Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGreen Revolution
IN THE NEWS

Green Revolution

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 27, 2014
Regarding your recent editorial on the impact of climate change on the economy, I agree that resolving the issue of climate change would not be an economic failure but rather a success ( "The economic climate ," June 24). Aside from the fact that if climate change is ignored the situation of the economy will become an issue of infinitely less importance than the condition of our planet, exploring solutions to the problem will open many opportunities to improve the economy. At current rates of consumption, there is an estimated 50 years of oil left in Earth's crust.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 27, 2014
Regarding your recent editorial on the impact of climate change on the economy, I agree that resolving the issue of climate change would not be an economic failure but rather a success ( "The economic climate ," June 24). Aside from the fact that if climate change is ignored the situation of the economy will become an issue of infinitely less importance than the condition of our planet, exploring solutions to the problem will open many opportunities to improve the economy. At current rates of consumption, there is an estimated 50 years of oil left in Earth's crust.
Advertisement
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 3, 1991
The farmers of the world, harvesting the abundant crops of the Green Revolution, have so far defied Malthusian predictions that population growth would outrun agricultural production and consign much of humanity to chronic famine.But scientists say the diverse varieties of traditional crops and wild plants they need to breed more productive new strains are in jeopardy.In the field, farmers are abandoning them in favor of the new high-yield varieties.Wild strains of agricultural plants are disappearing as development destroys their habitat.
EXPLORE
By Diane Pajak | June 6, 2011
At the Columbia Association's Athletic Club, members are running the facility - in a sense. The 28 Green Revolution bikes installed in November 2010 allow members to get an intense workout while storing the renewable energy created during their cycling. A one-hour spinning class with one instructor and 27 participants has the potential to generate more than 2,000 watts per hour - enough power to light more than 100 compact fluorescent lights. After about three months of use, cyclists had generated an amount of energy equivalent to powering five homes for one day or brewing 5,585 cups of coffee, and captured 321 pounds of carbon dioxide (greenhouse gas)
EXPLORE
By Diane Pajak | June 6, 2011
At the Columbia Association's Athletic Club, members are running the facility - in a sense. The 28 Green Revolution bikes installed in November 2010 allow members to get an intense workout while storing the renewable energy created during their cycling. A one-hour spinning class with one instructor and 27 participants has the potential to generate more than 2,000 watts per hour - enough power to light more than 100 compact fluorescent lights. After about three months of use, cyclists had generated an amount of energy equivalent to powering five homes for one day or brewing 5,585 cups of coffee, and captured 321 pounds of carbon dioxide (greenhouse gas)
FEATURES
By George D. Moffett III and George D. Moffett III,Christian Science Monitor | July 8, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Can the planet Earth, regions of which are already sagging under the weight of its 5 billion passengers, sustain 5 billion or 10 billion more?By the conventional wisdom, the answer is a resounding no. A majority of demographers and environmentalists say the earth's soils, forests, and water resources are already being depleted at a dangerous rate. If population doubles or triples, they warn, the human load could produce an ecological nightmare.But a sturdy group of demographic contrarians takes exception, scoffing at the notion that population growth will mortgage the world's future.
NEWS
By Dennis T. Avery | June 11, 1996
CHURCHVILLE, Va. -- The United Nations has another extravaganza coming your way: a global food summit.You may remember the United Nation's big Cairo Population Conference in 1994. It raised $17 billion in international pledges to ''manage'' world population growth -- without mentioning to anybody that Third World birth rates had already dropped three-fourths of the way to stability since 1965.Now comes the sequel, the World Food Summit, which will take place in Rome this November. Preliminary ''hearings'' are already under way in Washington and other world capitals.
NEWS
By Kristi Heim and Sandi Doughton and Kristi Heim and Sandi Doughton,Seattle Times | September 17, 2006
Hoping to reduce hunger and poverty by sparking a "green revolution" in Africa, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has announced a new partnership with the Rockefeller Foundation aimed at dramatically increasing productivity of small farms in the poorest region of the world. The project faces a challenge to succeed in a region characterized by harsh and highly varied conditions, while avoiding pitfalls of earlier efforts that poisoned some ecosystems with fertilizers and pesticides and drained rivers and wetlands for irrigation.
NEWS
By Ken Hackett | October 18, 2009
September saw the passing of Norman Borlaug, the father of the Green Revolution that lifted millions of people out of hunger through the production of high-yield varieties of wheat. In the four decades since he began his work, we have made significant progress in the fight against global hunger. Thanks in no small part to U.S. foreign assistance and the generosity of American citizens, the percentage of chronically hungry people declined from 37 percent of the world's population in the 1960s to about 13 percent today.
NEWS
By DONALD R. MORRIS | July 27, 1994
Virtually all experts insist the biosphere can raise -- is raising -- enough food to feed the global population; the problem is not one of supply, but of distribution. And, all distribution problems aside, the experts insist the production of food can stay well ahead of the population expansion for some time to come.There are two basic approaches to agriculture; monoculture and polyculture. Monoculture prevails in Europe and America, and polyculture in Asia, Africa and most Third World countries.
NEWS
By Firmin DeBrabander | June 2, 2011
What if "green" cars made pollution worse, not better? What if they increased greenhouse gas emissions instead of decreasing them? Preposterous, you say? Well, consider what's happened in Sweden. Through generous subsidies, Sweden aggressively pushed its citizens to trade in their old cars for energy-efficient replacements (hybrids, clean diesel vehicles, cars that run on ethanol). Sweden has been so successful in this initiative that it leads the world in per-capita sales of "green" cars.
NEWS
By Ken Hackett | October 18, 2009
September saw the passing of Norman Borlaug, the father of the Green Revolution that lifted millions of people out of hunger through the production of high-yield varieties of wheat. In the four decades since he began his work, we have made significant progress in the fight against global hunger. Thanks in no small part to U.S. foreign assistance and the generosity of American citizens, the percentage of chronically hungry people declined from 37 percent of the world's population in the 1960s to about 13 percent today.
NEWS
By Dan Gibbard and Dan Gibbard,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 15, 2007
BLAIR, Wis. -- Even in the fringe world of alternative fuels, vegetable oil has mostly remained on the margins, the domain of a few do-it-yourselfers who have rigged their diesels to run on old fryer fat, making the rounds of local burger joints to fill their tanks. But the veggie power movement is about to stick one greasy toe into the mainstream, as a company in this western Wisconsin town prepares to open what its owners believe is the first recycling and filling station for waste vegetable oil in the Midwest, and one of just a couple in the nation.
NEWS
By Kristi Heim and Sandi Doughton and Kristi Heim and Sandi Doughton,Seattle Times | September 17, 2006
Hoping to reduce hunger and poverty by sparking a "green revolution" in Africa, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has announced a new partnership with the Rockefeller Foundation aimed at dramatically increasing productivity of small farms in the poorest region of the world. The project faces a challenge to succeed in a region characterized by harsh and highly varied conditions, while avoiding pitfalls of earlier efforts that poisoned some ecosystems with fertilizers and pesticides and drained rivers and wetlands for irrigation.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Heather Dewar and Sun Staff | September 27, 2000
Fourth of five articles ANZHEN, China -- Nitrogen fertilizer has lifted the yoke off Hua Xijin's shoulders. Before the "green revolution" came to China, it took roughly 6 tons of river mud to fertilize a rice paddy small enough to fit in the corner of a football field. Hua carried the mud on his back, 130 pounds at a time, in bamboo baskets lashed to a wooden pole. Now 58-year-old Hua spends about a week each planting season sprinkling his field with hundreds of pounds of chemical fertilizer, leaving plenty of time for playing mah-jong or fishing in a nearby river.
NEWS
By Dennis T. Avery | June 11, 1996
CHURCHVILLE, Va. -- The United Nations has another extravaganza coming your way: a global food summit.You may remember the United Nation's big Cairo Population Conference in 1994. It raised $17 billion in international pledges to ''manage'' world population growth -- without mentioning to anybody that Third World birth rates had already dropped three-fourths of the way to stability since 1965.Now comes the sequel, the World Food Summit, which will take place in Rome this November. Preliminary ''hearings'' are already under way in Washington and other world capitals.
NEWS
By Firmin DeBrabander | June 2, 2011
What if "green" cars made pollution worse, not better? What if they increased greenhouse gas emissions instead of decreasing them? Preposterous, you say? Well, consider what's happened in Sweden. Through generous subsidies, Sweden aggressively pushed its citizens to trade in their old cars for energy-efficient replacements (hybrids, clean diesel vehicles, cars that run on ethanol). Sweden has been so successful in this initiative that it leads the world in per-capita sales of "green" cars.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Heather Dewar and Sun Staff | September 27, 2000
Fourth of five articles ANZHEN, China -- Nitrogen fertilizer has lifted the yoke off Hua Xijin's shoulders. Before the "green revolution" came to China, it took roughly 6 tons of river mud to fertilize a rice paddy small enough to fit in the corner of a football field. Hua carried the mud on his back, 130 pounds at a time, in bamboo baskets lashed to a wooden pole. Now 58-year-old Hua spends about a week each planting season sprinkling his field with hundreds of pounds of chemical fertilizer, leaving plenty of time for playing mah-jong or fishing in a nearby river.
NEWS
By DONALD R. MORRIS | July 27, 1994
Virtually all experts insist the biosphere can raise -- is raising -- enough food to feed the global population; the problem is not one of supply, but of distribution. And, all distribution problems aside, the experts insist the production of food can stay well ahead of the population expansion for some time to come.There are two basic approaches to agriculture; monoculture and polyculture. Monoculture prevails in Europe and America, and polyculture in Asia, Africa and most Third World countries.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.