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Tim Wheeler | February 9, 2012
Maryland is on track to reduce climate-altering greenhouse gases 25 percent by the end of the decade, according to a state environmental official. In a preview of the state's overdue plan to curb emissions of carbon dioxide and methane, George S. "Tad" Aburn Jr., head of air management for the state Department of the Environment , told members of the House Environmental Matters Committee Wednesday that Maryland should exceed the goal set in a 2009 law if all 65 control programs laid out in the draft blueprint work as planned.
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NEWS
September 11, 2014
If increasingly extreme weather events around the world weren't alarming enough, the latest monitoring by the World Meteorological Organization shows last year was the worst ever for rising levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Their report released Tuesday demonstrates why efforts to curb climate change deserve to be a top priority for U.S. foreign policy. The WMO tracks not just the greenhouse gases emitted by power plants, motor vehicles, factories and other major contributors but what the net effect is on the atmosphere since a certain amount of carbon dioxide is naturally absorbed by plants and oceans.
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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Staff Writer | May 31, 1992
Global warming. The words themselves conjure up beads of sweat. Is Mother Nature getting a fever? Can she survive it? Can we afford the cure?Leaders from 160 nations are flying to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, this week to take the planet's temperature at the United Nations Conference on the Environment and Development, better known as the Earth Summit.Top on the agenda of the 12-day session is a treaty that would pledge world leaders to avert a global warm-up by curbing emissions of so-called "greenhouse gases," chiefly carbon dioxide.
NEWS
November 9, 2013
I thank The Sun for the recent commentary on fracking, which takes a position on the science rather than the economics ( "Hydrofracking risks outweigh rewards," Oct. 31). It explains the very real dangers of earthquakes and persistent ecological damage. It ends by stating that fracking companies should be accountable in dollars for these problems, which will exist long after a well is capped. In addition, the author calls on federal and state government to be rigorous in applying regulations.
NEWS
December 3, 1997
DELEGATES from more than 150 nations are gathered in Kyoto, Japan, to cap two years of technical work with a ringing and binding call for reductions in greenhouse gases -- notably carbon dioxide from fossil fuels -- to reverse global warming. They may not make it.Broadly speaking, the nations are grouped in two camps. The United States is in neither. If the conference fails to produce agreement, the U.S. is likely to be cast as villain. If a compromise is brokered that produces a treaty that would bring results and pass Senate ratification, the U.S. would emerge as unlikely hero.
NEWS
December 13, 1997
THE INTERNATIONAL agreement on global warming represents an environmental milestone, with the first legal obligations of the industrialized world to reduce heat-trapping fossil fuel emissions.While troublesome details remain to be resolved, and ultimate ratification of the treaty by the more than 150 participating nations is uncertain, the accord gets the world moving in the right direction to address potentially serious climatic change.The United States finally committed itself to a target of 7 percent reduction of greenhouse gases from 1990 levels; other industrialized countries have similar targets under the agreement that was two years in the making.
NEWS
October 13, 1996
THE BALTIMORE ORIOLE evicted from Maryland's woodlands by the ravages of global warming? Sounds like a story from the supermarket tabloids, but it is the latest warning from the World Wildlife Fund about the catastrophic climatic and habitat changes in store for the planet if man-made greenhouse gases go unchecked.The immediate cause for such alarm is an effort to persuade the U.S. and other nations to agree to binding international limits on the burning of fossil fuels that produce carbon dioxide, which accumulates in the upper atmosphere and traps heat that warms the Earth.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | November 30, 2006
WASHINGTON -- In sharp debate yesterday before the U.S. Supreme Court, states and environmental groups urged the justices to require that the Bush administration regulate greenhouse gases from new vehicles in an effort to slow global warming. The case, in which Baltimore joined Massachusetts and 11 other states to sue the Environmental Protection Agency, is the first on global warming to reach the high court. Lawyers argued yesterday that the consequences of inaction, resulting in melting Arctic ice and swelling sea levels, are tangible and significant.
NEWS
By James Gerstenzang and James Gerstenzang,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 8, 2007
HEILIGENDAMM, Germany -- Leaders of the world's richest industrialized nations agreed here yesterday to a compromise on efforts to combat global warming that had been sought by President Bush. Participants in the Group of Eight summit, led by German Chancellor Angela Merkel, yielded to Bush's insistence that while new talks were necessary to deal with climate change, the summit must not order specific steps and targets to reduce the greenhouse gases widely blamed for rising temperatures.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,Sun reporter | February 25, 2007
For those who want to see the planet but fret about the harmful environmental effects of driving and flying, a growing list of companies are offering a chance to "offset" the journey. They're called carbon offset programs, and they aim to reduce the threat of global warming that scientists say are caused by greenhouse gases emitted when burning fossil fuels. Using the offset programs, most available online, travelers can calculate how much carbon dioxide their trip produces and pay to generate an equal share of renewable energy such as wind or solar power.
NEWS
September 30, 2013
Looking through my calendar of national observances, it appears that October is turning into "food month," beginning with World Vegetarian Day and World Day for Farm Animals Oct. 1-2, continuing with National School Lunch Week, Oct. 14-18 and World Food Day on Oct. 16, and culminating with Food Day, Oct. 24. World Day for Farm Animals Day (www.WFAD.org), on Oct. 2, is perhaps the most dramatic of these. It celebrates the lives, exposes the abuses, and memorializes the slaughter of billions of sentient animals raised for food.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2013
The O'Malley administration's aggressive new plan to fight climate change calls for Maryland residents to further cut their energy use or face higher monthly utility bills. The plan, to be released Thursday by Gov. Martin O'Malley, also requires that more of the state's electricity come from renewable sources by 2020. Maryland's goals for reducing greenhouse gases are among the most ambitious in the nation. The plan requires stricter measures than previously proposed to meet the requirement set by the General Assembly in 2009 to cut carbon emissions that scientists say drive climate change.
NEWS
By Donald F. Boesch | July 23, 2013
Climate change is real. The stakes are high and the time is short. In Maryland, we just have to think about last week's sweltering weather to get a look into our future. In 50 years, it could be a rare summer day when temperatures in Maryland do not reach well into the 90s, with high humidity and warm nights. Most days would have code orange air quality or worse as the heat raises ozone levels, even as we are reducing air pollution. While we typically experience only two or three days when temperatures exceed 100 degrees, this would likely grow to 30 or more days, with life-threatening heat waves punctuated by intense downpours and flash flooding.
FEATURES
Laurel Peltier and Guest blogger | May 17, 2013
(An earlier version of this post included incorrect information about Maryland Gas & Electric, its pricing and whether it offers a "green" gas plan involving carbon offsets. The Sun regrets the errors.) ---------------- (Another in an occasional series of guest posts by GreenLaurel.com blogger Laurel Peltier) Marylanders have a choice in purchasing electricity for their homes to buy "green" power generated by wind turbines. They don't have as many options when it comes to natural gas for heating and cooking, but there is one company offering consumers a convenient if slightly pricier way to reduce the climate impact of their fuel choice -- through carbon offsets.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | January 15, 2013
Formstone may be out, but what about putting more wood into 21st century versions of Baltimore's classic urban dwelling, the row home? Hoping to encourage more use of climate-friendly wood in housing, the U.S. Forest Service is teaming up with City Hall to offer $10,000 in prizes to local architects and builders who come up with the most innovative row home designs that incorporate recycled and sustainably harvested wood and wood fiber. The "Carbon Challenge," as the design contest is called, is to be announced Tuesday morning at a press conference in the city's Oliver neighborhood.
NEWS
December 29, 2012
There was a rather perplexing statement in your article about using waste wood to heat homes and businesses ("Oldest fuel getting a new look," Dec. 25). The article suggested that since burning anything puts carbon into the atmosphere, some environmentalists doubted that burning wood for heat would combat climate change. Have these environmentalists heard of the carbon cycle? If you grow a tree, the tree absorbs carbon dioxide from the air and combines it with water to make wood.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 19, 1997
NAHUEL HUAPI NATIONAL PARK, Argentina -- Framed by the Patagonian wilderness, President Carlos Saul Menem of Argentina appeared with President Clinton yesterday to endorse Clinton's call for developing nations to join the effort to restrict gases that contribute to global warming.Clinton is seeking to negotiate limits on emissions for all countries, including developing ones. Many of those countries say that industrialized countries that have benefited most from polluting should bear the costs of addressing it.Menem said, "We agree with the United States when you say that a global problem such as climate change requires a global answer, coming from all countries."
NEWS
December 10, 2012
One can just imagine the future "Jeopardy" TV quiz show answer: The name of the international conference that took place in early December of 2012 that critics universally panned for accomplishing little despite overwhelming evidence of a global ecological catastrophe on the horizon. "Alex, what is the Doha Climate Change Conference?" would be the winning question and surely worth a lot to the right contestant. After all, the planet is already in "double jeopardy" - not only from climate change but from the continuing failure of the wealthiest nations to do much about it. As President Barack Obama is looking to come up with $60-to-$80 billion to offset the worst effects of Hurricane Sandy, a storm that practically shut down New York City, the world's media center, one would think the call to avoid more such costly catastrophes in the future would be deafening.
NEWS
November 5, 2012
Hurricane Sandy is one more dramatic demonstration that climate change and its extreme weather patterns are now part of our future. Although we're unlikely to reverse climate change, we can still mitigate its effects by reducing our driving, our energy use and our meat consumption. Yes, meat consumption. A 2006 United Nations report estimated that meat consumption accounts for 18 percent of man-made greenhouse gases. A 2009 article in the respected World Watch magazine suggested the real figure may be closer to 50 percent.
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