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NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | March 10, 2003
An old farmhouse turned lumberyard on Route 175 in Jessup soon will become a local showcase for environmental friendliness and an incubator for green company start-ups, if Stanley Sersen has his way. The president of Architectural Support Group Inc., a Glen Burnie company that helps builders incorporate solar panels and windmills to condominiums and apartments, plans to transform the aged brown and yellow eyesore into an office, resource center, incubator...
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | February 18, 2014
Maryland jumped to second place last year in a ranking of environmentally friendly building activity. In 2013, the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) said it approved 119 commercial or institutional projects in Maryland for certification under Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design or LEED standards, a total of 12.7 million square feet. That represents 2.2 square feet of LEED-certified real estate per resident, behind Illinois at 2.29 square feet per resident. The LEED system considers aspects of a project's design, contruction and operation, including water use, installation of green appliances, ingredients of building materials, and access to public transit.
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BUSINESS
By McClatchy-Tribune | January 6, 2008
HGTV is building its first "Green Home" near Hilton Head Island, S.C., for a nationwide giveaway. The Jasper House -- a three-bedroom, two-bathroom home being built to stringent environmental standards -- is in Tradition Hilton Head, a 5,300-acre, 9,500-home development in Hardeeville, S.C. Builders of the house are following LEED standards, which stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design. Developed by the nonprofit U.S. Green Building Council, the LEED Green Building Rating System is one of the leading national benchmarks for green building.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2011
The Howard County Council is considering this month a bill to authorize property tax credits for homeowners whose property meets environmental design standards, a measure that would make the county one of the few local governments to give such breaks. Under the bill, owners of newly built homes that meet the "silver" standard in Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED certification, awarded by the U.S. Green Building Council, could receive up to a 25 percent discount on their county property tax bill, while homes with the highest LEED rating could earn a 75 percent discount the first year.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | October 21, 2007
A green building tax credit for businesses that construct or renovate their commercial or industrial properties with environmentally friendly features could be included in the legislative package the Carroll County commissioners ask state legislators to pass during the next General Assembly session. Carroll County's proposal comes as several area jurisdictions, including Howard, Montgomery and Baltimore City and County, are enacting green building standards. While Howard County will require that any proposed commercial building of 50,000 square feet or more obtain certification through the U.S. Green Building Council, Carroll officials said they would keep these environmental goals optional.
BUSINESS
By From Sun staff reports | March 15, 2009
The National Association of Home Builders recently named Silo Point, the grain elevator in Locust Point being renovated into condos, a community of the year among its Nationals awards, recognizing work in residential real estate sales, marketing and design. Silo Point's awards include gold-level honors for best urban sales center, best brochure for a community over $1 million and attached community of the year; and silver for graphic continuity, advertising campaign and Web site for an urban community.
BUSINESS
By Margo Stack and Margo Stack,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 13, 2005
When Judith Lennox began renovating her "green" home in Roland Park, she had a double-barreled goal: She wanted to lessen her footprint on the environment, but also demonstrate that living in an Earth-friendly home was not a pie-in-the-sky dream. "I wanted to do something that would make the people around me realize that `going green' is doable," she said. "It's not just a hippie thing." Lennox spent a year searching for the right house before settling on a 90-year-old bungalow-style home for $356,000 in September 2003.
NEWS
By Kelly Caffarelli | September 9, 2010
When people hear the term "green building," most think of homes covered with solar panels, bamboo floors and metal exteriors that make them look like spaceships. In other words, homes that most people wouldn't want to live in. At The Home Depot Foundation, our definition of a "green building" is different. For us, a "green building" is simply one built with environmentally friendly materials such as nontoxic insulation, caulk and paint and that uses water-saving faucets and energy-efficient appliances.
BUSINESS
By Adele Evans and Adele Evans,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 9, 2003
When Chuck Fox and his family decided it was time to remodel their Crownsville home, they had a lot of questions about what to use and how much it would all cost, but one thing was for sure - the only color on the palette would be green. An environmentally friendly design - often referred to as "green building" - was a given for Fox, former director of the state Department of Natural Resources and currently senior policy adviser at the Chesapeake Bay Foundation. That meant optimal use of the sun, recycled supplies and new materials that had the least negative impact on the environment.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg and Janene Holzberg,Special to the Sun | May 9, 2008
The University of Maryland has invited 900 of its closest neighbors for light refreshments tomorrow to talk about the environmentally friendly building it plans to erect at its research farm in western Ellicott City. Postcard invitations to the informational session were recently mailed to residents of communities surrounding the school's 922-acre property, where the Central Maryland Research and Education Center has been since 1988. Eight-foot-wide banners proclaiming, "We're going Green in your neighborhood!"
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2011
Chronically homeless women will soon have fully furnished apartments of their own in a newly renovated building in southwestern Baltimore County. The YWCA Greater Baltimore, which is overseeing the Arbutus Permanent Supportive Housing program, opened the apartment complex Thursday and anticipates full occupancy by next month. The women will have the privacy not afforded in shelters, the comforts of their own things about them and on-site counseling, all of which organizers say will help them move on with their lives.
NEWS
June 14, 2011
On May 23, the City Council of Aberdeen passed a budget that increased spending over last year and while cutting property taxes, raised our water and sewer rates. At this meeting, Mayor Michael Bennett said that he chooses not to use the constant yield, the rate that would cut the property tax further to keep spending at last year's level, because if the city isn't spending more money, then "nothing exciting is happening" in Aberdeen. On June 13, the council will vote on a tax break for buildings that pass green building or "LEED" certification.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2011
Ten redevelopment projects around Maryland will receive more than $11.1 million in state grants to move to the construction stage under a program intended to encourage historic preservation and "green" building practices. Gov. Martin O'Malley announced Friday that the funds are coming from the Sustainable Communities Tax Credit program, successor to the state's old Historic Preservation Tax Credit program. Despite its name, the program was structured for 2011 to give outright grants, not tax credits.
NEWS
By Kelly Caffarelli | September 9, 2010
When people hear the term "green building," most think of homes covered with solar panels, bamboo floors and metal exteriors that make them look like spaceships. In other words, homes that most people wouldn't want to live in. At The Home Depot Foundation, our definition of a "green building" is different. For us, a "green building" is simply one built with environmentally friendly materials such as nontoxic insulation, caulk and paint and that uses water-saving faucets and energy-efficient appliances.
NEWS
By Tim Wheeler and Tim Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | February 3, 2010
Baltimore's green building law, considered one of the most sweeping in the nation, lingers in a legal limbo of sorts more than seven months after it supposedly took effect. The city has yet to publish regulations to carry out the law, which requires most private as well as public buildings to be energy-efficient and environmentally friendly in their design and construction. Though promised by the end of 2009, the rules and a set of home-grown green building standards are still being tinkered with by city officials.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts , ed.gunts@baltsun.com | December 9, 2009
When the owners of Baltimore's Black Olive restaurant began formulating plans to build an inn one block away, the word "green" still referred to a color more than an environmental movement. But in the 10 years that the project has been under development, builders have learned plenty about "eco-friendly" design, including which green features are mostly marketing gimmicks and which really can have a lasting impact. When it opens next year, the $6 million Inn at the Black Olive won't be the first local hotel and marketplace with a green roof or bamboo woodwork.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,jamie.smith.hopkins@baltsun.com | October 22, 2009
A Columbia-based national affordable-housing financier intends to funnel $4 billion in the next five years toward building and retrofitting homes that aren't just affordable, but also green. Enterprise Community Partners, a nonprofit that raises money from corporations, foundations and government agencies, said Wednesday that it believes that investment can build or renovate 75,000 homes and apartments. At the same time, it challenged builders across the country to go green on all projects aimed at lower- and moderate-income residents.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | May 29, 2009
Maryland emitted more cumulative global warming pollution between 1960 and 2005 than more than 150 other nations surveyed, according to a report released this week by Greenpeace. And that makes it one of the least-polluting states on a per-person basis. The United States has long been considered the chief emitter, but months ahead of a global forum on the subject, the environmental organization was seeking to underscore the level by compiling Department of Energy statistics for individual states and comparing them with World Resource Institute data from 184 other countries.
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