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BUSINESS
By Carol Emert and Carol Emert,States News Service | May 19, 1993
WASHINGTON -- "Green technology" is the economic wave o the future, says Maryland Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, and it's a wave the United States can't afford to miss.A bill introduced yesterday by Ms. Mikulski, Sen. Max Baucus of Montana and Sen. Joseph I. Lieberman of Connecticut, all Democrats, would help transform the United States from a service-based economy to one centered on "environmental technologies," Ms. Mikulski said at a news conference.Environmental technology is broadly defined as any product that helps clean up pollution, or that is cleaner or more energy-efficient than a traditional product -- such as an electric car or an energy-saving light bulb.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2014
The Abell Foundation, best known for its charitable work battling poverty in Baltimore, went to court this week over a very different venture: designing hybrid engines for vehicles. Over the past 15 years, the foundation quietly became a player in the future of automobile development. It invested more than $25 million in Paice, a Baltimore firm that invented a way to improve the performance of combined gas/electric engines but in recent years has spent considerable time in court.
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BUSINESS
By Carol Emert and Carol Emert,States News Service | July 22, 1992
WASHINGTON -- A solar-powered icemaker made by Energy Concepts Co. of Annapolis is the only feasible way for many people in developing countries to have refrigeration, according to the company's founder, Donald Erickson. But developing and marketing the product has been stymied by the lumbering U.S. government bureaucracy, Mr. Erickson told a Senate committee yesterday.Arguing that the country was missing out on an enormous world market for emerging environmental technologies, Mr. Erickson was testifying on behalf of a bill introduced by Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, D-Md.
EXPLORE
August 13, 2012
The U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center (ECBC) and contracting firm SAIC are answering the Army's call for more green technologies to be developed by partnering to create the Tactical Garbage to Energy Refinery (TGER) 2.0 system. To do so, ECBC and SAIC have entered into a cooperative research and development agreement - an agreement between a government agency and a private company - to work together on research and development to speed the commercialization of technology.
NEWS
November 12, 2006
THE ISSUE: -- The new, 56,000-square-foot Glenwood Community Center uses some of the latest in "green" building technology and design, including geothermal energy for heating and cooling and large windows to provide natural light. It is the first county-owned building to meet national standards for energy savings -- and it cost $13.8 million. How much of a priority should the county be putting on environmentally friendly design and technology in its buildings and infrastructure -- and how much of a premium should it be willing to pay?
NEWS
By Mary C. Schneidau and Mary C. Schneidau,SUN STAFF | June 18, 2004
Plans for an Annapolis recreation center are being modified after community residents weighed in with ideas for a building that city officials say is long overdue. The center, to be in Truxtun Park, is to replace the Annapolis Recreation Center on St. Mary's Street and is expected to house 70,000 to 90,000 square feet of courts, tracks, art studios and meeting and exercise rooms, said LeeAnn Plumer, city director of recreation and parks. Design plans should be finished next spring, and groundbreaking is expected in late summer next year, Plumer said.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,Sun reporter | June 20, 2008
Three days after Gov. Martin O'Malley announced a $1.1 billion initiative for the biotechnology industry, Comptroller Peter Franchot announced yesterday that he would advocate that the state pension fund to invest about $1 billion in life sciences and "green" technology such as renewable energy and environmentally sensitive building materials. Franchot, who is vice chairman of the Maryland State Retirement and Pension System, said he would recommend that about $500 million be invested in the biotechnology industry, particularly in Maryland.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun reporter | July 11, 2008
Attracted by the business potential of the growing interest in green technology, Howard County is starting a coalition of business leaders involved in the field to capitalize on the trend. Dubbed the "Green Business Council," the nine-member group represents a collaboration of Ken Ulman, Howard County executive, the county's Economic Development Authority, and the county's Office of Environmental Sustainability, according to an announcement by Ulman. "We know that green-collar jobs are growing nationwide, and one U.S. study predicts that the 8.5 million current jobs in renewable energy and energy efficiency industries could grow to as many as 40 million by 2030," Ulman said.
NEWS
September 9, 2007
ISSUE: A city employee has filed the first applications for a "green roof" and a front-yard rain barrel in Annapolis' Historic District. Chuck Weikel wants to grow a garden of drought-resistant grass on his roof, figuring it would cool his house more than the black rubber covering. The rain barrel would allow him to use captured rainwater for plants in his garden. Weikel, who lives on one of the city's most colorful, historic streets, will attend Tuesday's city Historic Preservation Commission as it takes up the question of whether allowing green construction can co-exist with its mission of protecting the city's Colonial heritage.
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,Special to The Sun | September 5, 2007
Chuck Weikel wants to grow a garden of drought-resistant grass on his roof, figuring it would cool his house more than the black rubber covering. While environmentalists are embracing "green roofs" on buildings, Weikel's home isn't ordinary: He lives on one of Annapolis' most colorful, historic streets. Weikel plans to stand before the city's Historic Preservation Commission next week with the first applications for a green roof and a front yard rain barrel in the Historic District, forcing the panel to take up the question of whether allowing green construction can co-exist with its mission of protecting the city's Colonial heritage.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2012
At one of Annapolis' public housing buildings last week, new solar panels on the roof collected energy to heat hot water for more than two dozen apartments below. Inside, a message scrawled on the wall asked whoever had been urinating in the hallway to knock it off. It seems an odd juxtaposition - high technology above, reeking hallways below - but the two are directly related. The outdated buildings of the cash-strapped housing authority made them prime targets for a company that has come up with an innovative business plan to capture renewable energy credits by spreading green technology - in this case, installing solar panels on the roofs of two public housing complexes at no charge.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2010
Howard County will add three electric buses that use an advanced technology — the first of its kind in an American public transit system — that lets the vehicles be recharged without plugging them into an outlet. County executive Ken Ulman announced that Howard Transit has received federal funding to acquire the full-size, lightweight buses for use on routes in and around Columbia. The buses use what is called an inductive charger that repowers the bus batteries without a physical connection.
NEWS
By From Sun news services | November 23, 2008
WASHINGTON - President-elect Barack Obama signaled yesterday that he will quickly seek a sweeping economic recovery plan likely to exceed the price tag of the $175 billion plan that he unveiled during the campaign. A "crisis of historic proportions" is gripping the nation, Obama said, and it calls for "a plan big enough to meet the challenges we face." Obama has asked his economic team to craft a plan to create 2.5 million jobs over the next two years, including some in the field of alternative energy - a two-year stimulus reaching further than his original one-year-plan.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun reporter | July 11, 2008
Attracted by the business potential of the growing interest in green technology, Howard County is starting a coalition of business leaders involved in the field to capitalize on the trend. Dubbed the "Green Business Council," the nine-member group represents a collaboration of Ken Ulman, Howard County executive, the county's Economic Development Authority, and the county's Office of Environmental Sustainability, according to an announcement by Ulman. "We know that green-collar jobs are growing nationwide, and one U.S. study predicts that the 8.5 million current jobs in renewable energy and energy efficiency industries could grow to as many as 40 million by 2030," Ulman said.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,Sun reporter | June 20, 2008
Three days after Gov. Martin O'Malley announced a $1.1 billion initiative for the biotechnology industry, Comptroller Peter Franchot announced yesterday that he would advocate that the state pension fund to invest about $1 billion in life sciences and "green" technology such as renewable energy and environmentally sensitive building materials. Franchot, who is vice chairman of the Maryland State Retirement and Pension System, said he would recommend that about $500 million be invested in the biotechnology industry, particularly in Maryland.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg and Janene Holzberg,Special to the Sun | May 9, 2008
The University of Maryland has invited 900 of its closest neighbors for light refreshments tomorrow to talk about the environmentally friendly building it plans to erect at its research farm in western Ellicott City. Postcard invitations to the informational session were recently mailed to residents of communities surrounding the school's 922-acre property, where the Central Maryland Research and Education Center has been since 1988. Eight-foot-wide banners proclaiming, "We're going Green in your neighborhood!"
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg and Janene Holzberg,Special to the Sun | May 9, 2008
The University of Maryland has invited 900 of its closest neighbors for light refreshments tomorrow to talk about the environmentally friendly building it plans to erect at its research farm in western Ellicott City. Postcard invitations to the informational session were recently mailed to residents of communities surrounding the school's 922-acre property, where the Central Maryland Research and Education Center has been since 1988. Eight-foot-wide banners proclaiming, "We're going Green in your neighborhood!"
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 24, 2008
Baltimore Green Week has branched out over five years to include an array of issues under its environmental umbrella. According to program director Carol Silldorff, the organization began with a group of people interested in environmentally friendly building methods in the city. "Over the years," she said, "it has grown immensely. ... No longer is it at all connected to one issue." That much is clear from the schedule of events, which kicks off with a reception tomorrow at the Walters Art Museum and gets rolling Saturday with the fifth annual EcoFestival, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. in Druid Hill Park.
NEWS
September 12, 2007
ISSUE: A city employee has filed the first applications for a "green roof" and a front-yard rain barrel in Annapolis' historic district. Chuck Weikel wants to grow a garden of drought-resistant grass on his roof, figuring it would cool his house more than the black rubber covering. The rain barrel would allow him to use captured rainwater for plants in his garden. Weikel was expected to attend last night's city Historic Preservation Commission meeting as it took up the question of whether green construction can coexist with the mission of protecting the city's Colonial heritage.
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