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By Bill DeYoung and Bill DeYoung,New York Times News Service | July 31, 1995
In Vietnam, John Scott Gantt was known as a Green Beret who could get things done.A captain with the 5th Special Forces, Mr. Gantt was 30 years old in 1968 when he devised a scheme to fly a pair of elephants cross-country to a remote mountain village. By helicopter.Mr. Gantt's animal adventure forms the basis of Disney's "Operation Dumbo Drop," which opened in theaters on Friday. Although the movie is based on a real event, the filmmakers took lots of liberties with the facts. "If you had to pick somebody that was me, it would be Danny Glover," says Mr. Gantt, who lives in Cross City, Fla.Mr.
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By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun reporter | October 31, 2007
Even as a teenager, breaking swimming records at the North Baltimore Aquatic Club, Joey Curreri was leaving a mark as deep as his churning wake in the water. "He was, hands down, the most motivated individual I've ever encountered," said Brad Schertle, a fellow swimmer and longtime friend. "Joey was Michael Phelps before Michael Phelps was." The Pentagon announced yesterday that Staff Sgt. Joseph F. Curreri, a 27-year-old Green Beret in the Army's Special Forces, drowned last week while serving in the Philippines.
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By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun reporter | October 31, 2007
Even as a teenager, breaking swimming records at the North Baltimore Aquatic Club, Joey Curreri was leaving a mark as deep as his churning wake in the water. "He was, hands down, the most motivated individual I've ever encountered," said Brad Schertle, a fellow swimmer and longtime friend. "Joey was Michael Phelps before Michael Phelps was." The Pentagon announced yesterday that Staff Sgt. Joseph F. Curreri, a 27-year-old Green Beret in the Army's Special Forces, drowned last week while serving in the Philippines.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | July 5, 2007
Tiger Woods hasn't taken over the entire world, as his dad once implied he would. But this weekend, starting today, he takes over the capital of the free world. He's hosting a golf tournament at Congressional that's a combined tribute to the Washington community, the troops and his newborn daughter, Sam. And to his father, Earl. The tourney's official name is the AT&T National, but the better name would be the Tiger's Dad Memorial. Woods spoke at length to reporters Tuesday, and in every answer, it seemed, was the thread of his father's influence: on his upbringing, his discipline, the commitment to charity, his respect for servicemen - Earl was a Green Beret - and his new family responsibilities.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 17, 1997
WASHINGTON -- A towering Army Green Beret general who led the air assault in the Persian Gulf war and directed the peaceful invasion of Haiti has been selected by President Clinton to be the next chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, sources said yesterday.The general, Henry Hugh Shelton, a 55-year-old North Carolina native who heads the U.S. Special Operations Command in Tampa, Fla., emerged from a field of better-known generals after a rugged selection process.Clinton plans to announce the nomination as early as today.
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By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 14, 1998
WASHINGTON -- On a September afternoon in 1970, Air Force Lt. Tom Stump flew low over Laos in his A-1 attack plane, supporting a U.S. ground operation against a North Vietnamese stronghold.Stump unloaded bomblets on the enemy troops while other U.S. planes dropped canisters of gas. Crackling over his radio came the sounds of American troops choking and coughing."Those guys got a pretty good dose of the stuff," he recalled. "[The planes] went right in over our guys."That incident is the focus of a report that the gas was sarin -- the substance that killed 12 people on a Tokyo subway in 1995 -- and that it was used against a group of U.S. defectors and that it wounded American troops positioned near the enemy.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2000
Ellis M. Howard, a Green Beret in Vietnam who became a union leader and explosives technician at Aberdeen Proving Ground, died Thursday of leukemia at his home. He was 58 and lived in Pikesville. Born in Evergreen, Ala., he moved with his family to Baltimore in his youth and graduated from Douglass High School in 1960. He joined the Army in 1962 and served as a Green Beret in the Special Forces in the Vietnam War. He was honorably discharged in 1965. "He was very proud, especially of being able to jump from planes.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Staff Writer | April 7, 1993
Two brothers, one a former deputy sheriff, the other a former Green Beret, stood side by side in Anne Arundel Circuit Court yesterday and pleaded guilty to sexually abusing their daughters over 10 years, ending a decade ago.Norman S. Marriott Jr., 52, of Mount Pleasant Mills, Pa., the former Green Beret, and Edward Marriott, 50, a former deputy from Big Fork, Mont., entered Alford pleas to two counts each of unnatural and perverted sex practices yesterday before Judge Raymond G. Thieme Jr. They did not admit guilt, but conceded that prosecutors had enough evidence to convict them.
NEWS
July 25, 2004
Lt. Col. Clifton Reed Johnson, a decorated career Army officer, Green Beret and chemical weapons expert, died of heart failure July 18 at Perry Point Veterans Hospital. He was 68 and lived in Bel Air. Born in Baltimore, Colonel Johnson was a 1953 graduate of Carver High School in Towson. He earned a bachelor's degree in biology in 1957 from what was then Morgan State College and his master's degree in bacteriology from the University of Wisconsin at Madison in 1959. He enlisted in the Army in 1957 and, after serving in Korea, was assigned to Fort Detrick near Frederick.
NEWS
By Jay Merwin and Jay Merwin,Evening Sun Staff | February 21, 1991
Men in shorts and T-shirts pumped out push-ups. Men in camouflage packed their equipment into boxes. Another knot of men listened to a squat sergeant chew them out for dawdling. "Get it done," he repeated between expletives.All of them belonged to two Maryland National Guard green beret companies reporting yesterday for active duty to the Gunpowder Military Reservation in Glen Arm. They are the first combat units from Maryland and the first Army Guard special forces units in the country to be activated for the gulf crisis.
NEWS
July 25, 2004
Lt. Col. Clifton Reed Johnson, a decorated career Army officer, Green Beret and chemical weapons expert, died of heart failure July 18 at Perry Point Veterans Hospital. He was 68 and lived in Bel Air. Born in Baltimore, Colonel Johnson was a 1953 graduate of Carver High School in Towson. He earned a bachelor's degree in biology in 1957 from what was then Morgan State College and his master's degree in bacteriology from the University of Wisconsin at Madison in 1959. He enlisted in the Army in 1957 and, after serving in Korea, was assigned to Fort Detrick near Frederick.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 6, 2003
FORT CARSON, Colo. - Not since the Vietnam War has the Army punished a soldier for being too scared to do his duty. But tomorrow, Staff Sgt. Georg-Andreas Pogany will appear before a military court here to face charges of cowardice. The Army says he is guilty of "cowardly conduct as a result of fear" and not performing his duties as an interrogator for a squad of Green Berets in Samarra, Iraq. But Pogany says he did not run from the enemy or disobey orders. The only thing he is guilty of, he says, is asking for help for a panic attack.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 3, 2002
WASHINGTON - They were crucial to the defeat of the Taliban government, calling in precision airstrikes while huddled in the hills with Afghan allies. And these shadowy warriors are playing an increasingly larger role in the overall war on terror, training foreign troops from the gorges of Georgia to the steamy jungles of the Philippines. Now, military leaders are looking at these special operations forces - from the Army's Green Berets to the Navy's SEALs - with heightened interest, proposing to increase their numbers, provide new equipment and set up more training missions with rank-and-file troops.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 27, 2002
WASHINGTON - President Bush moved yesterday to fill two top federal health jobs, nominating a trauma surgeon who is also a sheriff's deputy as surgeon general and Dr. Elias Zerhouni, an administrator at the Johns Hopkins University, to direct the National Institutes of Health. At a White House ceremony with the nominees and their families, Bush praised the two doctors, both of whom spoke of their humble beginnings, as "distinguished physicians who have worked tirelessly to save lives and to improve lives."
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 26, 2002
WASHINGTON - U.S. troops will soon begin training recruits for a new Afghan army, with the goal of boosting security and safeguarding Afghanistan's borders, Pentagon officials said yesterday. The mission will be led by Army Green Beret troops who will start the training in late spring, officials said. They said the U.S. troops would use a series of 10-week training cycles to create a projected total of 2,400 Afghan soldiers. "Training the Afghan army will serve as a positive step to help ensure that there is a better chance for peace and security in Afghanistan and that the country is not used as a terrorist haven in the future," Gen. Richard B. Myers, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said yesterday.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 22, 2002
WASHINGTON - They rode alongside Afghan soldiers in cavalry charges and called in airstrikes from B-52 bombers. Now the Army's elite Green Berets are getting ready to provide another service to Afghanistan: training a national army. The Green Berets "will lead the effort" and begin working with Afghan recruits "within the next month or so," says one military officer, adding that troops from the international coalition also will assist in training and equipping the new army, which Afghan leaders hope will someday grow to 50,000 soldiers.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 4, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Greg Walker spent nearly 18 months in El Salvador in the 1980s training that country's army in its struggle with Marxist-led rebels. Shot at by snipers, the Green Beret sergeant also pursued guerrillas into the rugged volcanic mountains after they attacked his base camp.Walker returned home unscathed. Army Sgt. Greg Fronius and Lt. Col. David Pickett weren't so lucky. Fronius, another Green Beret, was killed in 1987 while rallying Salvadorans in a counterattack against the guerrillas.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 17, 2001
WASHINGTON - From a ridge above the dusty Afghan village of Tirin Kowt, Army Capt. Jason Amerine became part of a new American style of warfare. The 30-year-old Green Beret officer, leading a dozen-member "A Team" and advising Pashtun rebels, called in U.S. airstrikes against a larger Taliban force. Hundreds of fighters and scores of vehicles were surging toward the town outside Kandahar. Using sophisticated radios and range finders, Amerine helped the U.S. pilots unleash their precision-guided bombs.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 5, 2002
WASHINGTON - An Army special forces soldier was killed yesterday during a firefight in eastern Afghanistan near the Pakistan border, the first member of the U.S. military to die from hostile fire in the 3-month-old conflict, defense officials said. A CIA officer, who was among those accompanying the special forces soldiers, was wounded by the small-arms fire but is expected to survive, officials said. No other U.S. personnel were hurt, officials said. The casualties were a reminder that U.S. forces in Afghanistan still face grave dangers despite the defeat of the Taliban regime and intensive attacks on the al-Qaida terrorist network.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 17, 2001
WASHINGTON - From a ridge above the dusty Afghan village of Tirin Kowt, Army Capt. Jason Amerine became part of a new American style of warfare. The 30-year-old Green Beret officer, leading a dozen-member "A Team" and advising Pashtun rebels, called in U.S. airstrikes against a larger Taliban force. Hundreds of fighters and scores of vehicles were surging toward the town outside Kandahar. Using sophisticated radios and range finders, Amerine helped the U.S. pilots unleash their precision-guided bombs.
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