Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGreen Thumb
IN THE NEWS

Green Thumb

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Diane E. Otts and Diane E. Otts,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 19, 1997
Two years ago, at an age when many people are considering retirement, Richard Holmes needed to re-enter the job market.The 64-year-old had rich and varied work experience in acting, education and radio and television production. But Holmes knew some of his skills were outdated. The Elkridge resident was unsure how to put together a modern-looking resume.Green Thumb, a federally funded employment and training program for low-income seniors, came to his rescue.Holmes is one of about 40 Howard County seniors helped annually by Green Thumb, which is coordinated in Howard and all of the Western Maryland counties by Ellicott City resident Karen Curran Fields.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
The 2014-2015 season of Live Arts Maryland's Annapolis Chorale and Annapolis Chamber Orchestra promises to be a celebration of music director J. Ernest Green's 30 years with the organization. Green has enriched Anne Arundel County's cultural scene by delivering extraordinary music to Annapolis, and Live Arts has even more to celebrate this year with the opening of the renovated theater at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts. Green conducted the first performance at the unveiling celebration Sept.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Joan Jackson and Joan Jackson,Knight Ridder/Tribune | February 28, 1999
There is only one garden guru in America, and his name is Elvin McDonald. Oh, sure, he might not be as widely recognized as Martha Stewart, but McDonald has been a leading horticultural authority for nearly 50 years.So, who better to ask about the status of gardening in America?"It's great. Wonderful," says McDonald, while promoting his new book, "100 Orchids for the American Gardener" (Workman, $17.95)."One of the great blessings we have today is that the immense popularity of gardening has made competition greater: The plants and seeds are better; the magazines and books are better; some of the TV shows are better.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | April 18, 2012
Sometimes rain is perfect for a public event - when it involves growing things. The skies dripped helpfully today as MayorStephanie Rawlings-Blakeand a gaggle of dignitaries turned out to celebrate the launch of a new community garden in West Baltimore's Upton neighborhood. With the help of volunteers from nonprofits and financial support from the  Scott's Miracle-Gro Co.. 32 vacant lots in the 500 block of Laurens Street have been cleared and prepared for raising vegetables and fruit.  The "edible garden," as it's being called, is part of the mayor's " Power in Dirt " initiative seeking to convert vacant lots into productive, community-managed open spaces.
BUSINESS
May 1, 1998
A national nonprofit group that provides training for high-tech jobs announced yesterday that it will use a Microsoft Corp. donation of $350,000 to expand its pilot programs, including one in Baltimore.Green Thumb Inc. began programs in Sacramento, Calif., and Austin, Texas, last month with a $250,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Labor that currently provide technology training for seniors.The Microsoft grant will be used to extend the training to welfare recipients. Baltimore's program will be open to both groups and is scheduled to begin this month.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,SUN STAFF | March 22, 2001
Spring is here at last, and naturally thoughts turn to gardens and gardening. We don't all start out with a green thumb. Many of us need a little practice getting our knees muddied and palms dirtied. And then - just maybe - we'll find our knack for gardening. For beginners, there's an array of gardening workshops, talks, classes and demonstrations in the area. For those who just like to stroll through others' landscapes, there are numerous tours of private and public gardens. And for those who can't get enough of garden shows, exhibits and festivals, get ready to mark up your calendar.
NEWS
January 29, 2005
George "Doc" Abraham, 89, a wisecracking gardening guru who teamed up with his wife on one of the longest-running shows on American radio with the same hosts, died Thursday in Canandaigua, N.Y., of complications from congestive heart failure. The couple wrapped up the last edition of "The Green Thumb" on Dec. 14, 2002, with a trademark signoff they had used for a half-century. "Gotta grow now!" Mr. Abraham said. "And don't forget to be neighborly," his wife, Katy, piped in. The half-hour, call-in show first went on the air in 1952, offering practical advice on flowers, fruit bugs and lawn care mixed in with his down-home humor and her poetry recitations.
EXPLORE
By Jennifer K. Dansicker | February 27, 2012
Searching for some good old-fashioned family fun that doesn't involve a video game? If so, you should check out Churchville Golf Range. This family-run recreation center, on Churchville Road, has two miniature golf courses, a driving range, nine softball and baseball batting cages, a golf pro shop and an arcade for those who still want their video game fix. Joyce and Ken Rizer purchased, renovated and expanded this Churchville gem from Joyce's...
NEWS
By Patrick Ercolano | May 20, 1991
THOMAS JEFFERSON'S GARDEN BOOK. Edited by Edwin Morris Betts. The American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia. 621 pages. $25.WHAT WOULD Thomas Jefferson have thought of a president who hates broccoli?Jefferson apparently was a broccoli kind of guy. At least we can assume as much because he planted plenty of it at his Virginia home.Our third president's endeavors with broccoli and numerous other vegetables, fruits, flowers, shrubs and trees were recorded in a journal, or "garden book," that he kept from 1766 to 1824, two years before he died at the age of 83.Published in 1944 by the American Philosophical Society, which Jefferson served as president for 18 years, the book has become a perennial favorite among gardeners who savor a good read as much as they enjoy a juicy, home-grown tomato.
FEATURES
By Donna Erickson and Donna Erickson,King Features Syndicate | May 23, 1992
Cultivating green thumbs can be a growing experience for everyone in your family this summer. Young gardeners delight in observing the wonder of growing vegetables and flowers, not to mention the bugs and insects lurking between the radishes and peas. Whether you and your kids tend a mini-garden in a planter box on a patio or a large plot in a backyard, there are fun things to do to keep everyone's enthusiasm going.* Instead of planting the seeds in rows, which can be difficult for little hands, divide your child's plot into several 16-inch squares.
EXPLORE
By Jennifer K. Dansicker | February 27, 2012
Searching for some good old-fashioned family fun that doesn't involve a video game? If so, you should check out Churchville Golf Range. This family-run recreation center, on Churchville Road, has two miniature golf courses, a driving range, nine softball and baseball batting cages, a golf pro shop and an arcade for those who still want their video game fix. Joyce and Ken Rizer purchased, renovated and expanded this Churchville gem from Joyce's...
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach, Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2010
The 93rd Flowermart might have seniority, but it's far from the only place where you can buy flowers and other plants this weekend — and we're not talking about the neighborhood grocery, hardware or department store. We're talking about special events where horticulture and green-thumbery reign. Here are three possibilities: Historic Annapolis Maybe you've been to Annapolis' historic William Paca House, home to both a signer of the Declaration of Independence and one of the area's most fabulously ornate gardens?
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks and Dan Rodricks,daniel.rodricks@baltsun.com | August 2, 2009
Urban gardeners - green-thumbed Baltimoreans who grow their own fruits and vegetables on hundreds of 10-by-15-foot plots around the city - put down their hoes and gathered under a tent in War Memorial Plaza last evening to sample each other's bounty and toast a great growing season. The Annual City Farms and Community Gardens Supper, now in its 22d year, brought to an increasingly green plaza in front of City Hall dozens of men and women who've been toiling through spring and summer to produce tomatoes and peppers, kale and Swiss chard, cabbage and cucumbers in eight "farms" in city parks.
FEATURES
By Beth Botts and Beth Botts,Chicago Tribune | June 14, 2008
"You think I'd crumble? You think I'd lay down and die? Oh no, not I. I will survive!" So sang Gloria Gaynor in 1978. And sure enough, there are plants alive today that were thriving when disco was king. There are plants that are practically guaranteed to make it in your garden, even if they are the very first you've ever planted. Note that adverb: "practically." No plant can live without the basics: water, sunlight, good soil and, most important, the right site. So choose and prepare your site carefully, add water and fertilizer as needed - and chances are very, very good that these plants will survive, and even make you proud.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones Bon-brest and Nancy Jones Bon-brest,Special to the Sun | March 28, 2007
Andy Herman Regional manager TruGreen LandCare, Essex Salary --$65,000 Age --33 Years on the job --10 How he got started --After graduating from Pennsylvania State University with a degree in landscape contracting and horticulture, Herman was recruited by TruGreen to work in Delaware as an assistant supervisor in its commercial landscaping division. He is now a regional manager supervising more than $900,000 in contracts for lawn care, ground maintenance, landscaping and weed removal at businesses.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,SUN REPORTER | December 4, 2005
This time of year, there's not much left to do in the garden except rake up the last of the leaves. That makes it the perfect time to think about what you're going to do better next year. We asked gardening experts to give us their suggestions for New Year's resolutions. Here's what they think is important: Scott Meyer, editor, Organic Gardening magazine For the novice gardener: I will water and fertilize when necessary, no less and absolutely no more. I will leave one small corner of my yard uncultivated and unmowed, where wildlife can live in peace.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,Sun Staff Writer | July 14, 1995
Just a few years ago, trash blew and weeds flourished around the Flag House Court public housing project in Baltimore City. Front yards consisted of dirt and shards of broken glass.Then the kids started to do something about it.The Albemarle Street Summer Youth Project uses area teens ages 14 to 18 years old to landscape and to maintain a two-block area around the housing project. The program is part of the Baltimore City Life Museum's effort to revitalize and to maintain Jonestown, the neighborhood that surrounds the museum and Flag House Court.
NEWS
April 20, 1997
Pub Date: 4/20/97
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2005
Larry and Linda Webster have spent more than two decades transforming a dusty cornfield into 20 acres of lush gardens that they will show off tomorrow to about 700 guests on the annual Maryland House and Garden Pilgrimage. For the past few weeks, the Websters have been planting, pruning, and mulching to prepare their grounds to be one of 12 stops on the Carroll County segment of the tour. The pilgrimage, which includes more than 100 homes and gardens throughout the state, moves Saturday to horse country in Baltimore and Harford counties, the last stops on the 68th annual tour that began April 23 in Kent County, then moved to Calvert and continued through Howard County last week.
NEWS
January 29, 2005
George "Doc" Abraham, 89, a wisecracking gardening guru who teamed up with his wife on one of the longest-running shows on American radio with the same hosts, died Thursday in Canandaigua, N.Y., of complications from congestive heart failure. The couple wrapped up the last edition of "The Green Thumb" on Dec. 14, 2002, with a trademark signoff they had used for a half-century. "Gotta grow now!" Mr. Abraham said. "And don't forget to be neighborly," his wife, Katy, piped in. The half-hour, call-in show first went on the air in 1952, offering practical advice on flowers, fruit bugs and lawn care mixed in with his down-home humor and her poetry recitations.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.