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By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2012
If a tree falls in a Maryland forest, does anyone know its value? State Forester Steve Koehn threw back his head and laughed when asked that question. And then he jumped at the chance to shed some light on what he calls one of Maryland's best-kept secrets. "Forest products are a $4 billion-a-year industry in Maryland," he said. "For comparison, seafood is a $950 million industry. " Koehn stood on a gentle slope in the middle of a towering stand of poplar trees, their golden leaves electrified by a bright fall sun. Eighteen months ago, loggers harvested that private plot in western Baltimore County, removing about half of the trees.
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NEWS
April 18, 2014
The latest findings from the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change are not as bad as some may have expected. Not that climate change isn't worsening - it is. The window to do something about it is still closing, and the potential impact on human life from harsher weather, coastal flooding and other effects is just as bad as feared. None of that has changed. But one of the important conclusions of the United Nations panel, which has spent years summarizing the latest research, is that addressing climate change appears to be cheaper than doing nothing.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2010
Maryland should increase its efforts to protect natural resources, reduce waste and promote renewable energy as a way to attract and retain jobs in fast-growing green sectors, according to a report by a governor-appointed task force to be unveiled Wednesday. Recommendations of the Green Jobs & Industry Task Force, part of Gov. Martin O'Malley's initiative to create or retain 100,000 green jobs by 2015, include increasing the state's reliance on wind power and solar energy, improving public transportation and promoting high-density development around transit hubs.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and By Liz Bowie | December 3, 2013
  Governor Martin O'Malley appointed Larry Giammo, a former Rockville mayor and director of a national non-profit, to the state school board Tuesday. Giammo fills a seat vacated by Ivan Walls, a Montgomery County doctor, who resigned a few months ago.  The appointment means the 12-member state board will continue to be dominated by five members from the Prince George's and Montgomery county area of the state. Two school board members are from Baltimore City, one is from Howard, and three are from the rural counties of Kent, Allegany and Calvert.  The board, which decides education policy for the state, also has one student member each year.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and By Liz Bowie | December 3, 2013
  Governor Martin O'Malley appointed Larry Giammo, a former Rockville mayor and director of a national non-profit, to the state school board Tuesday. Giammo fills a seat vacated by Ivan Walls, a Montgomery County doctor, who resigned a few months ago.  The appointment means the 12-member state board will continue to be dominated by five members from the Prince George's and Montgomery county area of the state. Two school board members are from Baltimore City, one is from Howard, and three are from the rural counties of Kent, Allegany and Calvert.  The board, which decides education policy for the state, also has one student member each year.
NEWS
July 6, 2012
The big story in The Sun this past week was the unforeseen storm. In the editorial, "Feeling powerless" (July 3), the question asked was this a "freak occurrence?" Your answer makes sense: "Climate science suggests that global warming will make unusual and severe weather much more common. " However, I have a suggestion. Instead of global warming, use climate chaos. What I witnessed in Baltimore on the Friday night of the storm was climate chaos. Only a head-in-the-sand politician would deny that human activity is causing climate chaos.
NEWS
By Kevin Zeese and Linda Schade | June 2, 2008
Baltimore's thousands of abandoned homes are a blight - but also an opportunity to create neighborhoods full of green buildings that are efficient and produce solar or geothermal energy. The city's abandoned industries are a sign of decay - or a source of rooftops that could be turned into massive solar energy producers and retrofitted into green manufacturing. Is it time for Baltimore to "go green" in a big way? The Baltimore Sustainability Commission thinks so, and it's not alone. The commission's first public meeting was held last week with a standing room only crowd.
NEWS
May 3, 2008
Where's the outrage over use of torture? As a resident of Baltimore, a member of the Sisters of Mercy, and a longtime reader of the The Sun, I am writing to express my outrage regarding the recent reports that President Bush's top national security advisers (including Vice President Dick Cheney and Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice) held numerous meetings in the White House to approve the use of abusive interrogation techniques (including waterboarding and sleep deprivation) on high-value detainees ("Justice Dept.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2011
The Baltimore region's "clean" economy — green energy, pollution-reduction services and the like — accounts for nearly 23,000 jobs but is not growing as robustly as clean industries nationwide, according to a report due out Wednesday. The region added clean-economy jobs at a rate of 2.6 percent a year between 2003 and 2010, ranking it 76th among the nation's 100 largest metro areas, according to the study by the Brookings Institution. Mark Muro, who co-authored the report for the Washington think tank, said the Baltimore-area clean economy has a lot of slower-growing, mature industries such as waste management and fewer rapid-growth upstarts in clean technology.
NEWS
November 5, 2008
Do more to promote Md.'s green economy The editorial "Making Maryland green" (Nov. 2) is correct in calling for aggressively promoting alternative energy. But I would suggest that the state needs to do much more. The editorial mentions, in passing, that the recent $700 billion federal financial rescue package included an additional $150 billion in tax breaks and incentives. Included among the tax provisions are an estimated $18 billion in tax credits for innovating clean power and energy-efficiency systems and conservation, including everything from extending the all-important energy-efficient commercial building deduction to creating a tax credit for electricity created by waves, tides or ocean currents.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2012
If a tree falls in a Maryland forest, does anyone know its value? State Forester Steve Koehn threw back his head and laughed when asked that question. And then he jumped at the chance to shed some light on what he calls one of Maryland's best-kept secrets. "Forest products are a $4 billion-a-year industry in Maryland," he said. "For comparison, seafood is a $950 million industry. " Koehn stood on a gentle slope in the middle of a towering stand of poplar trees, their golden leaves electrified by a bright fall sun. Eighteen months ago, loggers harvested that private plot in western Baltimore County, removing about half of the trees.
NEWS
July 6, 2012
The big story in The Sun this past week was the unforeseen storm. In the editorial, "Feeling powerless" (July 3), the question asked was this a "freak occurrence?" Your answer makes sense: "Climate science suggests that global warming will make unusual and severe weather much more common. " However, I have a suggestion. Instead of global warming, use climate chaos. What I witnessed in Baltimore on the Friday night of the storm was climate chaos. Only a head-in-the-sand politician would deny that human activity is causing climate chaos.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2011
Dirty, used oil promises to bring some badly needed jobs to Baltimore, one recycling company says. But energy-saving light fixtures aren't proving to be the growth business that another company thought they were — at least not yet. FCC Environmental, a Houston-based company, recently announced plans to build a $50 million plant in Fairfield to recycle used motor oil, hiring 30 people to reclaim a waste normally burned in industrial boilers....
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2011
The Baltimore region's "clean" economy — green energy, pollution-reduction services and the like — accounts for nearly 23,000 jobs but is not growing as robustly as clean industries nationwide, according to a report due out Wednesday. The region added clean-economy jobs at a rate of 2.6 percent a year between 2003 and 2010, ranking it 76th among the nation's 100 largest metro areas, according to the study by the Brookings Institution. Mark Muro, who co-authored the report for the Washington think tank, said the Baltimore-area clean economy has a lot of slower-growing, mature industries such as waste management and fewer rapid-growth upstarts in clean technology.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2010
Maryland should increase its efforts to protect natural resources, reduce waste and promote renewable energy as a way to attract and retain jobs in fast-growing green sectors, according to a report by a governor-appointed task force to be unveiled Wednesday. Recommendations of the Green Jobs & Industry Task Force, part of Gov. Martin O'Malley's initiative to create or retain 100,000 green jobs by 2015, include increasing the state's reliance on wind power and solar energy, improving public transportation and promoting high-density development around transit hubs.
NEWS
November 5, 2008
Do more to promote Md.'s green economy The editorial "Making Maryland green" (Nov. 2) is correct in calling for aggressively promoting alternative energy. But I would suggest that the state needs to do much more. The editorial mentions, in passing, that the recent $700 billion federal financial rescue package included an additional $150 billion in tax breaks and incentives. Included among the tax provisions are an estimated $18 billion in tax credits for innovating clean power and energy-efficiency systems and conservation, including everything from extending the all-important energy-efficient commercial building deduction to creating a tax credit for electricity created by waves, tides or ocean currents.
NEWS
April 18, 2014
The latest findings from the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change are not as bad as some may have expected. Not that climate change isn't worsening - it is. The window to do something about it is still closing, and the potential impact on human life from harsher weather, coastal flooding and other effects is just as bad as feared. None of that has changed. But one of the important conclusions of the United Nations panel, which has spent years summarizing the latest research, is that addressing climate change appears to be cheaper than doing nothing.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2011
Dirty, used oil promises to bring some badly needed jobs to Baltimore, one recycling company says. But energy-saving light fixtures aren't proving to be the growth business that another company thought they were — at least not yet. FCC Environmental, a Houston-based company, recently announced plans to build a $50 million plant in Fairfield to recycle used motor oil, hiring 30 people to reclaim a waste normally burned in industrial boilers....
NEWS
By Kevin Zeese and Linda Schade | June 2, 2008
Baltimore's thousands of abandoned homes are a blight - but also an opportunity to create neighborhoods full of green buildings that are efficient and produce solar or geothermal energy. The city's abandoned industries are a sign of decay - or a source of rooftops that could be turned into massive solar energy producers and retrofitted into green manufacturing. Is it time for Baltimore to "go green" in a big way? The Baltimore Sustainability Commission thinks so, and it's not alone. The commission's first public meeting was held last week with a standing room only crowd.
NEWS
May 3, 2008
Where's the outrage over use of torture? As a resident of Baltimore, a member of the Sisters of Mercy, and a longtime reader of the The Sun, I am writing to express my outrage regarding the recent reports that President Bush's top national security advisers (including Vice President Dick Cheney and Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice) held numerous meetings in the White House to approve the use of abusive interrogation techniques (including waterboarding and sleep deprivation) on high-value detainees ("Justice Dept.
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