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NEWS
By Abu Moulta Ali | July 31, 2008
If you were told by the city that a homeless shelter was planned for your neighborhood, you would probably react the way our neighborhood did and organize, or the way Butchers Hill and the communities around Edmondson-Westside High School are reacting, with concerns and a lot of questions for the city. Last winter, Greenmount West hosted a 300-bed "code blue" winter homeless shelter. We are a small community of 500 families in the Station North Arts and Entertainment District. The New Greenmount West Community Association held community-wide meetings and created a list of commitments residents wanted from the city regarding the operation of the shelter.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2013
A 10-inch water main has broken in East Baltimore, disrupting water service to about 15 homes, two apartment buildings and a third building, according to the city Department of Public Works. The break occurred in the 400 block of E. Oliver St. in the city's Greenmount West neighborhood, the department said. The street is also closed. "It knocked a nice little hole in the street, so we're digging that up now," said Kurt Kocher, a DPW spokesman, about 2:30 p.m. Kocher said he did not have an estimate for when the damage would be repaired.
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NEWS
June 25, 2009
New York's Lower East Side was a run-down neighborhood blighted by crime and decay before young artists began moving in during the 1970s and turned the place into a lively entertainment destination. An infusion of creative types in the 1990s transformed Washington's distressed U Street corridor into a dynamic cultural hub. Now Baltimore is aiming to engineer a similar urban renaissance in the long-beleaguered Greenmount West neighborhood, which forms the eastern half of the city's fledgling Station North Arts and Entertainment District.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 22, 2013
Baltimore is your unpredictable uncle in a bathrobe - sweet one minute, grouchy the next; as kind as an old friar today, as menacing as a hit man tomorrow. This town will baffle you. It is sane and insane, charming and ugly, cosmopolitan and puny, brilliant and middling, future thinking and stuck in its ways. Maybe every city is like this, particularly those with lingering violent crime. Every city with lingering violent crime probably has an old-school bakery or a revered deli where you can still get amazing smoked herring.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Sun Staff Writer | May 21, 1994
As she makes her way through her tiny Greenmount West community, Dorothy Johnson passes once-elegant homes on some streets and treads over glass-strewn paths on others, in a neighborhood that flickers with hope but is marked with decay.Pointing this way and that, she rattles off the features that attracted her here from Baltimore County four years ago: the solid housing stock, the proximity to downtown, the vibrant city life.Then she lists the things that one day may drive her away: trash that is dumped in an alley next to her home, young men who sit idly on the steps and drugs sold openly on the street.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2010
A 21-year-old man who sources said had been interviewed as a witness to a weekend homicide was fatally shot early Thursday in Baltimore's Station North district, according to police. The victim, who was not identified pending notification of his next of kin, was a witness to a killing that occurred Saturday night in the 300 block of E. Lafayette Ave. in the Greenmount West neighborhood, multiple sources told The Baltimore Sun. One source said the man had been inside an apartment when 24-year-old Justin Kendrick was fatally stabbed.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2002
Baltimore's decision not to sell a vacant school in the renewal area around Pennsylvania Station, even though three developers are eager to recycle it, has drawn sharply divergent reactions from community leaders working to turn the area into the city's next arts and entertainment district. The property that was taken off the market, the former Mildred D. Monroe Elementary School at 1600 Guilford Ave., is one of three for which the city housing department sought bids in the fall. When city school officials disclosed this month that they want to reopen the school for a diagnostic center for 50 to 75 pupils, though they closed it last year, the housing department rescinded its offer to sell the school.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,Sun reporter | October 25, 2007
The city's plans to relocate and expand its winter shelter for the homeless has run into opposition from a neighborhood group that is threatening legal action to block the plan. Members of the New Greenmount West Community Association say they are upset that city officials didn't take more time to meet with them and discuss plans to create a temporary winter shelter for as many as 300 men, women and children in an old school in the 1600 block of Guilford Ave. Residents had hoped that the school - which is empty and has been picked apart by vandals - would become the new home of a Jesuit school, an addition that would help to revitalize Greenmount West, which is looking for a boost from the adjacent Station North Arts and Entertainment District.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Liz Bowie and Erika Niedowski and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | March 15, 2001
Deciding to shut the doors at nine Baltimore schools is one thing. Getting it done is quite another, when it involves moving 2,400 displaced students to 18 other schools. Yesterday, school officials began tending to a host of questions, ranging from how to console a fourth-grader fearful of change to how to clear drug dealers from the routes children will take to their new schools. "The hard work now begins," said school board Chairman J. Tyson Tildon. Faced with shrinking enrollment and underused buildings, the nine-member board voted Tuesday to close seven schools in June at a savings of $1.3 million initially and an additional $2 million in subsequent years.
NEWS
By From staff reports | November 11, 2002
In Baltimore City Francis Scott Key pupils to send names into orbit Pupils from Francis Scott Key Elementary/Middle School hope to have their names among the stars today. The space shuttle Endeavour, scheduled for launch today on a trip to the International Space Station, will be carrying pupil signatures from more than 500 schools in the United States, Canada and eight other countries. Francis Scott Key was the only Baltimore school chosen to participate. The pupils signed posters as part of Student Signatures in Space, an educational program that allows elementary and middle school children the opportunity to send their digitized signatures into space and to feel a personal involvement with the mission.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | March 30, 2012
You smell damp masonry as you approach the old factory atop the Jones Falls Valley just above downtown Baltimore. The restoration and conversion of the old Lebow Brothers garment manufacturing plant into a new $25 million Baltimore Design School is now five months in the making. Open to the elements since the mid-1980s, it still reeks of abandonment. But that changes by the day. It's a remarkable project in a lightly visited section of the Station North Arts and Entertainment District and the part of Baltimore known as Greenmount West.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2010
Late Thursday morning, the green plastic lawn chair kept its vigil in front of a Formstone rowhouse on East Lafayette Avenue. Cops had taken down the yellow crime scene tape. The coroner had taken away the body. But the chair where the young man had been found slumped over with a bullet in his head remained, long into the humid day. A splotch of blood marred the seat. Neighbors shook their heads when asked if they knew the victim. They shrugged their shoulders when asked why nobody had taken away the chair.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2010
A 21-year-old man who sources said had been interviewed as a witness to a weekend homicide was fatally shot early Thursday in Baltimore's Station North district, according to police. The victim, who was not identified pending notification of his next of kin, was a witness to a killing that occurred Saturday night in the 300 block of E. Lafayette Ave. in the Greenmount West neighborhood, multiple sources told The Baltimore Sun. One source said the man had been inside an apartment when 24-year-old Justin Kendrick was fatally stabbed.
NEWS
June 25, 2009
New York's Lower East Side was a run-down neighborhood blighted by crime and decay before young artists began moving in during the 1970s and turned the place into a lively entertainment destination. An infusion of creative types in the 1990s transformed Washington's distressed U Street corridor into a dynamic cultural hub. Now Baltimore is aiming to engineer a similar urban renaissance in the long-beleaguered Greenmount West neighborhood, which forms the eastern half of the city's fledgling Station North Arts and Entertainment District.
BUSINESS
April 14, 2009
Bond Transfer files for bankruptcy Bond Transfer Co. Inc., a 61-year-old, family-owned trucking business in Baltimore, has filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy protection, listing $3.3 million in debts and $220,000 in assets. Company officials could not be reached Monday. Under Chapter 7, businesses typically shut down and liquidate assets. The company's Web site says it employs about 100 drivers who operate about 90 tractors and 275 trailers. The business specialized in next-day deliveries to metro areas including New York and Philadelphia.
NEWS
By Abu Moulta Ali | July 31, 2008
If you were told by the city that a homeless shelter was planned for your neighborhood, you would probably react the way our neighborhood did and organize, or the way Butchers Hill and the communities around Edmondson-Westside High School are reacting, with concerns and a lot of questions for the city. Last winter, Greenmount West hosted a 300-bed "code blue" winter homeless shelter. We are a small community of 500 families in the Station North Arts and Entertainment District. The New Greenmount West Community Association held community-wide meetings and created a list of commitments residents wanted from the city regarding the operation of the shelter.
BUSINESS
April 14, 2009
Bond Transfer files for bankruptcy Bond Transfer Co. Inc., a 61-year-old, family-owned trucking business in Baltimore, has filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy protection, listing $3.3 million in debts and $220,000 in assets. Company officials could not be reached Monday. Under Chapter 7, businesses typically shut down and liquidate assets. The company's Web site says it employs about 100 drivers who operate about 90 tractors and 275 trailers. The business specialized in next-day deliveries to metro areas including New York and Philadelphia.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,Sun reporter | October 25, 2007
The city's plans to relocate and expand its winter shelter for the homeless has run into opposition from a neighborhood group that is threatening legal action to block the plan. Members of the New Greenmount West Community Association say they are upset that city officials didn't take more time to meet with them and discuss plans to create a temporary winter shelter for as many as 300 men, women and children in an old school in the 1600 block of Guilford Ave. Residents had hoped that the school - which is empty and has been picked apart by vandals - would become the new home of a Jesuit school, an addition that would help to revitalize Greenmount West, which is looking for a boost from the adjacent Station North Arts and Entertainment District.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | February 1, 2004
Baltimore was a factory town the last time somebody set down rules for what could be built in this city and where. Luxury housing was not gobbling up waterfront industrial sites. There were no cell phone towers to plant, no group homes next to private homes. Neighborhoods had pubs, not rollicking bars for college kids. And the first off-key strains of karaoke were safely off shore. Thirty-three years and countless social, economic and technological changes later, it's time to update Baltimore's zoning, say city planning officials.
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