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By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 17, 2000
KANGERLUSSUAQ, Greenland - With bottled-water sales rising worldwide, Greenland's ice is again being eyed as a potentially profitable resource. Jacob Evar of Copenhagen, whose empire includes pita bread and a retirement village in France among other things, has embarked on a campaign to capture melting glacier water and sell it in Greenland and abroad. Evar and other backers of the Greenland Water company - now more concept than reality - point out that 20 percent of the world's drinking water reserves are encased in the icecap that covers 85 percent of the world's largest island, exclusive of Australia.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2014
While most of the continental United States shivered amid the "polar vortex" last month, globally, it was the fourth-warmest January on record and warmest since 2007. The average temperature was 1.17 degrees above the 20th century average of 53.6 degrees, according to the National Climatic Data Center's State of the Climate report. The average temperature just over land was 2.11 degrees above average, at 37 degrees. While cold temperatures dominated the eastern U.S., the warmest temperature anomalies occurred in Alaska, Greenland and eastern China and Russia, according to the report.
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NEWS
By Bryn Nelson and Bryn Nelson,NEWSDAY | April 8, 2004
The rise of worldwide carbon dioxide emissions could virtually eliminate Greenland's massive ice-sheet and swamp coastal communities with 23 feet of sea water in as little as 1,000 years, according to a climate modeling study by a trio of European researchers. At that height, oceans would likely cover much of low-lying areas such as Florida, Bangladesh and the Netherlands. A permanent loss of the ice cover on Greenland could be triggered by a rise in the island's average year-round temperature of 5.4 degrees Fahrenheit or more, the study suggests, an effect precipitated by increasing emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases into the atmosphere.
NEWS
By FROM SUN NEWS SERVICES | November 25, 2008
Former Biden aide chosen for Senate seat WILMINGTON, Del. : Edward Kaufman, a former aide to Sen. Joe Biden, was named yesterday by Delaware Gov. Ruth Ann Minner to fill the Senate seat Biden is leaving for the vice presidency. Kaufman is president of a political and management consulting firm based in Wilmington. He served on Biden's Senate staff 1973-1994, including 19 years as chief of staff. He is an advisory board member to President-elect Barack Obama's transition team. Speculation on Biden's successor had centered in recent weeks on his son, Attorney General Beau Biden.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 26, 1993
Lead deposits, which accumulated in Greenland's soil and snow during the 1960s and 1970s, were primarily the result of leaded gasoline emissions originating in the United States, according to a study published in the journal Nature.In the 20 years that the Clean Air Act has mandated unleaded gas use in the United States, the lead accumulation worldwide has diminished significantly, but the Nature study shows that airborne leaded gas emissions from the United States were the leading contributor to the high concentration of lead in the snow in Greenland.
FEATURES
By Liam Pleven and Liam Pleven,NEWSDAY | January 5, 1997
There we were, floating around in a pool of geothermally heated, 85-degree water, contemplating just how far we had traveled from anyplace even remotely familiar.We had stripped to our bathing suits in air that was 40 degrees, at best, in the company of Danish tourists who, like us, were taking a break from the coldness by basking in the local hot springs.But what made the scene so surreal was feeling the warmth all around us while at the same time gazing out over outstretched toes and seeing massive icebergs gently bobbing by in the nearby fjord.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 5, 2000
PITUFFIK, Greenland - In an icebound land with one person for every 15 square miles and no industry to have blighted the backdrop of icebergs and emerald glaciers, one would hardly expect to stumble upon a ghost town. Here, on a mossy saddle of rock overlooking a frozen bay of breathtaking beauty, stand two dozen sturdy wooden houses, a handful of sod hovels and a graveyard, all silent testimony to a cultural trespass a half-century ago. This was the northernmost hunting village of Greenland's indigenous people until Denmark consigned it to U.S. authorities for the Thule Air Base in 1951, when this vast Arctic island was subject to Danish colonial rule and the Inuit were regarded as a backward society blocking progress.
NEWS
By Cynthia Dockrell and Cynthia Dockrell,BOSTON GLOBE | March 16, 1997
Before you get so fed up with the capriciousness of March that you flee south, read the cover story in this month's Harper's. You'll never complain about winter again.Gretel Ehrlich writes an arresting first-person report of her winter Greenland, where the sun disappears for months. Temperatures drop way below zero and stay there. Dogs, which provide the primary mode of transportation, outnumber humansby an impressive margin, and a sled maker talks rapturously about trees -- though he uses their wood, he's never seen one growing in treeless Greenland.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 17, 2006
Greenland's vast glaciers are dumping ice into the ocean three times faster than they did 10 years ago because of higher temperatures, suggesting that sea level could rise even more quickly than current projections. The study, published today in the journal Science, found that the glaciers contributed 53 cubic miles of water to the Atlantic Ocean in 2005, resulting in about a 0.02-inch rise in sea level. "The models we had were not terribly alarming about Greenland," said Richard Alley, a glaciologist at Penn State University who was not involved in the research.
NEWS
August 23, 1993
1993 Catfish Tournament runs through Sept. 12The 1993 Catfish Tournament, sponsored by the Pasadena Sportfishing Group and the Fish-n-Barrell tackle shop, will run through 5 p.m. Sept. 12.Fish caught anywhere are eligible, and six prizes will be awarded.For more information, call 255-3678 or 544-4867.Man, 27, dies while working on boatA 27-year-old man died Wednesday as he worked on a boat at Jack's Marine Service in Greenland Beach, police reported.Brian Joseph Rutkowski, of the 8400 block Miramar Road, slipped under the water as he washed the boat at the marina in the 400 block of Greenland Beach Road about 5:30 p.m., police said.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,Sun reporter | August 2, 2007
They wanted spectacular mountains in a cool climate. They got the airport Hilton during one of Baltimore's most sweltering stretches. About 20 people have been holed up since Monday in rooms paid for by Air Greenland, which canceled their flight to Kangerlussuaq on the country's western border for mechanical reasons and didn't have another scheduled until today. They are among the latest victims of the summer travel season that has produced some record delays and cancellations and an untold number of passengers who couldn't readily rebook because planes are sold out or, in Air Greenland's case, not offered every day. Northwest Airlines has canceled hundreds of flights recently because of a pilot shortage, and many other carriers have gotten off schedule because of bad weather.
BUSINESS
By MEREDITH COHN and MEREDITH COHN,SUN REPORTER | July 25, 2006
For those tired of summer heat, the Arctic may soon be just a few hours away. Greenland's national airline, Air Greenland A.S., has applied to the U.S. government for clearance to fly between the globe's icy northern reaches and Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport. If approved, it would be the first direct flight between the countries. To get to Greenland now, U.S. travelers have to connect through Denmark, Iceland or Canada, according to travel agents. And that is hampering the country's effort to lure some of the same adventurous - and well-outfitted - American tourists who found Iceland years ago and are looking for the next unbeaten path.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 17, 2006
Greenland's vast glaciers are dumping ice into the ocean three times faster than they did 10 years ago because of higher temperatures, suggesting that sea level could rise even more quickly than current projections. The study, published today in the journal Science, found that the glaciers contributed 53 cubic miles of water to the Atlantic Ocean in 2005, resulting in about a 0.02-inch rise in sea level. "The models we had were not terribly alarming about Greenland," said Richard Alley, a glaciologist at Penn State University who was not involved in the research.
NEWS
December 5, 2005
On December 4, 2005 MARIE CATHERINE (nee Bowers) beloved wife of the late Anthony Coons; devoted mother of John A. Coons and his wife Florence and Barbara Greenland (Chester, VA) and her husband, Denis; dear grandmother of The Rev. Michael J. Coons, Kevin W. Coons, Michele Holland and Denise Coles; sister of Regina Ferguson, Margaret V. Matschulat and Franklin Bowers; also survived by 4 great-grandchildren. Visiting at the E. F. Lassahn Funeral Home, P.A., 11750 Bel Air Road (Kingsville)
NEWS
June 24, 2005
Maria F. Schlicht, a former housekeeper and longtime Greenland Beach resident, died of heart failure Wednesday at Cranberry Cottage, a Glen Burnie assisted-living facility. She was 98. Maria Jaeger was born and raised in Bruchsal, Germany, and in 1927 immigrated to St. Louis, where she became a housekeeper for August A. Busch Sr., president of Anheuser-Busch Inc. After moving to Baltimore in 1929, she continued working as a housekeeper until 1938. She was married in 1931 to Otto F. Schlicht, also a German immigrant, who for 40 years had captained U.S. Public Health Service tugboats berthed at the old quarantine station at Hawkins Point.
NEWS
By Bryn Nelson and Bryn Nelson,NEWSDAY | April 8, 2004
The rise of worldwide carbon dioxide emissions could virtually eliminate Greenland's massive ice-sheet and swamp coastal communities with 23 feet of sea water in as little as 1,000 years, according to a climate modeling study by a trio of European researchers. At that height, oceans would likely cover much of low-lying areas such as Florida, Bangladesh and the Netherlands. A permanent loss of the ice cover on Greenland could be triggered by a rise in the island's average year-round temperature of 5.4 degrees Fahrenheit or more, the study suggests, an effect precipitated by increasing emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases into the atmosphere.
NEWS
June 24, 2005
Maria F. Schlicht, a former housekeeper and longtime Greenland Beach resident, died of heart failure Wednesday at Cranberry Cottage, a Glen Burnie assisted-living facility. She was 98. Maria Jaeger was born and raised in Bruchsal, Germany, and in 1927 immigrated to St. Louis, where she became a housekeeper for August A. Busch Sr., president of Anheuser-Busch Inc. After moving to Baltimore in 1929, she continued working as a housekeeper until 1938. She was married in 1931 to Otto F. Schlicht, also a German immigrant, who for 40 years had captained U.S. Public Health Service tugboats berthed at the old quarantine station at Hawkins Point.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Staff Writer | September 17, 1993
A 26-year-old construction worker was sentenced to a year in jail yesterday for his part in a fistfight last year at a Greenland Beach tavern in which his 44-year-old opponent was killed.James F. Walton Jr. of the 200 block of Greenland Beach Road, Greenland Beach, was sentenced yesterday by Judge Raymond Thieme, Jr., who agreed to suspend all but the seven months Mr. Walton has spent in the county Detention Center awaiting trial.According to court records, Mr. Walton was at Cap'n Bucks tavern on the 8100 block of Fort Smallwood Road at about 1:30 a.m. when he agreed to "step outside" after being challenged to a fight by Michael Dwayne Miles of Glen Burnie.
NEWS
By Marla Cone and Marla Cone,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 20, 2004
QAANAAQ, Greenland - Pitching a makeshift tent on the sea ice, where the Arctic Ocean meets the North Atlantic, brothers Mamarut and Gedion Kristiansen are ready to savor their favorite meal. Nearby lies the carcass of a narwhal, a reclusive beast with an ivory tusk like a unicorn's. Mamarut slices off a piece of muktuk, the whale's raw pink blubber and mottled gray skin, as a snack. Peqqinnartoq, he says in Greenlandic. Healthy food. Mamarut's wife, Tukummeq Peary, a descendant of famed North Pole explorer Robert E. Peary, is boiling the main entree on a camp stove.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 5, 2000
PITUFFIK, Greenland - In an icebound land with one person for every 15 square miles and no industry to have blighted the backdrop of icebergs and emerald glaciers, one would hardly expect to stumble upon a ghost town. Here, on a mossy saddle of rock overlooking a frozen bay of breathtaking beauty, stand two dozen sturdy wooden houses, a handful of sod hovels and a graveyard, all silent testimony to a cultural trespass a half-century ago. This was the northernmost hunting village of Greenland's indigenous people until Denmark consigned it to U.S. authorities for the Thule Air Base in 1951, when this vast Arctic island was subject to Danish colonial rule and the Inuit were regarded as a backward society blocking progress.
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