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Greenhouse Effect

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By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | April 26, 1991
A Virginia scientist has challenged an apocalyptic notion of global warming popular among environmentalists.The so-called greenhouse effect, caused by the release of pollutants like carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, is real, the scientist told a group of Annapolis and South County activists Monday night.But environmental groups, the media and some politicians have oversimplified the problem to gain attention and shape national policy, said Patrick J. Michaels, an associate professor of environmental science at the University of Virginia.
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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | September 29, 2009
This lush marsh south of Annapolis seems like an alien landscape - clear plastic bubbles dot the watery plain, with curved white pipes poking, periscope-like, out of the tall, green grass. The odd-looking structures spread across Kirkpatrick Marsh are providing researchers with a peek into Earth's future, helping them understand how climate change could alter the world we live in. For the past 23 years, Bert Drake and other scientists at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in Shady Side have been monitoring the growth of marsh grasses and plants encased in the clear plastic bubbles on the fringe of the Rhode River.
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NEWS
By Phillip Davis and Phillip Davis,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 23, 1990
SHADY SIDE -- In a brackish marsh hard by the Chesapeake Bay, scientists are beginning to suspect that the "greenhouse effect" may not be the environmental disaster it was once thought it might be.Many plants, it seems, love increased amounts of carbon dioxide -- the gas that cars, power plants and factories spew into the air by the billions of tons.Researchers at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center here have spent $1.2 million and five years discovering something greenhouse farmers have known for decades: More carbon dioxide means faster plant growth and reproduction.
NEWS
By Christi Parsons and Jim Tankersley and Christi Parsons and Jim Tankersley,Tribune Newspapers | July 9, 2009
The failure to agree on swift, concrete steps to reduce greenhouse gas emissions at the summit meeting of the world's most advanced economies points to a continuing logjam and hard bargaining ahead on global warming - especially on the politically sensitive issue of who goes first. President Barack Obama and his counterparts in the Group of Eight, who are holding two days of meetings in the central Italian mountain town L'Aquila, announced broad agreements to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and combat rising global temperatures over the next four decades.
NEWS
May 5, 1991
The threat of global warming may not be as dire as some experts say,but Americans should be making changes in the way they consume energy, a Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. official said.Ted G. Ringger, supervisor of air and water quality for BG & E, spoke on "The Greenhouse Effect Theory" at the monthly Agribusiness breakfast Thursday at Baugher's Country Restaurant.He offered a simple explanation of the greenhouse effect: The atmosphere allows the sun to strike the Earth, but gases in the atmosphere trap and retain some of the heat, keeping the planet warm.
NEWS
By JIA-RUI CHONG and JIA-RUI CHONG,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 14, 2006
The European Space Agency's Venus Express spacecraft returned the first images of the planet's south pole yesterday, revealing a tempestuous sky of sulfuric acid clouds whipped by winds moving faster than 200 mph. Scientists have been hampered from peering into Venus' atmosphere because of a thick haze enshrouding the planet. But the spacecraft's infrared and visible cameras were able to capture two slices of the atmosphere at 34 miles and 40 miles above the surface. "We have been able to see the top 1 percent of the atmosphere," said Kevin Baines, a planetary scientist based at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 10, 1995
In an important shift of scientific judgment, experts advising the world's governments on climate change say for the first time that human activity is a likely cause of the warming of the global atmosphere.While many climatologists have thought this to be the case, all but a few have held until now that the climate is naturally so variable that they could not be sure they were seeing a clear signal of the feared "greenhouse effect" -- the heating of the atmosphere because of the carbon dioxide released by burning coal, oil and wood.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 24, 1992
Life on Earth may be doomed, but not for at least a billio years, two scientists suggest.This new estimate gives Earth's creatures a tenfold increase in life expectancy over a span proposed earlier. The latest estimate, by Dr. Ken Caldeira, a geochemist, and Dr. James F. Kasting, an atmospheric scientist, both of Pennsylvania State University, is based on a complex mathematical representation of interactions in the environment.For many reasons, scientists believe that life on Earth cannot survive indefinitely.
NEWS
April 8, 1991
Avoiding a last-minute procedural maneuver like the one that killed last year's bill, the legislature this year took a big step toward putting Maryland on the side of a better environment. By overwhelming votes -- 42-5 in the Senate, 121-14 in the House -- it approved what some supporters are calling the most far-reaching tree-protection bill in the country.Actually, the bill doesn't protect trees in the sense that it guards them against wanton destruction by developers and state agencies on a building frenzy: It is estimated that Maryland lost 71,000 acres of tree cover in just the past five years.
NEWS
By Leslie H. Gelb | February 13, 1991
THE ANSWER: John Sununu, White House chief of staff.vTC The question: Why are administration officials like Secretary of State Baker and William Reilly, head of the Environmental Protection Agency, afraid to speak their minds about the greenhouse effect -- those gases widely believed by scientists to be trapping heat and dangerously raising global temperatures?And why are they all so quiet when 130 nations are meeting near Washington on how to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases, principally carbon dioxide?
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | June 5, 2007
Scientists and engineers who launched NASA's Messenger spacecraft in 2004 to study the planet Mercury are hoping to learn more about another planet - Venus - when their spacecraft soars by that cloud-shrouded world tonight. Among other things, they would like to know more about global warming on Venus and why the "greenhouse" effect has made that planet's atmosphere hot enough to melt lead, while Earth's climate has so far remained habitable. The $426 million, Maryland-built Messenger spacecraft will fly within about 210 miles of Venus' surface just after 7 p.m. It will use Venus' gravity to bend its course toward a first encounter with Mercury in January, according to mission managers at the Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory near Laurel.
NEWS
By JIA-RUI CHONG and JIA-RUI CHONG,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 14, 2006
The European Space Agency's Venus Express spacecraft returned the first images of the planet's south pole yesterday, revealing a tempestuous sky of sulfuric acid clouds whipped by winds moving faster than 200 mph. Scientists have been hampered from peering into Venus' atmosphere because of a thick haze enshrouding the planet. But the spacecraft's infrared and visible cameras were able to capture two slices of the atmosphere at 34 miles and 40 miles above the surface. "We have been able to see the top 1 percent of the atmosphere," said Kevin Baines, a planetary scientist based at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif.
NEWS
By Denise Drake and By Denise Drake,Knight Ridder / Tribune | September 8, 2002
Walking through the orchid wing at the U.S. Botanic Garden, Gaylene and Jim Barstow were overwhelmed by the mass of rare tropicals. Blooming from the sides of rocks, hanging baskets and mossy corners were more than 200 varieties of orchids. "This place is really incredible," said Gaylene Barstow, 51, of Lincoln, Neb. "I've never seen so many orchids at one time." One of the oldest botanic gardens in America, the Botanic Garden prides itself on its collection of rare and endangered species.
NEWS
By Molly Ivins | September 2, 2002
AUSTIN -- A new wrinkle in the annals of corporate scandal: Salomon Smith Barney, the stock brokerage/investment banking firm, allocated almost a million shares of hot IPO (initial public offerings) shares in 21 different companies to Bernard Ebbers, CEO of WorldCom, and that is just the tip of the Everest, according to reports in The Wall Street Journal and elsewhere. Salomon also gave IPO shares to about two dozen other top telecom executives. According to The Journal, "The linking of investment banking business to IPO allocations has been a controversial, yet pervasive, practice on Wall Street."
NEWS
By K. C. Cole and K. C. Cole,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 30, 1996
As climatologists peer into the future to see whether global warming will turn the Earth into a hothouse, as some predict, they have a problem.Certainly, they know that people's addiction to gas-powered vehicles and the clearing of forests is pumping unprecedented amounts of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. Certainly, they agree that CO2 is a potent "greenhouse gas" -- so named because it traps heat like the glass of a greenhouse. And certainly, a warmer atmosphere will hold more water, and water vapor makes a more potent heat trap than even CO2.But when it comes to predicting whether the twin influences of CO2 and water would actually culminate in a global climate catastrophe, the climatologists are less sure.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 10, 1995
In an important shift of scientific judgment, experts advising the world's governments on climate change say for the first time that human activity is a likely cause of the warming of the global atmosphere.While many climatologists have thought this to be the case, all but a few have held until now that the climate is naturally so variable that they could not be sure they were seeing a clear signal of the feared "greenhouse effect" -- the heating of the atmosphere because of the carbon dioxide released by burning coal, oil and wood.
NEWS
By ERNEST B. FURGURSON and ERNEST B. FURGURSON,Ernest B. Furgurson is associate editor of The Sun | November 17, 1991
Washington. -- On Halloween, my grandson James, age four years and four weeks, went trick-or-treating dressed as a tyrannosaurus rex. He made this decision after considering whether he would look better as a brontosaurus, or perhaps a triceratops or diplodocus.Last Christmas, his favorite gift was an inflatable stegosaurus, bigger than me, with which he wrestled through the winter. Before he was three, he could identify more species of dinosaur than I could of birds at his age.We are living in the second dinosaur era. This one is driven by an irresistible force known as American merchandising, which creates fads and abandons them overnight, and sells us many ideas bad for our health.
NEWS
By Molly Ivins | September 2, 2002
AUSTIN -- A new wrinkle in the annals of corporate scandal: Salomon Smith Barney, the stock brokerage/investment banking firm, allocated almost a million shares of hot IPO (initial public offerings) shares in 21 different companies to Bernard Ebbers, CEO of WorldCom, and that is just the tip of the Everest, according to reports in The Wall Street Journal and elsewhere. Salomon also gave IPO shares to about two dozen other top telecom executives. According to The Journal, "The linking of investment banking business to IPO allocations has been a controversial, yet pervasive, practice on Wall Street."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 24, 1992
Life on Earth may be doomed, but not for at least a billio years, two scientists suggest.This new estimate gives Earth's creatures a tenfold increase in life expectancy over a span proposed earlier. The latest estimate, by Dr. Ken Caldeira, a geochemist, and Dr. James F. Kasting, an atmospheric scientist, both of Pennsylvania State University, is based on a complex mathematical representation of interactions in the environment.For many reasons, scientists believe that life on Earth cannot survive indefinitely.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | November 18, 1991
Cities of the world are telegraphing a strong message to organizers of ''Earth Summit,'' the United Nations' big Conference on the Environment and Development to be held next June in Rio de Janeiro.Cities want the 166 national delegations to Rio, many led by presidents and prime ministers, to recognize that without healthy cities, the entire globe may get very sick. They want cities high on the conference agenda, up there with global warming, deforestation, desertification, the loss of animal and plant species.
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