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By Tim Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
For some people, environmentalism is a lifelong passion. That would be true of Michael Beer, retired biophysics professor at Johns Hopkins University, who died Friday at age 88.  He was devoted to protecting and restoring the Jones Falls, the stream that runs through the heart of Baltimore, as well as one of its most popular tributaries, Stony Run. Rallying others to his cause, he founded the Jones Falls Watershed Association, which later merged...
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By Tim Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
For some people, environmentalism is a lifelong passion. That would be true of Michael Beer, retired biophysics professor at Johns Hopkins University, who died Friday at age 88.  He was devoted to protecting and restoring the Jones Falls, the stream that runs through the heart of Baltimore, as well as one of its most popular tributaries, Stony Run. Rallying others to his cause, he founded the Jones Falls Watershed Association, which later merged...
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EXPLORE
August 30, 2011
Towson University was scheduled to host the grand opening of its new College of Liberal Arts Building with a ceremony on Tuesday, Aug. 30. Officials said the $148 million structure is Towson University's first entirely new academic building in more than 30 years, and occupies the former site of the Lida Lee Tall building. The building is LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) silver certified, a designation that denotes environmentally friendly aspects in construction and energy efficiency.
FEATURES
By Karen Nitkin, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2012
With the scorching heat, derecho storms and power outages, keeping your home cool this summer is looking like a brutal challenge. Hundreds of thousands of homes in the Baltimore-Washington region lost power from the ferocious storm in late June. That was a bummer. But when temps soared past 100 degrees in the week that followed, what started as a bummer became much more serious. Indoor temperatures were stifling, making sleep nearly impossible and daily activities unbearable. Dozens of deaths nationwide were linked to the heat wave, including at least 20 in Maryland.
BUSINESS
December 15, 2009
Star Development Group of Columbia broke ground Monday for Starview Plaza, a $33 million student housing project at 8700 Baltimore Ave. in College Park. When complete in August 2011, the project will contain 172 residences providing housing for 669 undergraduate students at the University of Maryland, College Park plus 351 parking spaces, 9,500 square feet of retail space, 7,000 square feet for student amenities and a 10,000-square-foot green roof. A 94-unit, 369-bed first phase is slated to open by the end of 2010.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts , ed.gunts@baltsun.com | December 9, 2009
When the owners of Baltimore's Black Olive restaurant began formulating plans to build an inn one block away, the word "green" still referred to a color more than an environmental movement. But in the 10 years that the project has been under development, builders have learned plenty about "eco-friendly" design, including which green features are mostly marketing gimmicks and which really can have a lasting impact. When it opens next year, the $6 million Inn at the Black Olive won't be the first local hotel and marketplace with a green roof or bamboo woodwork.
ENTERTAINMENT
by b staff | @bthesite and b free daily | March 24, 2010
For b's inaugural "10 People to Watch Under 30" edition, we looked for those who inspired us, challenged traditional thinking, weren't happy with the status quo. What we found were Baltimoreans committed to our city in various arenas, from the arts and sports to education, volunteerism and community activism. Here's our "10 People to Watch" class of 2010. JEREMY FREDERICK, 26 | Mount Vernon | green-roof guru: If Jeremy Frederick had his way, the Baltimore skyline would be dotted green.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2010
A busy street in downtown Baltimore might be the last place one would expect to see a bocce game going on. But just before noon Friday, with traffic rumbling by, Nicole Reedy and Jeff Stump squared off for a friendly match on a swath of grass laid down where cars would normally be parked in front of their office on West Franklin Street. A few feet away, co-workers and clients chatted while sipping wine and soft drinks under a green-roofed lean-to. It was another PARK(ing) Day — an annual event held across the planet to promote creation of more open space in urban areas.
TRAVEL
By MICHELLE DEAL-ZIMMERMAN and MICHELLE DEAL-ZIMMERMAN,michelle.deal@baltsun.com | January 3, 2010
Last week it was weather. It may be again this weekend. But the intervening week highlighted yet another travel concern: terrorism. It's not really new, but it has been a bit off the radar for some. Travelers who have become accustomed to airport security procedures like removing shoes may have forgotten the genesis of the baring of the feet: a man named Richard Reid who attempted to blow up a flight from Paris to Miami by igniting a bomb in his shoe. He was overpowered by the flight crew and passengers, foiling the December 2001 attack.
FEATURES
By Karen Nitkin, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2012
With the scorching heat, derecho storms and power outages, keeping your home cool this summer is looking like a brutal challenge. Hundreds of thousands of homes in the Baltimore-Washington region lost power from the ferocious storm in late June. That was a bummer. But when temps soared past 100 degrees in the week that followed, what started as a bummer became much more serious. Indoor temperatures were stifling, making sleep nearly impossible and daily activities unbearable. Dozens of deaths nationwide were linked to the heat wave, including at least 20 in Maryland.
EXPLORE
August 30, 2011
Towson University was scheduled to host the grand opening of its new College of Liberal Arts Building with a ceremony on Tuesday, Aug. 30. Officials said the $148 million structure is Towson University's first entirely new academic building in more than 30 years, and occupies the former site of the Lida Lee Tall building. The building is LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) silver certified, a designation that denotes environmentally friendly aspects in construction and energy efficiency.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2010
A busy street in downtown Baltimore might be the last place one would expect to see a bocce game going on. But just before noon Friday, with traffic rumbling by, Nicole Reedy and Jeff Stump squared off for a friendly match on a swath of grass laid down where cars would normally be parked in front of their office on West Franklin Street. A few feet away, co-workers and clients chatted while sipping wine and soft drinks under a green-roofed lean-to. It was another PARK(ing) Day — an annual event held across the planet to promote creation of more open space in urban areas.
ENTERTAINMENT
by b staff | @bthesite and b free daily | March 24, 2010
For b's inaugural "10 People to Watch Under 30" edition, we looked for those who inspired us, challenged traditional thinking, weren't happy with the status quo. What we found were Baltimoreans committed to our city in various arenas, from the arts and sports to education, volunteerism and community activism. Here's our "10 People to Watch" class of 2010. JEREMY FREDERICK, 26 | Mount Vernon | green-roof guru: If Jeremy Frederick had his way, the Baltimore skyline would be dotted green.
TRAVEL
By MICHELLE DEAL-ZIMMERMAN and MICHELLE DEAL-ZIMMERMAN,michelle.deal@baltsun.com | January 3, 2010
Last week it was weather. It may be again this weekend. But the intervening week highlighted yet another travel concern: terrorism. It's not really new, but it has been a bit off the radar for some. Travelers who have become accustomed to airport security procedures like removing shoes may have forgotten the genesis of the baring of the feet: a man named Richard Reid who attempted to blow up a flight from Paris to Miami by igniting a bomb in his shoe. He was overpowered by the flight crew and passengers, foiling the December 2001 attack.
BUSINESS
December 15, 2009
Star Development Group of Columbia broke ground Monday for Starview Plaza, a $33 million student housing project at 8700 Baltimore Ave. in College Park. When complete in August 2011, the project will contain 172 residences providing housing for 669 undergraduate students at the University of Maryland, College Park plus 351 parking spaces, 9,500 square feet of retail space, 7,000 square feet for student amenities and a 10,000-square-foot green roof. A 94-unit, 369-bed first phase is slated to open by the end of 2010.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts , ed.gunts@baltsun.com | December 9, 2009
When the owners of Baltimore's Black Olive restaurant began formulating plans to build an inn one block away, the word "green" still referred to a color more than an environmental movement. But in the 10 years that the project has been under development, builders have learned plenty about "eco-friendly" design, including which green features are mostly marketing gimmicks and which really can have a lasting impact. When it opens next year, the $6 million Inn at the Black Olive won't be the first local hotel and marketplace with a green roof or bamboo woodwork.
BUSINESS
By Susan Canfora and Susan Canfora,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 19, 1999
Inside the front door of their new home, with its breathtaking view of Assawoman Bay and the Ocean City skyline, is a sign that says, "Witt's End." But it's not meant to be negative. In a tongue-in-cheek way, it's celebratory. Now that Dave and Barbara Witt have built a home in the quickly developing southern section of Ocean Pines, this is it, their last residence. The house they will enjoy in their retirement. Literally, Witt's End. Located on Salt Grass Road, in a section of the Pines known as Salt Grass Cove, the design is a reversed floor plan, with guest bedrooms and a just-back-from-the-beach "sand room" on the first floor and the great room, kitchen, dining room and master bedroom upstairs.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 11, 2008
Retailers are typically obsessed with what to put under their roofs, not on them. Yet the nation's biggest store chains are coming to see their immense, flat roofs as an untapped resource. In recent months, chains including Wal-Mart Stores, Kohl's, Safeway and Whole Foods Market have installed solar panels on roofs of their stores to generate electricity on a large scale. One reason is that they are racing to beat a Dec. 31 deadline to gain tax advantages for these projects. So far, most chains have outfitted fewer than 10 percent of their stores.
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