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By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to The Sun | March 30, 1994
Q: What is the difference between green onions and scallions? How do I know which part to use?A: There is a slight difference between green onions and scallions and that is their size due to maturity. Scallion is the name for the immature plant of the white onion, which is pulled before the bulb formation. It is a broad term that encompasses many members of the onion family, such as young leeks, young shallots, or young spring or green onions. In a loose sense, green onions, spring onions and scallions are considered to be the same.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By John Thomas, For The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
Wings are the classic football appetizer. The usual flavor combination applied to wings is a buttery hot sauce and a salad dressing for dunking the wings. Nothing wrong with that. But if you want to take your tailgate to a new level, give these wings a try. The rich spicy heat from the habanero peppers along with the Jamaican jerk flavors of allspice, green onions, cinnamon, thyme and nutmeg really make these wings stand out. The nice thing about this recipe is that you can do most of the work the day before the game by placing your chicken in the marinade overnight and grilling it when you get to the stadium (or to your backyard grill)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By John Thomas, For The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
Wings are the classic football appetizer. The usual flavor combination applied to wings is a buttery hot sauce and a salad dressing for dunking the wings. Nothing wrong with that. But if you want to take your tailgate to a new level, give these wings a try. The rich spicy heat from the habanero peppers along with the Jamaican jerk flavors of allspice, green onions, cinnamon, thyme and nutmeg really make these wings stand out. The nice thing about this recipe is that you can do most of the work the day before the game by placing your chicken in the marinade overnight and grilling it when you get to the stadium (or to your backyard grill)
NEWS
By Bill Daley and Bill Daley,Chicago Tribune | February 13, 2008
Soup used to be an all-day, slowly simmered production. No more; today's fast pace won't allow it. Fortunately, the tinny, salty broths and soup bases of the past are being replaced by higher quality, tastier products with far less sodium than before. This quick Asian-style dish is satisfying with flavor accents you might associate more with a stir-fry than a soup. Bill Daley writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis. Quick Asian Shrimp Soup Makes 2 servings -- Total time: 33 minutes 2 tablespoons oil 3 cloves garlic, minced 2 green onions, minced, plus more for garnish, sliced 1 piece (1-inch long)
NEWS
By Bill Daley and Bill Daley,Chicago Tribune | February 13, 2008
Soup used to be an all-day, slowly simmered production. No more; today's fast pace won't allow it. Fortunately, the tinny, salty broths and soup bases of the past are being replaced by higher quality, tastier products with far less sodium than before. This quick Asian-style dish is satisfying with flavor accents you might associate more with a stir-fry than a soup. Bill Daley writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis. Quick Asian Shrimp Soup Makes 2 servings -- Total time: 33 minutes 2 tablespoons oil 3 cloves garlic, minced 2 green onions, minced, plus more for garnish, sliced 1 piece (1-inch long)
NEWS
By ANNETTE GOOCH and ANNETTE GOOCH,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | July 4, 1999
"Eat your peas!" is seldom heard at the table when the subject of discussion is fresh petits pois, a French variety renowned for the delicacy and tiny size of the shelled peas (about half the size of English ones). Sweet, tender baby peas (even if they're not authentic petits pois) appeal to most children, especially if they've helped with the shelling. Another good reason for enlisting the aid of small hands: The smaller the peas, the more pea pods to be shelled. Spring and early summer are prime time for fresh peas, a cool-weather crop.
NEWS
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | March 25, 2001
The first meal of the day is my favorite, and yet we rarely entertain at breakfast or brunch. The exception is when we have weekend guests. On Saturday or Sunday mornings of such visits, I love to make pancakes laced with fresh seasonal berries; pumpkin waffles; French toast garnished with bananas and maple syrup; or oatmeal with a topping of brown sugar, butter, raisins and lemon zest. And, of course, there are egg dishes: omelets, gratins and scrambled creations. Several days ago, when good friends came for a Friday-to-Sunday stay, I had the perfect opportunity to prepare a weekend brunch.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | September 16, 2001
For a light lunch that can be made ahead and transported, try a salad of tender baby spinach leaves, carrot ribbons and sliced green onions tossed in a light sesame and wine vinegar dressing. Pick up a roasted chicken and slice its breast meat to add to the salad. Sprinkle the salad with crispy fried ginger chips. To serve with it, a crusty baguette is perfect, and for dessert, pick up a pint of grapefruit sorbet and a basket of fresh blueberries. The delectable ginger chips are what make this salad distinctive.
NEWS
By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,Special to the Sun | March 10, 2002
Grapefruit, Lovage and Cucumber Salad; Lettuce and Mint Soup; Salmon with Leek-Tarragon Butter; Glazed Strawberry and Lemon Curd Tart. If you think the above is the menu of a trendy American restaurant, think again. You'll find these dishes in one of several modern Irish cookbooks. True, Irish cooks still make traditional dishes such as colcannon -- a cabbage and potato dish, shepherd's pie, and what we all think of as Irish cuisine -- corned beef and cabbage. But that's just the beginning.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 9, 2000
Next week a friend is planning to come for an overnight visit, and I am delighted to have the opportunity to plan a menu for such a small gathering. When entertaining no more than four, you can do last-minute dishes and not be so stressed. For our supper, I have decided to start with a light cream of watercress soup, followed by broiled lamb chops, a Potato and Herbed Cheese Galette and blanched asparagus. For dessert, there will be homemade dried cherry and ginger biscotti served with vanilla bean ice cream bought from a local store.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | May 9, 2007
Perhaps it is because they are among the first promising crops that pop out of the long-dead ground. Or maybe it is because my once--strong resistance to them was worn down by one of their biggest fans. For whatever reason, this spring I have become a fan of green onions. I used to call them scallions. But along with my conversion to green onions, I got an education regarding their names. The authentic scallion, I have learned, is a specific type of immature onion. Its bulb or bottom has straight sides and is not wider than the base of its leaves.
NEWS
By Adrienne Saunders and Adrienne Saunders,SUN STAFF | December 10, 2003
Planning a holiday party does not have to leave you shackled to the stove. To get out of the kitchen and enjoy the party requires just a little know-how from a party professional. Nicole Aloni's Cooking for Company (the Berkeley Publishing Group, 2003, $18.95) is a survival guide and quick-reference manual for home entertaining that makes crowd-friendly cooking a less formidable task. A veteran caterer, Aloni offers timesaving tips and preparation shortcuts to make entertaining easier for the home chef.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | April 28, 2002
A group from the Amherst College Gourmet Club assembled in my kitchen on a weekend afternoon, and after a discussion of the recipes we cooked together for a couple of hours. Afterward, we enjoyed the results of our chopping, slicing and dicing. For this year's menu, I chose simple dishes. For openers there were Blue Cheese, Tomato and Green Onion Tartlets offered with bowls of green and black olives. Grilled salmon fillets accompanied by a piquant cold mustard sauce were served with grilled asparagus spears and a gratin of potatoes.
NEWS
By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,Special to the Sun | March 10, 2002
Grapefruit, Lovage and Cucumber Salad; Lettuce and Mint Soup; Salmon with Leek-Tarragon Butter; Glazed Strawberry and Lemon Curd Tart. If you think the above is the menu of a trendy American restaurant, think again. You'll find these dishes in one of several modern Irish cookbooks. True, Irish cooks still make traditional dishes such as colcannon -- a cabbage and potato dish, shepherd's pie, and what we all think of as Irish cuisine -- corned beef and cabbage. But that's just the beginning.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | September 16, 2001
For a light lunch that can be made ahead and transported, try a salad of tender baby spinach leaves, carrot ribbons and sliced green onions tossed in a light sesame and wine vinegar dressing. Pick up a roasted chicken and slice its breast meat to add to the salad. Sprinkle the salad with crispy fried ginger chips. To serve with it, a crusty baguette is perfect, and for dessert, pick up a pint of grapefruit sorbet and a basket of fresh blueberries. The delectable ginger chips are what make this salad distinctive.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | May 13, 2001
Last week at a popular Italian restaurant in our small New England town, I ordered as a first course "pasta in brodo," which translates to "pasta in broth." The soup, made with chicken stock, had cheese-filled tortellini floating in it and a melange of vegetables including diced zucchini and carrots. Light yet satisfying, the delectable broth made a perfect opener for my meal. Several days later, I decided to make a spring version of this dish in my own kitchen. This classic Italian soup is based on homemade broth, but since I didn't have several hours to prepare stock, I opted for a shortcut.
FEATURES
By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | August 16, 2000
According to trend-watcher Harry Balzer, we Americans are giving up on side dishes. We'd like to spend 20 minutes, tops, preparing dinner, says Balzer, who studies consumers' eating habits for the NPD Group, a marketing information company in Port Washington, N.Y. I wouldn't question Balzer's data, but I would urge you to keep the salad course. You can make a great salad in five minutes or less, and that's time well spent. The salad shown here goes well with Mango Chicken that is pepped up with jalapeno chili.
NEWS
By Adrienne Saunders and Adrienne Saunders,SUN STAFF | December 10, 2003
Planning a holiday party does not have to leave you shackled to the stove. To get out of the kitchen and enjoy the party requires just a little know-how from a party professional. Nicole Aloni's Cooking for Company (the Berkeley Publishing Group, 2003, $18.95) is a survival guide and quick-reference manual for home entertaining that makes crowd-friendly cooking a less formidable task. A veteran caterer, Aloni offers timesaving tips and preparation shortcuts to make entertaining easier for the home chef.
NEWS
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | March 25, 2001
The first meal of the day is my favorite, and yet we rarely entertain at breakfast or brunch. The exception is when we have weekend guests. On Saturday or Sunday mornings of such visits, I love to make pancakes laced with fresh seasonal berries; pumpkin waffles; French toast garnished with bananas and maple syrup; or oatmeal with a topping of brown sugar, butter, raisins and lemon zest. And, of course, there are egg dishes: omelets, gratins and scrambled creations. Several days ago, when good friends came for a Friday-to-Sunday stay, I had the perfect opportunity to prepare a weekend brunch.
FEATURES
By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | August 16, 2000
According to trend-watcher Harry Balzer, we Americans are giving up on side dishes. We'd like to spend 20 minutes, tops, preparing dinner, says Balzer, who studies consumers' eating habits for the NPD Group, a marketing information company in Port Washington, N.Y. I wouldn't question Balzer's data, but I would urge you to keep the salad course. You can make a great salad in five minutes or less, and that's time well spent. The salad shown here goes well with Mango Chicken that is pepped up with jalapeno chili.
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