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By Janet Wilson and Janet Wilson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 9, 2007
Led by California and New England, 31 states representing more than 70 percent of the U.S. population announced yesterday that they will jointly track and measure greenhouse gas emissions by major industries. The newly formed Climate Registry is the latest example of states going further than the federal government in taking steps to combat global warming. State officials and some affected industries and environmentalists say the registry is a crucial precursor to both mandatory and market-based regulation of industrial gases that contribute to warming.
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NEWS
By Donald Boesch and Edward Maibach | September 25, 2014
George Mason University research, released jointly with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, shows that roughly three quarters of Marylanders understand that climate change is a threat to our health, homes, businesses and natural resources, and more than half of them support state initiatives to address the problem. Now, with elections less than two months away, it's time to ensure we continue to move forward. Maryland is highly vulnerable, with more than 3,000 miles of coastline.
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NEWS
By Hector Tobar and Hector Tobar,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 12, 2004
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina - The United States is the big odd man out as diplomats, scientists and environmentalists from more than 190 countries gather at the 10th meeting of the United Nations' Convention on Climate Change. The convention's Kyoto Protocol, with its mandatory reduction of "greenhouse gases" that cause global warming, goes into force next year. Discussions of new limits are expected to begin here when official delegations arrive Wednesday, near the end of the 12-day conference.
NEWS
August 4, 2014
How would you like to receive a quarterly check from the federal government? Most taxpayers would surely be happy with such an arrangement. But here's the really good part: What if by accepting that check you were also helping your country reduce a form of air pollution that is a threat to human health and responsible for climate change while simultaneously developing a rational, sustainable energy policy? That sounds too good to be true, but remarkably, it may not be. Under The Healthy Climate and Family Security Act introduced last week by Maryland Rep. Chris Van Hollen, companies that drill for oil and gas or mine for coal would have to purchase through auction a permit to do so. Not a dime of the resulting revenue would be kept by the government but would simply be forwarded as checks to every man, woman and child.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun reporter | August 16, 2007
About 60 global warming protesters raised an oversized hourglass outside the State House in Annapolis yesterday, telling Gov. Martin O'Malley that "the time to commit is now" to sweeping cuts in carbon dioxide pollution. "Doing nothing is no longer an option," state Del. Kumar P. Barve, the House Democratic leader, told the sign-waving group in the sweltering heat. "Every major reform that has ever happened in American history has happened first at the state level and then percolated up to the federal level."
NEWS
June 11, 2013
The latest word on climate change is not good — world emissions of carbon dioxide from energy use rose 1.4 percent last year to set a new record, according to the International Energy Agency. At this pace, the agency reports, global temperatures could rise a startling 9 degrees Fahrenheit by 2100, which would be disastrous for all nations. And yet this latest report has received minimal attention in the United States, at least outside the climate science community and its usual advocates.
NEWS
February 25, 2014
It came as no surprise to hear that certain U.S. Supreme Court justices hold misgivings about the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulating greenhouse gas emissions from power plants - and potentially other stationary sources. In arguments before the court Monday, it was apparent that even some of the liberal justices have doubts about how far the EPA's statutory authority can be pushed in this regard. But one thing was also clear, at least if one can draw conclusions based on the questions presented to the lawyers arguing Utility Air Regulatory Group v. EPA: A majority of the court appears content to let stand its 2007 ruling in Massachusetts v. EPA that held that the agency can consider carbon dioxide a pollutant despite its ubiquity.
NEWS
April 18, 2008
President Bush offered conclusive evidence this week that on the challenge of global warming, he just doesn't get it. Mr. Bush wants to begin reducing America's greenhouse gas emissions in 2025 - a date when most of the civilized world hopes to have achieved significant reductions. Mr. Bush's distant goal was greeted with derision by environmentalists, scientists, lawmakers and climate experts. But there is a serious, sensible proposal out there: a Senate bill that aims to reduce American greenhouse emissions by nearly a third by 2025.
NEWS
December 18, 2009
The article "How cap-and-trade pays" (Dec. 16) should have been titled "How cap-and-trade plays." The idea behind cap-and-trade is that one party agrees to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in exchange for money that allows another party to increase greenhouse emissions. This makes it more expensive to generate greenhouse gases and more economical to reduce greenhouse gases. The Mid-Atlantic states' scheme described in this article does not do this. It takes money from power plant operators and uses 73 percent of that money to subsidize energy consumers through rate relief and low-income energy assistance.
NEWS
January 28, 2009
Greenhouse gas bill can be a critical step It was good to read in Saturday's Baltimore Sun about the legislation that could help get Maryland moving to do its part in reducing greenhouse gases ("Md. climate bill seen likely to pass," Jan. 24). The 25 percent emissions reduction goal the bill would set is healthy, achievable and confidence-building. In the not-so-long run, the cluster of programs that will flow from this legislation will generate growth and curtail the damage we are causing our environment and would clearly emerge as the right course of action.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2014
A proposed natural gas export facility in Southern Maryland cleared another hurdle Thursday, when a federal review found the controversial project poses no significant risks to nearby residents' safety and no major environmental impacts. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission staff concluded that "with appropriate mitigating measures" the $3.8 billion project could go forward to build a gas liquefaction plant, a gas-fired power plant and to convert an existing import terminal at Cove Point, on the Chesapeake Bay in Calvert County.
NEWS
April 1, 2014
Rising sea levels and more severe weather may be the two effects of climate change that have gotten the most press, but as the latest report from the U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change makes clear, the impact will be far more widespread and disastrous, and the world remains ill-prepared to deal with that new reality. That's not to downplay what impact coastal flooding and more powerful storms or worsened droughts will have on the world; they are potentially disastrous.
NEWS
February 25, 2014
It came as no surprise to hear that certain U.S. Supreme Court justices hold misgivings about the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulating greenhouse gas emissions from power plants - and potentially other stationary sources. In arguments before the court Monday, it was apparent that even some of the liberal justices have doubts about how far the EPA's statutory authority can be pushed in this regard. But one thing was also clear, at least if one can draw conclusions based on the questions presented to the lawyers arguing Utility Air Regulatory Group v. EPA: A majority of the court appears content to let stand its 2007 ruling in Massachusetts v. EPA that held that the agency can consider carbon dioxide a pollutant despite its ubiquity.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2014
Chestertown officials have been interested in energy conservation for a long time - they started tracking usage levels during the 1970s energy crisis. Even so, when the Eastern Shore town launched a project to cut back on electricity costs seven years ago, the municipality cut usage by 11 percent and sliced more than $130,000 in annual expenses. Now local leaders are hoping to expand on that success. They've launched the ShorePower Project with four other communities - Cambridge, Easton, Salisbury and Snow Hill - to help leaders in those places find ways to use energy more efficiently and with less impact on the environment.
NEWS
By Mark Hofberg | December 10, 2013
What can I do to help the environment? As a master's student in conservation biology and environmental policy, I get this question often from my (mostly) left-leaning, but financially focused, friends. They generally understand that the environment is important, but with long work hours and an overflow "green" products and tips in the media, there is confusion about what is effective or even useful. There is a simple way to help; one that does not require wearing hemp or even scrapping your car (although that would be nice)
NEWS
November 21, 2013
In a recent opinion piece, Chesapeake Climate Action Network's James McGarry grossly mischaracterized recent studies on liquefied natural gas exports ( "Exporting natural gas is a bad deal for Maryland," Nov. 12). In reality, countless studies support LNG exports. In particular, a U.S. Department of Energy study, compiled by NERA Consulting, found that LNG exports will result in "net benefits to the U.S. economy" and that "consumers, in aggregate, are better off as a result of LNG exports.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | December 20, 2008
Maryland raised $18 million this week in an auction of rights for power plants to release climate-changing pollution, officials said yesterday. The bulk of the proceeds from Wednesday's auction in New York will finance energy-saving projects and help low-income residents pay their power bills. The auction of allowances for power plants in the Northeast and mid-Atlantic to emit carbon dioxide yielded a total of $106.5 million for the 10 states participating in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative.
NEWS
By Peter Morici | June 4, 2008
Congress is finally getting serious about global warming. But ironically, the approach it is considering would hasten, rather than slow, environmental calamity. The Senate opened debate this week on legislation known as the Warner-Lieberman bill. It would limit U.S. greenhouse gas emissions in 2012 to 2005 levels, and reduce those by 70 percent in 2050. Unfortunately, by encouraging energy-intensive American industries to flee to developing countries, this bill would penalize U.S. businesses that could contribute to reducing greenhouse gas emissions and thus accelerate global warming.
NEWS
September 23, 2013
The regulations released last week by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to limit carbon emissions from new power plants are so clearly necessary - and have been in the works for years - that it's difficult to even think of them as somehow controversial. That is, unless, one continues to deny the existence of man-made climate change. If you are a denier, well, there's not much to be said on the subject. It requires only that you ignore that global warming is happening at an unprecedented rate, that the heat-trapping effects of carbon dioxide have been documented since the mid-19 t h century, and that oceans are warming, sea levels are rising and glaciers have been retreating to a record extent.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | September 17, 2013
A broad coalition of environmental and other groups urged Gov. Martin O'Malley Tuesday to oppose development of a natural gas export terminal on the Chesapeake Bay, calling it an unacceptable environmental and safety threat. Members of the coalition, which includes more than 120 local, statewide and national groups, gathered outside the Maryland Public Service Commission offices just before noon to outline their concerns over the proposed liquefied natural gas (LNG) export facility at Cove Point in Calvert County.
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