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By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2011
A group of state workforce agencies launched a new job search site Tuesday for "green" occupations in the region, saying that Maryland, Washington and Virginia have more than 230,000 workers involved in some aspect of environmental protection or natural resource conservation. The job listings site, marcgreenworks.com, has openings ranging from geologist to software engineer. The Mid-Atlantic Regional Collaborative, which created the site, is made up of state workforce leaders in Maryland, Washington, D.C., and Virginia.
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NEWS
August 26, 2014
Understanding Marlene A. Condon's plea for us all to take responsibility to save our Chesapeake Bay ( "If you break it, you pay for it," Aug. 22) gives us overall plans to save the bay. Saving the bay under Ms. Condon's plans would simultaneously create green jobs, save species, clean the air and water, greatly beautify the landscape while reducing global warming through the trees, shrubs and flowers replacing much of the "largest crop grown" in the Chesapeake watershed - you guessed it, law and turf, which pollutes storm water runoff like pavement does and with it, pesticides, fertilizers and the exhausts of countless mowers and weed trimmers all adding to the slow death of our bay. Oh, and the bees, our pollinators, could thrive as well if we would follow the vision offered in this excellent commentary.
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NEWS
September 15, 2011
I read with interest your September 14th article "Green jobs economy has hits and misses in Maryland. " While the stagnant economy that we are presently mired in may well have slowed the growth of jobs related to sustainable energy and environmentally-driven services, we do know that there is a strong future for such jobs. Existing policies and consumer incentive programs will inevitably increase future demand for green products and services. For instance, most local governments now insist that new public buildings be built to LEED standards for energy efficiency.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2014
State and federal officials joined a Chesapeake Bay nonprofit Thursday in announcing the award of more than $3.7 million to 34 organizations to reduce storm-water pollution in Maryland and three neighboring states and the District of Columbia. Nine of the grants totaling more than $1 million went toward planting trees, removing pavement and other greening projects in Baltimore city, while two smaller grants targeted plantings in Baltimore County. Shawn Garvin, Mid-Atlantic regional administrator for the Environmental Protection Agency, whose agency provided some of the funds, said investing in such "green infrastructure" to soak up rainfall is "critically important to restoring local waters and the Chesapeake Bay. " Storm-water runoff is a significant and growing source of pollution fouling the bay, but controlling it in dense, older communities is challenging and costly.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2010
Maryland should increase its efforts to protect natural resources, reduce waste and promote renewable energy as a way to attract and retain jobs in fast-growing green sectors, according to a report by a governor-appointed task force to be unveiled Wednesday. Recommendations of the Green Jobs & Industry Task Force, part of Gov. Martin O'Malley's initiative to create or retain 100,000 green jobs by 2015, include increasing the state's reliance on wind power and solar energy, improving public transportation and promoting high-density development around transit hubs.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | July 15, 2012
There are a couple of serious problems with the so-called "green jobs revolution. " The first concerns the serial overpromising of new jobs from politicians of all stripes. And it's easy to understand why the overpromising is so rampant: All of us want to believe alternative sources of energy will free us of our overdependence on foreign (and often hostile) sources of energy. Throw in the possibility of thousands of new technology jobs and you have plenty of eager politicians ready to sell a green jobs platform.
BUSINESS
November 19, 2009
The federal government is underwriting a $4 million study of how many "green" jobs there are in Maryland, Virginia and Washington and how to increase them, labor officials announced Wednesday. The Mid-Atlantic regional study is the largest among nearly $55 million in grants awarded nationwide by the U.S. Department of Labor. The funds will pay for job training and information to help workers find jobs in so-called "green" industries or related occupations. The O'Malley administration has set a goal of creating 30,000 new green jobs in Maryland by 2012, but estimates of how many such jobs there are now vary widely, from nearly 11,000 to 35,000, said Andy Moser, assistant secretary in the state's Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2011
Dirty, used oil promises to bring some badly needed jobs to Baltimore, one recycling company says. But energy-saving light fixtures aren't proving to be the growth business that another company thought they were — at least not yet. FCC Environmental, a Houston-based company, recently announced plans to build a $50 million plant in Fairfield to recycle used motor oil, hiring 30 people to reclaim a waste normally burned in industrial boilers....
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2010
Carmera Thomas says she loves nature and majored in biology in college. But the job market's so tough, she's been working part time in a restaurant since graduating in May. Now the 22-year-old Glen Burnie woman is finally getting a chance to put her education and passion to work, under a new state program meant to train young people for jobs in environmental restoration and energy conservation while they perform community service. Thomas and 15 other applicants debuted Monday as the inaugural class of the Chesapeake Conservation Corps, which pairs young adults with watershed organizations, local or state agencies, and community groups for a year of work and learning.
NEWS
By Andrew P. Morriss | April 22, 2009
Green jobs" are touted as the universal cure-all, saving the environment and the economy at the same time. Congress included more than $80 billion in spending and tax incentives to promote them in the recent stimulus bill. It is a wonderful vision that fits nicely with Wednesday's 39th anniversary of the first Earth Day. Unfortunately, claims about the wonders of green jobs are all too often constructed on myths about economics, forecasting and technology. In a recent study I co-wrote, we waded through the most comprehensive green jobs proposals and found that most plans are a gamble on unproven technologies.
NEWS
Lionel Foster | February 21, 2013
I never thought I'd hear a Baltimorean say such a thing. Last week, while reporting on the Rawlings-Blake administration's 10-year financial plan, I spoke with the mayor's press secretary, Ian Brennan. We covered a lot of ground in our hourlong phone conversation, but one comment in particular rewound itself repeatedly in my mind like a game-deciding, goal-line drive. One day, said Mr. Brennan, "We would love to be spoken of like … Pittsburgh as a city not suffering post-industrial urban decay any longer.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | July 15, 2012
There are a couple of serious problems with the so-called "green jobs revolution. " The first concerns the serial overpromising of new jobs from politicians of all stripes. And it's easy to understand why the overpromising is so rampant: All of us want to believe alternative sources of energy will free us of our overdependence on foreign (and often hostile) sources of energy. Throw in the possibility of thousands of new technology jobs and you have plenty of eager politicians ready to sell a green jobs platform.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2012
Farming in the city doesn't need a lot of land - and sometimes not even arable land. On a South Baltimore parking lot, inside six plastic-covered greenhouses, a handful of urban farmers are raising a cornucopia of greens in a thin layer of imported soil. Once the site of the city's maintenance garage, the half-acre "farm" on the paved-over brownfield by the Middle Branch now produces arugula, romaine, spring onions, basil, cilantro, fennel - even spicy edible flowers. And it's all organic, the growers say. Big City Farms is the name of this budding agricultural enterprise, operating on land now owned by the National Aquarium.
NEWS
April 15, 2012
On April 17, I will be protesting war taxes at Baltimore's main post office. I realize that taxes fund many good programs - education, environment and diplomacy. But sadly when 57 percent of the federal budget goes to the Pentagon, the government's priorities are out of touch with the pressing problems facing its citizens. Instead of investing in a clean energy future and prioritizing human and environmental needs, we are somehow still caught in the outdated and dangerous thinking of the past.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2012
Updated: With quotes from Garagioa and O'Malley.  The state's top Democrat will weigh into one of the most competitive primary election in Maryland on Thursday. Gov.Martin O'Malleywill back state Sen. Rob Garagiola in his bid to capture the nomination in the 6th Congressional District, a significant get for a candidate who has faced a stronger than expected challenge from Potomac banker John Delaney late in the campaign. The endorsement comes nearly four months after Garagiola received the backing of Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown and it arrives at a potentially critical time for his campaign.
NEWS
October 3, 2011
The private firms developing two major state-sponsored projects say they are trying to take advantage of a little-known element of immigration law that provides green cards to foreigners who invest $500,000 to $1 million in a job-creating enterprise in the United States. It's apparently the first time something like this has been tried in Maryland, and it's making some people uncomfortable, including Senate Minority Leader Nancy Jacobs of Harford County. She's contemplating legislation to make the use of investor visas illegal for state projects, saying it sounds like we're selling citizenship and "turning the country over to the Chinese.
NEWS
By Yoni Levinson | April 2, 2009
The green jobs debate rages on. Some argue that all the stimulus money being poured into green efforts - such as renewable energy and building retrofitting - will create millions of jobs and will revitalize the economy. Others are not so sure. The Institute for Energy Research just published a study challenging the rosy predictions of people like those at the Center for American Progress who predicted that $100 billion worth of green investment would create 2 million jobs. One criticism is that the term "green job" is ill-defined.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2012
Updated: With quotes from Garagioa and O'Malley.  The state's top Democrat will weigh into one of the most competitive primary election in Maryland on Thursday. Gov.Martin O'Malleywill back state Sen. Rob Garagiola in his bid to capture the nomination in the 6th Congressional District, a significant get for a candidate who has faced a stronger than expected challenge from Potomac banker John Delaney late in the campaign. The endorsement comes nearly four months after Garagiola received the backing of Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown and it arrives at a potentially critical time for his campaign.
NEWS
September 15, 2011
I read with interest your September 14th article "Green jobs economy has hits and misses in Maryland. " While the stagnant economy that we are presently mired in may well have slowed the growth of jobs related to sustainable energy and environmentally-driven services, we do know that there is a strong future for such jobs. Existing policies and consumer incentive programs will inevitably increase future demand for green products and services. For instance, most local governments now insist that new public buildings be built to LEED standards for energy efficiency.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2011
Dirty, used oil promises to bring some badly needed jobs to Baltimore, one recycling company says. But energy-saving light fixtures aren't proving to be the growth business that another company thought they were — at least not yet. FCC Environmental, a Houston-based company, recently announced plans to build a $50 million plant in Fairfield to recycle used motor oil, hiring 30 people to reclaim a waste normally burned in industrial boilers....
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