Alaska, in 1971. The protest group became Greenpeace, and 30 years later, it had grown to 2.5 million members in 27 countries, according to its Internet site.
NEWS
By PHILIP TERZIAN | July 17, 1995
Washington -- Few events in the news have pleased me as much as the French seizure of the Greenpeace vessel, Rainbow Warrior II, in the waters off Mururoa atoll, in the South Pacific.The fact that the deed was done on the 10th anniversary of the French destruction of the Rainbow Warrior I -- a coincidence that horrified television correspondents, leading to innumerable candle-light vigils -- made it all the more pleasurable.The French have a certain way of doing things, to be sure. As a democratic ally, France can be (and often is)
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | March 9, 2004
Twenty years ago, Stephen McAllister and his crew of Greenpeace activists put on their hazmat suits and sailed into a Curtis Bay creek to block a chemical company's waste-discharge pipe. On a recent afternoon, the Charles County developer returned to that site, stepping out of his Jaguar and through the jagged hole in the industrial yard's rusty fence. He walked past barrels of waste, cast-off boats and mangled car parts to reach the creek. The waste pipe and the chemical company are long gone, but the creek bed is still there, filled with flowing sewage.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.