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By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2011
A knock rarely brings the owner to the front door of Stemmer House. It is more likely that she will emerge to greet you from her gardens, wearing her trademark galoshes, tool belt, work gloves and sun hat. Though Barbara Holdridge has lived in this historic Baltimore County home for nearly 40 years, it is her gardens that demand her time and attention. More than six of the 27 acres that surround the home are formally landscaped, and if they don't need to be weeded, they need to be watered.
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By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2013
Behind the gates of a community in Green Spring Valley is an enclave of estate homes, including the European-style mansion that is home to Alan Klatsky, president of Prestige Development, Inc. and Klatsky Homes. The soft-spoken land developer, designer and builder welcomes guests at his door, then steps aside to reveal an open interior reminiscent of an embassy or art gallery. Light from windows on the landing of a wrought-iron staircase floods the interior, the sunshine highlighting the richness of silk-brocaded draperies.
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BUSINESS
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and Michelle Deal-Zimmerman,Sun reporter | September 9, 2007
A sweeping staircase leading to a ballroom and stage. A stone terrace overlooking a sparkling pool. Plus a billiards room, two family rooms and six fireplaces. There's living large, and then there's living grand. The 12,000-square-foot home of Dr. Donald E. Wilson and his wife, Patricia, is an excellent example of the latter. The couple live in Green Spring Valley, which is known for its estate-sized homes, but the Wilson house, which took two years to build, is significant for its features and design.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2013
Richard A. Moore, former owner of Gaylord Brooks Realty who developed 65 communities throughout Maryland, died Oct. 4 of brain cancer at his Monkton home. He was 78. The son of a bookbinder and a homemaker, Richard Allan Moore was born in Baltimore and raised in Towson. A 1953 graduate of St. Paul's School, Mr. Moore earned a bachelor's degree in 1958 from Washington & Lee University. An accomplished athlete who played football, basketball and lacrosse, he was selected a third-team All American in lacrosse.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella | lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | April 8, 2010
One of the Baltimore area's most historically significant residences is headed for a foreclosure auction today, more than two years after owner and prominent businessman Stephen A. Geppi put it up for sale for $7.7 million amid the slumping housing market. The mid-19th-century mansion in Green Spring Valley known as Cliffeholme, with eight bedrooms and nine fireplaces, is scheduled for sale at the Baltimore County Courthouse with an outstanding mortgage debt of $3.25 million, court records show.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella | lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | April 8, 2010
The Baltimore County mansion known as Cliffeholme, built in the mid-19th century and owned by businessman Stephen A. Geppi, was bought back at a foreclosure sale Thursday by the mortgage lender. A trustee for lender Bank of America bid $2.8 million for the nearly 14,000-square-foot residence on 9 acres in Green Spring Valley. Geppi and his wife, Melinda, who bought the property in 2004 for $4.8 million, defaulted on the loan in February 2009 and owed $3.2 million on the mortgage, according to court documents.
NEWS
October 7, 1999
RATHER THAN get further bogged down in a protracted legal battle over the desire of the chairman of Rite Aid Corp. to land a helicopter near his home, Baltimore County could help solve the problem by building a few helipads. It's a matter of economic development, particularly for executives who travel to their jobs by helicopter rather than car.Convenience is at the heart of this issue. Martin Grass wanted a landing site close to his Green Spring Valley home so he could commute to Rite Aid headquarters in Camp Hill, Pa.The county Board of Appeals has ruled that Mr. Grass' use of a farm field near his home as a helipad violates zoning laws.
CLASSIFIED
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2012
The house that ranks as the Baltimore region's priciest sale in August is, in the words of the sellers' real estate agent, "understated" — the sort of home that doesn't smack you in the eye with its high-end glitz. The four-bedroom home on Golf Course Road West in Owings Mills, which sits on 2 acres near Green Spring Valley Hunt Club's golf course, changed hands for just over $3.1 million. "It wasn't a McMansion," said Linda Corbin of Prudential Homesale YWGC Realty, the listing agent.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,Sun reporter | February 19, 2007
The dogs of the Green Spring Valley Hounds hunt club are trained to chase a fox for 10 miles or more, pursued by a pack of galloping, hurdling horses over endless Baltimore County farmland. But even after a winter storm has kept them cooped up for a week in the height of fox-hunting season, the hounds still won't so much as step in front of huntsman John Tabachka without his consent. Proof positive that in a sport that caters to the upper crust of the horsey set, the best-mannered creatures are still the dogs.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | November 10, 2000
In a high-stakes battle over development in the Green Spring Valley, the developers of a proposed office complex on Falls Road accused a Baltimore County councilman yesterday of blocking the project in exchange for a campaign contribution. Lawyers for the owners of Greenspring Racquet Club alleged in Baltimore County Circuit Court that Councilman T. Bryan McIntire accepted a $3,000 campaign contribution from an "ardent opponent" of the project a few months before he introduced a measure that killed it. Robert H. Freilich, a lawyer for William and Loretta Hirshfeld, told Judge John F. Fader II that the contribution June 19, 1998, was made by J. Patrick Mullan, whose Lutherville real estate company they called an "economic competitor."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2013
Peter Young Martin, a former golf professional and Green Spring Valley Hunt Club champion, died of a respiratory illness March 31 at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The Owings Mills resident was 64. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of John William Young Martin and Nancy Byers Martin. He was raised at the family home, Snow Hill Farm, site of the Maryland Hunt Cup point-to-point race in the Worthington Valley in Baltimore County. Mr. Martin attended the Gilman Lower School and was a 1966 graduate of Avon Old Farms School in Avon, Conn.
CLASSIFIED
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2012
The house that ranks as the Baltimore region's priciest sale in August is, in the words of the sellers' real estate agent, "understated" — the sort of home that doesn't smack you in the eye with its high-end glitz. The four-bedroom home on Golf Course Road West in Owings Mills, which sits on 2 acres near Green Spring Valley Hunt Club's golf course, changed hands for just over $3.1 million. "It wasn't a McMansion," said Linda Corbin of Prudential Homesale YWGC Realty, the listing agent.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2012
Peyton Skipwith Cochran Jr., a longtime Rouse Co. executive who helped develop shopping centers but was deeply interested in land preservation, died Thursday at Springwell Senior Living in Baltimore from complications of Alzheimer's and a stroke. He was 85. In addition to helping start two local groups that reflected his interest in the outdoors, Mr. Cochran — known as Skip — was active in fox hunting and steeplechasing. He was a partner in Arcadia Stable, owner of Buck Jakes, a horse that twice won the Maryland Hunt Cup and died at age 24 in January.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2011
A knock rarely brings the owner to the front door of Stemmer House. It is more likely that she will emerge to greet you from her gardens, wearing her trademark galoshes, tool belt, work gloves and sun hat. Though Barbara Holdridge has lived in this historic Baltimore County home for nearly 40 years, it is her gardens that demand her time and attention. More than six of the 27 acres that surround the home are formally landscaped, and if they don't need to be weeded, they need to be watered.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2011
Cary Wilson Jackson, a noted Maryland horseman, builder and developer who had been on the board of the Maryland Million Classic, died Feb. 7 in an automobile accident near White Sulphur Springs, W.Va. He was 88. At the time of the accident, Mr. Jackson was returning to his home in White Hall, Baltimore County, from Lexington, Ky., where he had sold a mare at the Keeneland horse sale. "Cary Jackson defined the term 'Maryland horseman' at its best. He did it all," said Ross Peddicord, former Baltimore Sun racing writer who is now executive director of the Maryland Horse Industry Board.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella | lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | April 8, 2010
The Baltimore County mansion known as Cliffeholme, built in the mid-19th century and owned by businessman Stephen A. Geppi, was bought back at a foreclosure sale Thursday by the mortgage lender. A trustee for lender Bank of America bid $2.8 million for the nearly 14,000-square-foot residence on 9 acres in Green Spring Valley. Geppi and his wife, Melinda, who bought the property in 2004 for $4.8 million, defaulted on the loan in February 2009 and owed $3.2 million on the mortgage, according to court documents.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | August 11, 1999
Save water. Use oil paint. The difference between day trading and Russian roulette is somewhat better odds of survival in the latter game. The Republicans compromised with the Republicans on the tax package. They may ban fox hunting as cruel and inhumane in Scotland, England and Wales, but fox-hugging British lefties will never muzzle the hounds in Green Spring Valley.
NEWS
March 6, 2007
Sarah P. Stump, a lifelong horsewoman who worked with the physically challenged, died Friday of complications from kidney disease at her Owings Mills home. She was 72. Sarah Price was born in Baltimore and raised in Owings Mills. She was a 1952 graduate of Garrison Forest School and attended Strayer's Business College. She worked for several years as a legal secretary for a Baltimore law firm. Mrs. Stump began riding and showing horses as a youngster. She enjoyed fox hunting and was a member of the Green Spring Valley Hounds and Green Spring Valley Hunt Club.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella | lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | April 8, 2010
One of the Baltimore area's most historically significant residences is headed for a foreclosure auction today, more than two years after owner and prominent businessman Stephen A. Geppi put it up for sale for $7.7 million amid the slumping housing market. The mid-19th-century mansion in Green Spring Valley known as Cliffeholme, with eight bedrooms and nine fireplaces, is scheduled for sale at the Baltimore County Courthouse with an outstanding mortgage debt of $3.25 million, court records show.
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