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NEWS
November 1, 1995
THE CLOSING of the U.S. Navy Ship Research and Development Center on a 231-acre peninsula that juts into the Chesapeake Bay is a momentous decision for Annapolis.The U.S. Naval Academy is the new owner of this breathtakingly scenic piece of real estate that contains many of the remnants of Providence, the 1648 Puritan community built by Maryland's first European settlers.The site has been a radio facility going back to 1918. It currently contains 15 giant transmission towers on its antenna farm and provides very low frequency communications for submarines in the Atlantic Ocean.
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NEWS
November 9, 2008
Naval Academy school plans fundraiser run, walk The Naval Academy Primary School will hold a 5-kilometer and 10-kilometer run and 5-kilometer walk and kids fun run today at the school, 74 Greenbury Point Road, Annapolis. The race will take place along the scenic path at the Naval Station Annapolis Greenbury Point Natural Area overlooking the Severn River. The event is to raise money for the school that serves Naval Academy and military families. Check-in will begin at 7:30 a.m., and the runs and walks are to start at 9 a.m. Registration is $20 in advance and $25 the day of the race.
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FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 13, 1999
For more than 80 years, the huge three-legged red and white radio transmission towers at Greenbury Point, east of Annapolis, have been as much a part of the local scene as the State House with the golden acorn atop its dome.Once called the "world's biggest chatterbox" and described as a "steel toothpick," the Naval Radio Transmitting Facility, its formal name, was known around the world by its call letters, NSS.Visible some 35 miles down the Chesapeake Bay, and for a time the tallest structures in Maryland, the great aerial cobweb of steel cables and wires also served another purpose.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,chris.guy@baltsun.com | October 5, 2008
Nearly a decade after the Navy retired and dismantled 19 communications towers along the Severn River, a fledgling energy company is planning to build wind turbines that would turn the near-constant breeze there into electricity. David Murrin, a merchant mariner who has formed a partnership with his lifelong friend, developer and marina owner Marcellous Butler, wants to build up to 10 high-tech windmills near the Naval Academy at Greenbury Point - enough, he said to provide power for as many as 10,000 homes.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | November 15, 1995
The Naval Academy plans to keep Greenbury Point, the 231-acre peninsula that holds the Navy's landmark communications towers, as a wildlife refuge after the towers are demolished. But plans for removing the towers have provoked ecological and historical concerns.Each summer, 15 to 20 pairs of osprey -- federally protected migratory birds -- nest in the towers."When they take down the towers, the osprey lose their nesting platforms," Allan Haury, president of the Maryland Ornithological Society, said yesterday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey | August 19, 2004
10K challenge Early risers can test their brawn against members of the armed forces in the fourth annual Spectrum Challenge 10K Race on Saturday. The race -- sponsored in part by the Annapolis Naval Station -- is open to military and civilians. The course is mostly flat, but there is one hill around the three-mile mark. The race starts and ends at the Greenbury Point Nature Center, and runners will get views of the water and Bay Bridge. Several water stations will be along the route. Registration is 6:30 a.m.-7:40 a.m., and the starting gun goes off at 8 a.m. The cost is $12. Greenbury Point Nature Center is at the U.S. Naval Station in Annapolis.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,SUN STAFF | September 20, 1996
The Coast Guard and Maryland Natural Resources Police searched yesterday for a 37-year-old Grasonville woman who was presumed drowned after she fell from a powerboat into the Chesapeake Bay near Greenbury Point.The woman, whose name was not released, fell overboard Wednesday night as the boat cruised south from Whitehall Creek toward the South River, said Richard McIntire, a spokesman for the state Department of Natural Resources."Obviously, she is presumed drowned at this point," McIntire said late yesterday afternoon.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1999
The 20 or so osprey families have all migrated south, so they won't be around tomorrow to see their homes on the tall spindly structures destroyed. But Osprey Man will be there. He's still not sure yet how the detonation will affect his life -- or the birds he's come to love.John Schorpp -- aka Osprey Man -- manages and maintains the U.S. Navy's 16 steel radio towers on Greenbury Point, across the Severn River from downtown Annapolis.The Navy hasn't used the towers for years, leaving Schorpp behind as the lone employee of the Navy's obsolete radio transmission station.
NEWS
By PHIL GREENFIELD and PHIL GREENFIELD,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 6, 1995
The Other Little Theater, in its fifth year of residence at the Naval Station on Greenbury Point, has carved out a nice little niche for itself among our local dramatic troupes, and its current production of "The Shame of Tombstone," a hilarious melodrama, is a cute one that deserves an audience.As folks are reminded at the beginning of the show, melodrama is not a passive genre. Viewers must be prepared to ooh and aah for the heroine, and hiss and boo the villain within an inch of his life.
NEWS
September 6, 1998
Congress approves funds for two county projectsLegislation funding two Anne Arundel County projects has passed both houses of Congress and has been forwarded to the president for approval. They are a $4.3 million demolition of the 19 radio towers at the Naval Station on Greenbury Point in Annapolis and a $5.3 million construction of an emergency services center at Fort Meade to house its police station, fire station and ambulance service.The Navy has created a conservation area since closing the Greenbury Point station in 1995.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey | August 19, 2004
10K challenge Early risers can test their brawn against members of the armed forces in the fourth annual Spectrum Challenge 10K Race on Saturday. The race -- sponsored in part by the Annapolis Naval Station -- is open to military and civilians. The course is mostly flat, but there is one hill around the three-mile mark. The race starts and ends at the Greenbury Point Nature Center, and runners will get views of the water and Bay Bridge. Several water stations will be along the route. Registration is 6:30 a.m.-7:40 a.m., and the starting gun goes off at 8 a.m. The cost is $12. Greenbury Point Nature Center is at the U.S. Naval Station in Annapolis.
BUSINESS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 21, 1999
After moving 14 times in 33 years, retired Coast Guard Rear Adm. Gordon Piche and his wife, Jane, were determined to find the perfect house for their retirement. After all, this would be their first permanent "post" since they were married 35 years ago.For 10 months, the Piches searched for their elusive dream home, only to be disappointed. If the house was right, it seemed that the location was wrong."It became apparent that the location was more important than finding our `dream house,' " Mrs. Piche said.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 13, 1999
For more than 80 years, the huge three-legged red and white radio transmission towers at Greenbury Point, east of Annapolis, have been as much a part of the local scene as the State House with the golden acorn atop its dome.Once called the "world's biggest chatterbox" and described as a "steel toothpick," the Naval Radio Transmitting Facility, its formal name, was known around the world by its call letters, NSS.Visible some 35 miles down the Chesapeake Bay, and for a time the tallest structures in Maryland, the great aerial cobweb of steel cables and wires also served another purpose.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1999
The 20 or so osprey families have all migrated south, so they won't be around tomorrow to see their homes on the tall spindly structures destroyed. But Osprey Man will be there. He's still not sure yet how the detonation will affect his life -- or the birds he's come to love.John Schorpp -- aka Osprey Man -- manages and maintains the U.S. Navy's 16 steel radio towers on Greenbury Point, across the Severn River from downtown Annapolis.The Navy hasn't used the towers for years, leaving Schorpp behind as the lone employee of the Navy's obsolete radio transmission station.
NEWS
September 6, 1998
Congress approves funds for two county projectsLegislation funding two Anne Arundel County projects has passed both houses of Congress and has been forwarded to the president for approval. They are a $4.3 million demolition of the 19 radio towers at the Naval Station on Greenbury Point in Annapolis and a $5.3 million construction of an emergency services center at Fort Meade to house its police station, fire station and ambulance service.The Navy has created a conservation area since closing the Greenbury Point station in 1995.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,SUN STAFF | September 20, 1996
The Coast Guard and Maryland Natural Resources Police searched yesterday for a 37-year-old Grasonville woman who was presumed drowned after she fell from a powerboat into the Chesapeake Bay near Greenbury Point.The woman, whose name was not released, fell overboard Wednesday night as the boat cruised south from Whitehall Creek toward the South River, said Richard McIntire, a spokesman for the state Department of Natural Resources."Obviously, she is presumed drowned at this point," McIntire said late yesterday afternoon.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,chris.guy@baltsun.com | October 5, 2008
Nearly a decade after the Navy retired and dismantled 19 communications towers along the Severn River, a fledgling energy company is planning to build wind turbines that would turn the near-constant breeze there into electricity. David Murrin, a merchant mariner who has formed a partnership with his lifelong friend, developer and marina owner Marcellous Butler, wants to build up to 10 high-tech windmills near the Naval Academy at Greenbury Point - enough, he said to provide power for as many as 10,000 homes.
NEWS
August 26, 1994
A 39-year-old Annapolis handyman admitted in Anne Arundel Circuit Court yesterday that he robbed three elderly women in their homes earlier this year.Arnold Brown of the first block of Fleet Street pleaded guilty to two counts of robbery, one count of theft and one count of escape yesterday before Judge Raymond G. Thieme Jr.He could go to prison for up to 31 years when sentenced Oct. 6.Assistant State's Attorney William Mulford said that Brown, who had been previously convicted of breaking and entering, walked away from a county work-release program after he told a jail correctional officer last Feb. 18 he was going into the Maryland National Bank on Church Circle to get some money.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | November 15, 1995
The Naval Academy plans to keep Greenbury Point, the 231-acre peninsula that holds the Navy's landmark communications towers, as a wildlife refuge after the towers are demolished. But plans for removing the towers have provoked ecological and historical concerns.Each summer, 15 to 20 pairs of osprey -- federally protected migratory birds -- nest in the towers."When they take down the towers, the osprey lose their nesting platforms," Allan Haury, president of the Maryland Ornithological Society, said yesterday.
NEWS
November 1, 1995
THE CLOSING of the U.S. Navy Ship Research and Development Center on a 231-acre peninsula that juts into the Chesapeake Bay is a momentous decision for Annapolis.The U.S. Naval Academy is the new owner of this breathtakingly scenic piece of real estate that contains many of the remnants of Providence, the 1648 Puritan community built by Maryland's first European settlers.The site has been a radio facility going back to 1918. It currently contains 15 giant transmission towers on its antenna farm and provides very low frequency communications for submarines in the Atlantic Ocean.
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