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Green Ridge State Forest

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By Martin Weil, The Washington Post | October 17, 2010
Amid the oaks and hickories of the Green Ridge State Forest, a 46,000-acre tract of wooded slopes and stream valleys in Western Maryland, all may not be as idyllic and remote from the ills of modern civilization as geography might suggest. In a statement, the Maryland Natural Resources Police said it charged 10 people with drug violations on a recent Saturday. In addition the agency said, during the first nine months of this year, it made more than 120 arrests on charges of illegal drug use. In response, Natural Resources Police said, it will begin an enhanced enforcement effort to curtail illegal drug activity in the forest, about a two-hour drive from the Baltimore area.
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NEWS
By Martin Weil, The Washington Post | October 17, 2010
Amid the oaks and hickories of the Green Ridge State Forest, a 46,000-acre tract of wooded slopes and stream valleys in Western Maryland, all may not be as idyllic and remote from the ills of modern civilization as geography might suggest. In a statement, the Maryland Natural Resources Police said it charged 10 people with drug violations on a recent Saturday. In addition the agency said, during the first nine months of this year, it made more than 120 arrests on charges of illegal drug use. In response, Natural Resources Police said, it will begin an enhanced enforcement effort to curtail illegal drug activity in the forest, about a two-hour drive from the Baltimore area.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | November 8, 1991
Campfires, cigarette smoking and off-road vehicles were banned in Allegany County's Green Ridge State Forest yesterday, where firefighters battled two forest fires as tinderbox conditions set the stage for more.The Maryland Emergency Management Agency has banned openburning throughout Allegany and Garrett counties becauseof the rising danger of forest fires."The woods from the lower Shore to Garrett County are extremely dry," said Deputy State Fire Marshal Robert B. Thomas Jr."We have really not seen any measureable amounts of rainfall throughout Maryland in over six weeks, and in Western Maryland for longer than that," he said.
SPORTS
September 24, 1992
Today-Saturday: $291,000 Bassmaster BP Top 10 tournament, Smallwood State Park near Waldorf. Launch daily between 6:30 and 7 a.m. Weigh-ins daily starting about 2 p.m.Today-Sunday: Sunfest Boat Show at Shantytown Village in West Ocean City. Show opens daily at noon. No admission. More than 100 boats on display. Call (410) 213-1121.Today-Sunday: Penn's Landing in-the-water boat show, Penn's Landing Boat Basin in Philadelphia. Call (215) 449-9910.Saturday-Sunday: DNR-sponsored Potomac paddling adventure, family canoe trip at Green Ridge State Forest in Allegany County.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 9, 2004
The 35-year-old turkey hunter who was fatally shot by his hunting partner Saturday in Green Ridge State Forest has been identified as Stamos Courpas of Fairfax, Va., according to the Department of Natural Resources. Two other hunters were wounded in unrelated shooting mishaps over the weekend, a third was injured in a fall from a tree, and another apparently got lost in a state forest. Courpas, a software engineer who emigrated from Greece to earn degrees from Loyola College in Maryland, had been a hunter for several years and was out last weekend with Charles Lepovetski of Ranson, W.Va.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,SUN STAFF | November 25, 1995
LITTLE ORLEANS -- Ed Harmon arrived at Green Ridge State Forest from Pasadena well before noon yesterday, parked his 25-foot camper along the slope of a snow-dusted ridge, and waited.The 40-year-old corrections officer was looking for his buddies from the Baltimore area to show up with their hunting and camping gear -- and even their children -- to help perpetuate a tradition that, for some, goes back generations: hunting at Green Ridge State Forest.The opening of Maryland's firearms hunting season today will attract about 3,000 hunters to the 38,811-acre forest in Allegany County and transform the usually serene woods into bustling villages of tents and campers -- "tent cities," as park rangers call them.
FEATURES
By Tim Wheeler | December 9, 2011
In what some see as a critical test of a recent Smart Growth law, environmental groups and some property owners have filed suit to overturn the recent decision by Queen Anne's County's commissioners to zone 525 acres of Eastern Shore farmland for development. The suit, filed Thursday in Centreville, charges that the commissioners violated state law Nov. 8 in narrowly approving rezoning of four farm tracts, two of them in the headwaters of the Wye River and one in the Choptank River watershed.
NEWS
May 10, 2006
The fight against sprawl in Maryland is so uphill that any victory deserves to be heralded. Such is the case with the decision last week of an Allegany County Circuit Court judge to send approval of the Terrapin Run project back to the county for reconsideration. Terrapin Run would put 4,300 homes for long-distance commuters on 935 acres by the Green Ridge State Forest 50 miles west of Hagerstown. As we noted last week, the project was approved by a split vote of Allegany's Board of Zoning Appeals, despite its land being zoned for agriculture and conservation.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | May 1, 2012
A controversial big housing development in western Maryland that was reported last fall to be shelved apparently has new life. Terrapin Run, which sparked lawsuits and legislation to strengthen the state's Smart Growth laws, is back on track, Columbia developer Michael Carnock told WCBC radio in Cumberland.  He said he hopes to proceed with his original plan to build 4,000 townhomes in eastern Allegany County. The developer had reportedly been trying to sell the 935-acre site near the Green Ridge State Forest, and Allegany's county commissioners agreed to drop their lawsuit against the state planning and environment departments to aid a sale, according to the radio station.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker | September 29, 1991
An in-house analysis of the American Fishing Tackle Manufacturers Association's Super Outdoor Market held in California last month found that fishermen are becoming harder for manufacturers to catch.The reason? In the simplest terms, it's money -- or the absence of it in the consumer's pocket.After 10 years of rapid development in fishing gear, consumers apparently are less likely to buy the latest rage in reels, rods or electronics."You are going to see simplicity and quality on product coming back," Denny Stulc of Berkley Inc., said.
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