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Green Monster

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NEWS
July 8, 1994
For 32 years, a green monster has defined Ritchie Highway's approach to Glen Burnie. The shoebox-like structure just south of the Baltimore Beltway belongs to the Motor Vehicle Administration, the behemoth bureaucracy that issues driver's licenses, registration tags and decides who is fit to drive.The good news regarding the MVA headquarters is that the institutional green of the building will be replaced by a white facade, trimmed in red. The bad news, for the next year anyway: It is only part of a $4.4 million renovation that will keep the MVA's base in a constant state of flux until next June.
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SPORTS
By [ROCH KUBATKO] | July 13, 2008
A recap of the Orioles' 12-1 loss to the Red Sox last night: Back-to-back The Red Sox gave Orioles starter Radhames Liz a rude welcome in the first inning. Making his second career appearance at Fenway Park, Liz fell behind 2-0 on consecutive solo homers by J.D. Drew and Manny Ramirez. Both balls were hit to the opposite field. Drew cleared the Green Monster in left, and Ramirez reached the bullpen area in right. It was the 10th time this season that Boston hit back-to-back homers, and it happened after Liz retired the first two batters on ground balls.
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FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly | July 17, 1999
I had considered slipping out of town this weekend, but when a friend of mine with a house facing the ocean called to say my bed would be the floor, I thought better of the idea. As muggy as Baltimore may be, I'll stay right at home. I've had too many nights trying to bunk down in overcrowded vacation homes.I guess it goes without saying that a family vacation means just that -- no privacy, 12 to a room and dubious horizontal back support.In the early 1950s, we had a cute little house in Dewey Beach, Del., built atop the sand dunes.
SPORTS
By JEFF ZREBIEC | September 3, 2007
MISSED OPPORTUNITIES A day after being no-hit by Boston rookie Clay Buchholz, the Orioles found scoring chances more plentiful in the series finale but squandered most of them. Miguel Tejada, after tagging up, was thrown out at home by right fielder J.D. Drew in the fourth inning. Kevin Millar was caught too far off second base in the sixth after Melvin Mora's RBI single. In the eighth, Nick Markakis reached third base with one out but was stranded after Millar and Aubrey Huff struck out. CAUGHT IN A WEB To the Orioles, it must have looked like the Red Sox had more than nine players on the field.
SPORTS
By JEFF ZREBIEC | September 3, 2007
MISSED OPPORTUNITIES A day after being no-hit by Boston rookie Clay Buchholz, the Orioles found scoring chances more plentiful in the series finale but squandered most of them. Miguel Tejada, after tagging up, was thrown out at home by right fielder J.D. Drew in the fourth inning. Kevin Millar was caught too far off second base in the sixth after Melvin Mora's RBI single. In the eighth, Nick Markakis reached third base with one out but was stranded after Millar and Aubrey Huff struck out. CAUGHT IN A WEB To the Orioles, it must have looked like the Red Sox had more than nine players on the field.
SPORTS
By Bill Tanton | June 3, 1991
While the Orioles were winning three out of four from Boston over the weekend in Fenway Park, I was touring the O's half-built park at Camden Yards -- and continually being reminded of its similarities to Fenway."
SPORTS
By [ROCH KUBATKO] | July 13, 2008
A recap of the Orioles' 12-1 loss to the Red Sox last night: Back-to-back The Red Sox gave Orioles starter Radhames Liz a rude welcome in the first inning. Making his second career appearance at Fenway Park, Liz fell behind 2-0 on consecutive solo homers by J.D. Drew and Manny Ramirez. Both balls were hit to the opposite field. Drew cleared the Green Monster in left, and Ramirez reached the bullpen area in right. It was the 10th time this season that Boston hit back-to-back homers, and it happened after Liz retired the first two batters on ground balls.
SPORTS
By Buster Olney and Buster Olney,Sun Staff Writer | May 11, 1995
BOSTON -- When Sid Fernandez is in street clothes, the difference in his looks between this year and last is startling. Losing pound after pound will do that.When Fernandez is on the mound, he looks exactly the same as he did last year. Losing game after game will do that.Boston blasted Fernandez for six runs in 3 1/3 innings last night and beat the Orioles, 6-2, despite playing a horrendous defensive game.Red Sox first baseman MoVaughn hit his second homer in two nights, and shortstop John Valentin coaxed three walks and scored twice.
SPORTS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 10, 2003
Larry Lucchino, Boston Red Sox president, weaves his way through a Yawkey Way crowd 20 minutes before the start of a game. As he talks excitedly about the "perpetual street fair" going on around him, fans turn away from their cold draft beers to shake his hand and schmooze. He's the Pied Piper of Renovation. It has been 18 months since Boston welcomed a new Red Sox ownership group led by money manager John Henry. To the relief of baseball fans throughout New England, the new owners are trying to save Fenway Park, the team's home since 1912, rather than pursue a new stadium.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 30, 1999
David Hess originally had a live-action Roadrunner film in mind. Thankfully, he ended-up instead with a wryly insightful documentary into what makes a man do what common sense tells him not to."The Green Monster," airing at 10 p.m. tomorrow on MPT, Channels 22 and 67, as part of PBS's "P.O.V." documentary series, relates the tale of Art Arfons, a 74-year-old Midwesterner who's spent his adult life setting land-speed records in cars he designed and built himself. The film uses as its centerpiece Arfons' 1991 attempt to once again become the fastest man on wheels.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown | August 14, 2007
When we were kids, our parents would take us for a couple of weeks each summer to Harvey, a quiet village on a lake in the mostly rural Canadian province of New Brunswick. On afternoons when it rained in Harvey, my brother and I would hunt down a deck of cards for a game that we called "Canadian fish." Canadian fish played the same as go fish, with an important twist: We cheated. You were supposed to cheat. We palmed cards off the draw pile, and hid them up sleeves and down socks. We asked for cards we didn't hold; we denied holding those that we did. The more extravagant the violation, the better.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,SUN STAFF | April 27, 2005
BOSTON - B.J. Surhoff is admittedly not a patient person, so this season has been a test for the 19-year major leaguer. Surhoff, 40, comes to the ballpark every day not knowing if he'll be in the lineup or, if he is, where he'll be playing. Essentially a regular starter by the end of last year, Surhoff has started only seven of the Orioles' first 21 games this year - one at first base and six in left field. "Has it been tough? That's what I have," Surhoff said. "It's either I do that or go home.
NEWS
By Michael J. Goff | July 27, 2004
MONEY'S DECISIVE role in the 2004 presidential nomination campaign caps a trend that dates to the 1980s and is surely one of the most regrettable features of American politics today. As the Democratic and Republican national conventions bring the nomination campaign to its official close, the impact of money on voters' choices this November is clearer than ever. Money certainly was the first priority of the 10 announced Democratic contenders, long before they announced their candidacies.
SPORTS
By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | April 17, 2004
TORONTO - It was the kind of play you really can't practice. Tie score, two outs, bottom of the 10th inning, bases loaded, and a ball gets lined into the left-center field gap toward the Green Monster at Fenway Park. When it happened to the Orioles on Thursday night, the entire bench held its breath, because if that ball off Bill Mueller's bat falls in, the Boston Red Sox win. What's worse, it put left fielder Larry Bigbie and center fielder Luis Matos, two promising young outfielders, on a direct collision course.
SPORTS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 10, 2003
Larry Lucchino, Boston Red Sox president, weaves his way through a Yawkey Way crowd 20 minutes before the start of a game. As he talks excitedly about the "perpetual street fair" going on around him, fans turn away from their cold draft beers to shake his hand and schmooze. He's the Pied Piper of Renovation. It has been 18 months since Boston welcomed a new Red Sox ownership group led by money manager John Henry. To the relief of baseball fans throughout New England, the new owners are trying to save Fenway Park, the team's home since 1912, rather than pursue a new stadium.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | September 27, 2001
BOSTON - Being around the plate is fine for a pitcher until he begins catching too much of it. That's when an inning speeds out of control, an appearance is cut short and a game ultimately is lost. Making only his fourth major-league start, the Orioles' Rick Bauer learned this hard truth last night while the Boston Red Sox were sending 10 batters to the plate and scoring six runs in the third, producing a rare victory, 9-6, at Fenway Park. They had dropped 18 of 22. The Red Sox strung together six consecutive hits to break a 1-1 tie and keep Bauer winless since joining the Orioles when rosters expanded this month.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | September 27, 2001
BOSTON - Being around the plate is fine for a pitcher until he begins catching too much of it. That's when an inning speeds out of control, an appearance is cut short and a game ultimately is lost. Making only his fourth major-league start, the Orioles' Rick Bauer learned this hard truth last night while the Boston Red Sox were sending 10 batters to the plate and scoring six runs in the third, producing a rare victory, 9-6, at Fenway Park. They had dropped 18 of 22. The Red Sox strung together six consecutive hits to break a 1-1 tie and keep Bauer winless since joining the Orioles when rosters expanded this month.
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly | July 17, 1999
I had considered slipping out of town this weekend, but when a friend of mine with a house facing the ocean called to say my bed would be the floor, I thought better of the idea. As muggy as Baltimore may be, I'll stay right at home. I've had too many nights trying to bunk down in overcrowded vacation homes.I guess it goes without saying that a family vacation means just that -- no privacy, 12 to a room and dubious horizontal back support.In the early 1950s, we had a cute little house in Dewey Beach, Del., built atop the sand dunes.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 30, 1999
David Hess originally had a live-action Roadrunner film in mind. Thankfully, he ended-up instead with a wryly insightful documentary into what makes a man do what common sense tells him not to."The Green Monster," airing at 10 p.m. tomorrow on MPT, Channels 22 and 67, as part of PBS's "P.O.V." documentary series, relates the tale of Art Arfons, a 74-year-old Midwesterner who's spent his adult life setting land-speed records in cars he designed and built himself. The film uses as its centerpiece Arfons' 1991 attempt to once again become the fastest man on wheels.
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