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NEWS
November 15, 1991
Harry J. Greenebaum, 89, retired owner of a chain of men's clothing stores, died Wednesday at Sinai Hospital after a heart attack.Services were being held today at the Levinson funeral establishment, 6010 Reisterstown Road.L Mr. Greenebaum, who lived in the Eleven Slade Apartments, retired in 1984 and sold the chain of nine Young's Men's Stores, which grew from a store he and a partner started in 1946. Before starting his own business, he had been a buyer of men's clothing for the Hub, a Charles Street department store.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2010
Dr. Merrill Jon Egorin, an internationally known cancer researcher, a founder of the University of Maryland's Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, and a co-director of the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute's Molecular Therapeutics and Drug Discovery Program, died Aug. 7 of multiple myeloma at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Shadyside Hospital. The former Reisterstown resident was 62. "He was a brilliant, insightful and funny man who always made me laugh.
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NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 31, 1996
Pearl Greenebaum, who spent her life helping others, died Tuesday at Keswick Home. She was 90.She comforted shell-shocked veterans at Perry Point Veterans Hospital for 40 years, helped refugees who fled Europe during the Nazi era and read to the blind.Mrs. Geenebaum was a volunteer at the Jewish Armed Services Committee of Baltimore and Children's Hospital, and took Goucher College students into her home."My mother's life was one of example and not words," said her son, Howard M. Greenebaum, of Kure Beach, N.C."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2010
Stanley I. Greenebaum, a retired wholesale appliance executive and World War II combat veteran, died of a stroke July 8 at Sinai Hospital. The Pikesville resident was 85. Born in Baltimore, he grew up on Menlo Drive and graduated from Forest Park High School in 1942. He entered the Army a few months later and was moved from post to post, including Maryland, Washington, Kentucky and Texas. While in the artillery school at Fort Sill in Oklahoma he received orders to report to Officer Candidate School.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | March 3, 1996
Stewart J. Greenebaum and Sam Rose are to real estate development what Tony Randall and Jack Klugman were to television.Mr. Greenebaum, always nattily dressed in a crisp suit and tie, plays golf, attends the theater, chairs the University of Maryland Medical System and devotes considerable time to charity. Mr. Rose hunts, fishes, collects art and raises bees, and boasts that he hasn't worn neckwear in more than 20 years.Mr. Rose's expertise lies in building lucrative office towers in Washington, D.C., while Mr. Greenebaum develops land for communities such as Shipley's Choice in Anne Arundel County.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | September 9, 1999
The developer who wants to build a Columbia-style village in southeastern Howard County said last night that he could bring a Fortune 500 company to the area if the Zoning Board approves his plan.Stewart J. Greenebaum hailed his proposal as a "watershed development" for the county, but he told the board that the county would not be able to reap any rewards until he was permitted to build his mixed-use project on the Iager farm in Fulton."This is not a pipe dream. We can bring them here," said Greenebaum of attracting a high-tech company to a corporate headquarters-style structure.
NEWS
By Jamal E. Watson and Jamal E. Watson,SUN STAFF | November 23, 1999
After weeks of listening to a developer make his case for a large-scale project in Fulton, residents opposed to it are going on the attack in the latest phase of public hearings.Tonight's hearing before the Howard County Zoning Board marks the opponents' first full-fledged assault on Stewart J. Greenebaum's proposal to build 1,168 residential units, 150,000 square feet of retail space and more than 1 million square feet of office space on a 507-acre turkey farm."We plan on bringing in our own expert witnesses to testify on the impact of this mixed-used project," said Peter G. Oswald, vice president of the Greater Beaufort Park Citizens Association.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | September 4, 2008
The federal government has named the University of Maryland's Greenebaum Cancer Center a national cancer center - a distinction that comes with $3 million in research money over the next three years and that will open the door to additional grants, studies and cutting-edge cancer drugs. The Greenebaum center's recognition by the National Cancer Institute was announced yesterday at a news conference at the university medical complex in Baltimore. "The NCI designation means that the cancer center possesses a unique combination of excellence in care and clinical research," said E. Albert Reece, dean of the University of Maryland School of Medicine.
NEWS
By Jamal E. Watson and Jamal E. Watson,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1999
Howard County Zoning Board hearings on Stewart J. Greenebaum's controversial plan to convert a turkey farm in Fulton into a community of homes and office buildings likely will continue well into the early part of next year.Last night marked the 10th hearing before the Zoning Board since it took up the case last month. Three of the developer's witnesses have testified, with others expected to be called to testify in support of the plan in the next few months.Greenebaum blames area residents -- many of whom remain opposed to his plans to develop the 507-acre farm -- for dragging out the hearings with extensive questioning of his expert witnesses.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2000
Greenebaum & Rose Associates Inc., a real estate development firm with operations in Baltimore and Washington, said yesterday that it has been selected to develop an 11-story office building for the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Student Financial Assistance Programs in Washington. The 220,000-square-foot, $28 million project -- which is expected to be completed in July 2001 -- will be the centerpiece of Greenebaum & Rose's Union Center Plaza, a tract of land the firm owns near Union Station in Northeast Washington, said Sam Rose, a partner in the real estate firm.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | March 9, 2009
Michael Greenebaum and Jon Sevel had been running buddies for years, covering some 1,200 miles and three Marine Corps Marathons, when they decided to establish a race on their home turf in Baltimore County. There was never any doubt about which race: a half-marathon. Despite an odd length at 13.1 miles and a lack of elitist appeal, the half has become a full-blown craze among runners, experienced and new. The number of those running in general has been booming for the past 15 years. But half-marathons have been the fastest-growing road race in recent years, according to Running USA Inc., a Ventura, Calif.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | September 4, 2008
The federal government has named the University of Maryland's Greenebaum Cancer Center a national cancer center - a distinction that comes with $3 million in research money over the next three years and that will open the door to additional grants, studies and cutting-edge cancer drugs. The Greenebaum center's recognition by the National Cancer Institute was announced yesterday at a news conference at the university medical complex in Baltimore. "The NCI designation means that the cancer center possesses a unique combination of excellence in care and clinical research," said E. Albert Reece, dean of the University of Maryland School of Medicine.
NEWS
By JANENE HOLZBERG | July 18, 2008
It's almost as if Tim and Emily Higgins willed Maple Lawn into existence. A planned development of homes and businesses on 600 acres in southwestern Howard County, the neighborhood had yet to be advertised when the couple went in search of it more than four years ago. At the time, they both worked in Gaithersburg near a similar mixed-use project called Kentlands. They admired its emphasis on neighborliness, with tightly packed houses built within easy walking distance of recreation, restaurants, shops and offices.
NEWS
BY A SUN REPORTER | January 20, 2006
It took a decade, but the adversaries in the dispute over the luxury planned community of Maple Lawn, Maryland, finally reached an agreement on the short-term future of the multimillion-dollar project. There were broad smiles and kind words from both sides after the accord was reached and ratified by the Zoning Board. Richard B. Talkin, an attorney representing the developer, noted: "Resolve and Maple Lawn - it's hard to imagine" that those words would ever be coupled. The agreement, though, is less a permanent armistice than a temporary truce.
NEWS
By Gerald P. Merrell and Gerald P. Merrell,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2005
Rows of steel pillars jut like Virginia pines, and blacktop is laid and packed tightly to the south. At the opposite end, a power saw roars as another precision cut is made that within minutes will be transformed into the skin for a family room wall. Slowly, but unimpeded, Maple Lawn, Maryland will soon convert farm pasture into an expansive luxury residential, commercial and entertainment complex in the image of old-town America. The development, which when completed will encompass more than 600 acres in Fulton in southeastern Howard County, is expected to welcome its first homeowners in the spring and its first restaurant - Bluestone - and office tenant in the summer.
NEWS
By Gerald P. Merrell and Gerald P. Merrell,SUN STAFF | December 20, 2004
Rows of steel pillars jut like Virginia pines, and blacktop is laid and packed tightly to the south. At the opposite end, a power saw roars as another precision cut is made that within minutes will be transformed into the skin for a family room wall. Slowly, but unimpeded, Maple Lawn, Maryland will soon convert farm pasture into an expansive luxury residential, commercial and entertainment complex in the image of old-town America. The development, which when completed will encompass more than 600 acres in Fulton in southeastern Howard County, is expected to welcome its first homeowners in the spring and its first restaurant -- Bluestone -- and office tenant in the summer.
NEWS
By Jamal E. Watson and Jamal E. Watson,SUN STAFF | June 16, 1999
Plans to develop one of the largest mixed-used communities in Howard County since the founding of Columbia will move forward, despite a breakdown last week in negotiations between the developer and the community.Stewart G. Greenebaum said yesterday that he will make the case before the Howard County Zoning Board next week that the mixed-use development he proposes on the site of a 507-acre turkey farm in Fulton would have a positive impact on the county and the state."What we're planning on doing will be very significant for Howard County," Greene-baum said at a news conference at his Pikesville office.
FEATURES
By Maryalice Yakutchik and Maryalice Yakutchik,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 12, 1997
Marlene Greenebaum remembers a time when she actually referred to it euphemistically as the C-word. But that was a lifetime ago, before the bilateral mastectomy in the summer of 1990 and before the subsequent chemotherapy.Having faced cancer and won, her name now is very boldly and publicly linked with the very same word from which she once shied away in private conversation with friends.A glass and chrome elevator opens on the ninth floor of the Gudelsky Building at the University of Maryland Medical System to reveal gleaming brass letters that proclaim this space as the Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2004
The developer of Maple Lawn Farms, an already large housing and commercial project in southern Howard County that won approval four years ago after a long battle, is seeking to expand the project by about 50 percent. The density of homes at Maple Lawn - the last big development in Howard's fast-growth cycle, which will rise on a former turkey farm - was a highly contentious issue in 2000, when the Zoning Board approved the current plan after 32 long, often late-night hearings. The proposed changes, which include about 500 additional homes and 685,000 square feet of commercial development, could revive the philosophical dispute over land use that raged during the zoning hearings - whether a concentration of homes, stores and offices helps or hurts congestion in the Baltimore-Washington corridor.
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